Museum art – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 04:01:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://laprairie-shlm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-2-150x150.png Museum art – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ 32 32 Release date of the museum’s art book: April https://laprairie-shlm.com/release-date-of-the-museums-art-book-april/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/release-date-of-the-museums-art-book-april/ SOLVANG, Calif., Jan. 10, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Here’s another “Time Gates” from Santo Cervello. A museum art book that contains three hundred images of times past, present and future. Volumes III and IV are now combined in a single eBook, available on Kindle. “Time Gates” Volumes I, II and V, by Santo Cervello, are […]]]>

SOLVANG, Calif., Jan. 10, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Here’s another “Time Gates” from Santo Cervello. A museum art book that contains three hundred images of times past, present and future. Volumes III and IV are now combined in a single eBook, available on Kindle.

“Time Gates” Volumes I, II and V, by Santo Cervello, are now on sale on Amazon.

Foreword by Grace Lebecka

“Doors of time, the intuitive art of Santo Cervello” Volume lll.

A few years ago we received a wonderful visit from two of our dearest friends. John and his wife decided to drive from Malibu, CA to the Santa Ynez Valley and joined us for dinner.

John is a nice, sweet guy who works as a music producer. He creates wonderful and clear sound for his musician clients and their music is heard all over the world. Santo spent time with John, asking him a question: “Is it possible to find the crystal-clear sound that creates peace for humanity on Earth?” ”

The images in this art book emerged during an extraordinary time of the global pandemic when Mankind became One. Volume III is full of wandering detours, trials, traps, real dangers and exciting encounters. There are healers and guides who bring hope to mankind with a slice of Johnny’s apple pie. Can we give hope to the hidden child, in the Doors of Time of our heart and can we find peace on Earth together?

It has been written that the artist is the first to arrive at the start of the New Renaissance. The Sound Seeker’s Journey is to find the key that unlocks the sealed doors of the museum that lead us into the Halls of Truth. This art book is the artist’s call for peace.

About the author and the artist

In 2011, before opening the Actor’s Corner Café, Santo and his wife Grace created the art museum. Santo Cervello’s five volumes of “Time Gates” contain nearly seven hundred fine art images. This fascinating work of art is interwoven with fiction, drama, poetry and philosophical discourse. It is as if you are entering a unique theater, where everything is full of rich images, dynamism and dynamism.

Santo Cervello has worked as an actor-director and writer-producer in Canadian theater presenting innovative and transformative dramas that have touched millions of people in Canada, the United States and Great Britain. He has written plays for CBC and BBC radio and a television series for Singapore television and has performed at Carnegie Recital Hall in New York.

In 1972, Mr. Cervello established the Erewhon Theater which aroused passions and created dynamic trends in Canadian theater until 2011. Together with his wife Grace, they now live in California and are currently working on the next volumes III and IV. of “Time Gates”.

The five volumes of “Time Gates” reflect the diverse professional background of its author: from actor / director / producer / chef to an intuitive painter / writer / philosopher and entrepreneur. For more information, please see: https://www.actorscornercafe.com/

Distribution of art books by Ingram Sparks. Through our global distribution network “Time Gates, The Intuitive Art of Santo Cervello”, Volumes I, II and V are now available for 40,000 retailers and can be purchased on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and more.

Contact:
St. Cervello
Telephone: 805 868-2409
Email: Santo.Cervello@actorscornercafe.com
https://www.acteurscornercafe.com/

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/d04167e0-8ef4-4108-9231-3d2003cf72af

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Confederate statues of Virginia to move to Black History Museum https://laprairie-shlm.com/confederate-statues-of-virginia-to-move-to-black-history-museum/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 14:29:16 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/confederate-statues-of-virginia-to-move-to-black-history-museum/ Statue of shot dead Robert E. Lee in Richmond, Virginia The statue of Robert E. Lee and other Confederate laws in Richmond, Va., which were struck down last year, will now be turned over to local authorities Black History Museum. The announcement was made last week by Ralph northam (governor, Virginia) and Levar Stoney (Mayor, […]]]>

The statue of Robert E. Lee and other Confederate laws in Richmond, Va., which were struck down last year, will now be turned over to local authorities Black History Museum.

The announcement was made last week by Ralph northam (governor, Virginia) and Levar Stoney (Mayor, Richmond). The decision is now awaiting city council approval. Once approved, the 21-foot-tall statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, along with its 40-foot pedestal, will be moved to the Black History Museum. Eight other Confederate statues will also be moved to the museum and the Virginia Cultural Center.

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam

The Robert E. Lee statue was first examined in the summer of 2020, following the murder of George floyd. Mayor Stoney then announced the removal of Confederate statues from the city’s public spaces. Governor Northam also announced the statue’s removal in June 2020, but the process was halted by the circuit court after a complaint was filed. The lawsuit cited an 1890 document in which the state of Virginia promised to save the statue. However, last September, the state’s Supreme Court granted the governor the power to remove the statue. At the end of December, the statue was removed from its pedestal. Below, an 1887 time capsule was discovered that contained artifacts from the 17e-19e century.

The statue of Lee is removed from the disfigured pedestal.

Speaking to The Associated Press, Stoney said: “Entrusting the future of these monuments and plinths to two of our most respected institutions is the right thing to do.Northam, while speaking to NPR, said: “Symbols matter, and for too long Virginia’s most significant symbols have celebrated the tragic division of our country and the side that fought to keep the institution of slavery alive by any means possible. “

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Protest is personal in Joshua Rashaad McFadden’s Eastman Museum Art Exhibition | Art https://laprairie-shlm.com/protest-is-personal-in-joshua-rashaad-mcfaddens-eastman-museum-art-exhibition-art/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 16:41:15 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/protest-is-personal-in-joshua-rashaad-mcfaddens-eastman-museum-art-exhibition-art/ As a photographer and curator, it is rare that an art exhibition makes me cry. But that’s exactly what happened with “Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On,” a retrospective photography exhibition at the George Eastman Museum. The dark walls and subdued lights of the gallery space attracted me. At the entrance to the […]]]>

As a photographer and curator, it is rare that an art exhibition makes me cry. But that’s exactly what happened with “Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On,” a retrospective photography exhibition at the George Eastman Museum.

The dark walls and subdued lights of the gallery space attracted me. At the entrance to the exhibition is a mirror with the words “BE REAL BLACK FOR ME”.

This imperative served two purposes: to welcome black spectators to a museum that caters to predominantly white artists for predominantly white audiences, and to challenge white spectators to change their mindset. It was a daring, even radical, statement affirming the right presence of black art in a museum setting.

It’s also rare for an artist as young as Joshua Rashaad McFadden – he’s only 31 – to receive a retrospective so early in his career at a gallery like the George Eastman Museum, which tends to recognize artists with portfolios. more extensive.

Click to enlarge

  • PHOTO BY ERICH CAMPING
  • Joshua Rashaad McFadden mingles with attendees from the George Eastman Museum at the opening reception for the photo retrospective “Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On”.

“Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On” is a stunning look at one of contemporary photography’s most provocative black artists, who also happens to be a native of Rochester. The exhibit is on view at the Eastman Museum until June 19.

I started following McFadden’s work during the 2020 social uprising in Rochester following the murder of Daniel Prude. I was obsessively refreshing social media pages, watching pictures and videos of friends and family in the Rochester Police Department tear gas and pepperball assault. McFadden was on the front lines, documenting interactions between protesters and police with live video clips and photographs, and capturing both the astonishing violence and the uplifting response from the community.

“I had to go and document this no matter what,” McFadden said. “I had to do it.”

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"Irony of Black Policeman (Atlanta, Georgia), 2020, from "Troubles in America: Rayshard Brooks." - PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN

  • PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN
  • “Irony of Black Policeman (Atlanta, GA), 2020, from” Unrest in America: Rayshard Brooks “.

McFadden has a lot on his plate, creatively. He had already started teaching at RIT when he began documenting the protests in Rochester. He also covered similar protests in Minneapolis, Atlanta and Washington, DC.

“With this kind of work, no, there is no sleep,” he explained. “The protests took place all day and in the middle of the night until 4 am. So, (I) slept two hours a night all summer, really until this year, because Derek Chauvin’s trial happened this year in April.

“He worked without sleep for a long, long, long time. But the job had to be done.

In the protest photography genre, McFadden’s work often captures the unfiltered emotional responses of protesters.

For McFadden, capturing black grief is only a small part of capturing black life. He considers his projects individually, but admits that because the works sometimes overlap, the images and their stories begin to inform.

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"I relate directly to the plight of black Americans who experience racism in this country," McFadden said. "And so, going out and documenting it was very difficult.  And you will see the intense emotion of the photograph." - PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN

  • PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN
  • “I am directly linked to the plight of black Americans who experience racism in this country,” McFadden said. “And so, going out and documenting that was very difficult. And you will see the intense emotion of the photograph.”

McFadden returned to Rochester in 2018 after several years in Atlanta, where he taught photography at Spelman College, to accept an art residency at the Visual Studies Workshop. He currently teaches at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

From there, he produced “Evidence,” an exhibition that illustrates the breadth of black masculinity and gender through portraits of men alongside those of their fathers or father figures. At the same time, McFadden was motivated by the recent death of his grandfather and produced “Love Without Justice,” an autobiographical photo series that used photos from his family’s archives.

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PHOTO BY ERICH CAMPING

In his portraits of other people, there is a rawness and a desire for deep self-exploration. “I think the job is really me,” he said. “And it’s not really too glamorous or staged. Especially with the archives, it’s very personal. Especially in ‘Love without justice’. I just add to the archive. So I think it’s me, for sure. Completely unfiltered.

McFadden says his personal experience also motivates his photojournalism work.

“Along with other things, like ‘Unrest in America’, and documenting protests across the country, it’s also very personal. I’m directly linked to the plight of black Americans who experience racism in this country,” a- he said. “And so, going out and documenting it was very difficult. And you will see the intense emotion of the photograph. And it is not only because it is a touching moment, but you will see my emotion. in these photographs.

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"I can't breathe: Minneapolis, Minnesota," 2020, from "Troubles in America: George Floyd." - PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN

  • PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN
  • “I Can’t Breathe: Minneapolis, Minnesota,” 2020, from “Unrest in America: George Floyd”.

Exploring the self through the chronicle of black life more broadly has been a constant theme of McFadden’s career.

“It always comes down to this constant referencing image map of itself,” said K. Anthony Jones, art critic and McFadden collaborator. “It becomes self-referential throughout this whole loop. “

“He’s exploring what it means not to have a home in this place,” Jones later said.

Eastman Museum executive director Bruce Barnes acknowledged this in his remarks at the opening of “I Believe I’ll Run On,” saying the exhibit “chronicles the intimacy of black life in the United States. And was “a testament to healing and the protective possibilities of turning in on oneself.”

McFadden wanted his work to elicit a visceral response, the kind of real response that, as he put it, was “unfiltered by the institution in which it exists.”

Click to enlarge
PHOTO BY JASON MILTON

Museums are spaces for ritual practice, housing objects and artefacts revered by the community that supports them. McFadden’s exhibition plays on this, with lighting and colors that incite an almost holy exaltation of the work. Watching exhibit attendees engage in different ways reminded me of the difference between going to church in New York City with my white mother and going to church in South Carolina with my black father: solemn silence versus jubilant reverence.

It is rare that we are able to gift their flowers to artists while they are still in business and even more exceptional when we are able to do so near the start of what appears to be on the way to a meteoric career.

“This is just the start,” McFadden said. “I have so much more work to do and so much more to say.”

Amanda Chestnut is a freelance writer for CITY. Comments on this article can be directed to dkushner@rochester-citynews.com.

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Forbes India – Museum, Art: Iraqi museum restores treasures destroyed by Islamic State jihadists https://laprairie-shlm.com/forbes-india-museum-art-iraqi-museum-restores-treasures-destroyed-by-islamic-state-jihadists/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 13:00:12 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/forbes-india-museum-art-iraqi-museum-restores-treasures-destroyed-by-islamic-state-jihadists/ Mosul museum worker tries to assemble larger artifact with cuneiform inscriptions from shattered fragments at city museum in northern Iraq Image: Zaid AL-Obeidi / AFP LCollapsed by the jihadists, the once famous Iraqi museum in Mosul and its 2,500-year-old treasures have been given a second life thanks to restoration efforts supported by French experts. Ancient […]]]>

Mosul museum worker tries to assemble larger artifact with cuneiform inscriptions from shattered fragments at city museum in northern Iraq
Image: Zaid AL-Obeidi / AFP

LCollapsed by the jihadists, the once famous Iraqi museum in Mosul and its 2,500-year-old treasures have been given a second life thanks to restoration efforts supported by French experts.

Ancient artifacts in the museum were shattered into small pieces when fighters from the Islamic State group seized the northern city of Mosul in 2014 and made it the seat of power for three years.

“We have to separate all the fragments … It’s like a puzzle, you try to recover the pieces which tell the same story”, declared the restorer Daniel Ibled, mandated by the famous Louvre museum, which supports the employees of the Iraqi museums.

“Little by little, you manage to recreate the whole set.”

When IS jihadists were in command, they filmed themselves hammering away pre-Islamic treasures they considered heretical, proudly announcing their rampage in a video posted in February 2015.

The biggest and heaviest artifacts were destroyed for their propaganda, but smaller pieces were sold on black markets around the world.

The scars of their destruction remain today.

On the ground floor of the museum, the foundation’s twisted iron bars pierce a gaping hole.

In other rooms, stones of various sizes are scattered, some bearing engravings of animal paws or wings. Others have inscriptions in cuneiform script.

The smallest of these fragments, no bigger than a fist, are lined up on a table and the experts are busy sorting them out.

For now, their efforts are focused on a winged lion from the city of Nimrud, the jewel of the Assyrian Empire, two “lamassu” – winged bulls with human heads – and the base of the throne of King Ashurnasirpal II.

Giant puzzle

These pieces, many of which date from the first millennium BC, are being revived with funding from the International Alliance for the Protection of Cultural Heritage in Conflict Zones (ALIPH).

Alongside the Louvre, efforts are also being made by the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, which trains the museum’s teams, as well as by the World Monuments Fund, headquartered in New York, which is responsible for restoring the building.

The base of the Assyrian king’s throne, covered in cuneiform writing, seems almost fixed.

Some parts are held together by elastic bands or small metal rings.

“The base of the throne was pulverized in more than 850 pieces,” said museum official Choueib Firas Ibrahim, an expert in Sumerian studies. “We have recovered two-thirds of it.

For some pieces, writing fragments or straight lines help teams put them together like a giant jigsaw puzzle.

“We read the inscriptions on this basis, and we were able to put the pieces back in their place,” said restorer Taha Yassin.

But other pieces without a “flat surface or inscriptions” make them virtually indistinguishable and are more complicated, Yassin added.

Empty spaces

A year after the recapture of Mosul by Iraqi troops in 2017, the museum received an urgent grant in an attempt to restore it to its former glory.

After delays due to the coronavirus pandemic, museum director Zaid Ghazi Saadallah said he hoped restoration work would be completed within five years.

But many gaps will remain and posters on the walls identify the lost items.

“Most of the rooms are destroyed or looted,” Saadallah said.

Iraq has suffered for decades from the looting of its antiquities, especially after the US-led invasion in 2003, as well as during ISIS’s subsequent takeover.

But the current government says it has made repatriation of artifacts a priority.

The Louvre has tasked 20 people to help with restoration efforts, said Ariane Thomas, director of the Louvre’s Near Eastern Antiquities Department.

After three missions this year, seven French experts will take turns in Iraq to guide the restoration process, carried out with around ten museum employees.

Once the restoration work is completed, an online exhibition will be organized to unveil the work.

“When we said that with time, money and know-how, we could bring even the most damaged works back to life, it proves it,” Thomas said.

“Completely destroyed works have started to take shape again.”

Click here to see Forbes India’s full coverage of the Covid-19 situation and its impact on life, business and economy

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Cincinnati Art Museum’s ‘Art After Dark’ Event Celebrates Local Artist Frank Duveneck https://laprairie-shlm.com/cincinnati-art-museums-art-after-dark-event-celebrates-local-artist-frank-duveneck/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 21:18:09 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/cincinnati-art-museums-art-after-dark-event-celebrates-local-artist-frank-duveneck/ Click to enlarge Photo: Francisco Huerta Jr. Inside the Frank Duveneck exhibition This Friday, the Cincinnati Art Museum will host a home edition of “Art after dark” which offers cocktails, music and dance performances, as well as works by local artists past and present. The event, which will take place from 5 p.m. to 9 […]]]>
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Photo: Francisco Huerta Jr.

Inside the Frank Duveneck exhibition

This Friday, the Cincinnati Art Museum will host a home edition of “Art after dark” which offers cocktails, music and dance performances, as well as works by local artists past and present.

The event, which will take place from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. on January 29, is scheduled to honor the local artist Frank Duveneck, whom the museum calls “the most influential painter in Cincinnati history,” with a curator-led virtual tour of the museum’s new exhibit.

The event kicks off with a special cocktail tutorial by mixologist Molly Wellmann. In addition to owning Japp’s craft cocktail bar, Wellmann is a local “drink maker and storyteller” who uses the basics of classic cocktails, some of which date back to the 1700s, to create innovative new drink recipes.

Wellmann has created a cocktail directly inspired by Frank Duveneck called “Foucar à la Kin-kan” to serve at this event. Participants can buy Ingredients or get a take-out kit from Japp’s, which includes ingredients for a drink.

If a malt is more your speed, you can purchase a four-pack of the museum’s recent collaboration with Listermann Brewing Company. The limited edition version includes four different bottle labels that feature famous works by Duveneck.

At 6 p.m., the local dance troupe Pones will perform in the All Flowers Are For Me exhibit. According to its webpage, the gallery uses the manipulation of light to create “complex shadows” that ripple under movement.

At 7 p.m., museum curator Julie Aronson, Ph.D., will guide participants through a brand new presentation of Frank Duveneck: American Master, which is now open until March 28. According to the museum, this is the first exhibition in 30 years that delves into Duveneck’s life and work.

Duveneck has worked with several mediums such as oil paintings, drawings, watercolors, pastels, prints, monotypes and sculptures, all of which will be presented as part of the exhibition.

The exhibition will also feature new research that sheds light on common misconceptions about the artist’s life from the mid-1800s to the early 20th century.

The event will end at 8 p.m. with a one-hour performance by the local indie-pop quartet The Ophelias. This performance will be the group’s first full band livestream and will feature several new songs from their discography.

The event is free and will be streamed live on Facebook Live. Follow the social networks of the Cincinnati Art Museum and event page for more details.

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The Lowe Art Museum’s Mindfulness Art Virtually Combines Painting and Mindfulness Exercises https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-lowe-art-museums-mindfulness-art-virtually-combines-painting-and-mindfulness-exercises/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-lowe-art-museums-mindfulness-art-virtually-combines-painting-and-mindfulness-exercises/ “A Clearing in June” by Charles H. Davis was the subject of the session. Photo credit: Kris Berg Since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, the Lowe Art Museum’s Art of Mindfulness event has taken place weekly on Zoom. Last week, event attendees focused their attention on the oil painting “A Clearing in June” by […]]]>
“A Clearing in June” by Charles H. Davis was the subject of the session. Photo credit: Kris Berg

Since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, the Lowe Art Museum’s Art of Mindfulness event has taken place weekly on Zoom.

Last week, event attendees focused their attention on the oil painting “A Clearing in June” by Charles H. Davis. The free event lasts one hour and features a guided mindfulness exercise with a focus on a painting from the museum’s collection.

Participants performed calming breathing exercises and used the painting’s idyllic pastoral landscape to anchor themselves in the present instead of focusing on external stressors. Hope Torrents, event manager, museum educator and co-founder of The Art of Mindfulness, read Elizabeth Bishop’s poem “An Art” aloud.

The idea of ​​the art of mindfulness, according to Torrents, originated in 2015, when she and Jodi Sypher, a faculty member in Lowe’s education department, contacted UM’s professor of law, Scott Rogers, on leading mindfulness sessions at the museum.

After a few successful years of the Rogers-led program, the museum also hired Alice Lash, a meditation instructor and mindfulness coach who owns Mindfultime in South Miami.

The initial success of the program prompted Torrents and Sypher to consider modifying it to suit its unique museum setting.

“We also wanted to bring the artwork from the Lowe’s collection into practice,” Sypher said. Currently, Lash runs a general mindfulness session once a month, and Sypher, Torrents, or Rogers run an art-focused session the rest of the time.

The program, according to Sypher and Torrents, is unique because of its emphasis on art as well as the degree of audience participation it elicits.

“It’s just about using art as the center of attention, instead of the grass or the sounds or the multitude of other objects that people use,” Torrents said.

“What’s unique about our program is that we do it live and give the virtual community time to think together and ask questions,” Sypher said.

Attendees were asked to enter their reactions to the art and poetry used in the sessions using the Zoom meeting chat feature.

Like most of Lowe’s other programs, The Art of Mindfulness went virtual in 2020 after the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. However, the transition to virtual sessions has actually increased the number and variety of participants.

“When we had it in person, we would have a maximum of twelve people,” Torrents said. “When we started doing it in 2020, at one point we had 70 people. “

Tuesday’s session saw participants from Miami, New York and Milwaukee, but Torrents said the program has extended its reach beyond the United States alone.

“We’ve had people from Brazil, we’ve had people from Europe,” Torrents said. “We even had someone from Ghana. “

When asked why the program appeals to so many people, Sypher believes it is a combination of the accessibility of virtual guided mediation and the sense of oneness the program brings. to the participants.

“People really appreciate being able to be in a community and to practice mindfulness, especially online accessibility,” Sypher said.

Despite the popularity of the program, the museum is still looking to increase attendance, especially from UM’s student body, which program organizers believe is under-represented.

“We would like to involve more students,” Torrents said. “The time at 1:00 am EDT may not be ideal for students. “

“We would like more students to come,” echoed Sypher.

The museum is currently looking for ways to increase the reach of the program with the student body, including changing the length of time it is held. However, until a consensus is reached on what time would work best for students, the program will stay at 1 p.m. on Tuesday.

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The art of the Ulster Museum at the heart of the autumn / winter program https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-art-of-the-ulster-museum-at-the-heart-of-the-autumn-winter-program/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-art-of-the-ulster-museum-at-the-heart-of-the-autumn-winter-program/ NI National Museums has announced an exciting art program for fall and winter. The diverse range of exhibitions showcase local and international artists and explore deep and provocative themes such as identity, loss, isolation and love. Art serves an important purpose, reminding us that we share a universal human experience, evoking deep emotions and allowing […]]]>

NI National Museums has announced an exciting art program for fall and winter.

The diverse range of exhibitions showcase local and international artists and explore deep and provocative themes such as identity, loss, isolation and love.

Art serves an important purpose, reminding us that we share a universal human experience, evoking deep emotions and allowing us to make connections and feel less alone.

Exhibits include: Mysterious Irish Muse by Tissot: New Acquisitions; Silent testimony; Thought of blue sky; New art, new themes, new acquisitions; Mainie Jellett (1897-1944): Translation and rotation and; Royal Academy of Ulster 140 e Annual exhibition.

Hannah Crowdy, curator of National Museums NI, said: “Through our collections, we hope to inspire and educate new audiences, including those who don’t typically visit an art exhibit.

“Everyone is invited to come and visit our space to see first-hand just how diverse and varied the exhibitions are, perhaps allowing people to discover a new appreciation for Impressionism or contemporary art. “

Exhibition at the museum until 2 sd January 2022, the focal point of Tissot’s mysterious Irish Muse: New Acquisitions is “Quiet” by James (Jacques) Joseph Tissot. A new museum acquisition, Quiet represents Kathleen Kelly, Tissot’s mistress, muse and the inspiration for some of his most famous paintings.

Quiet is exhibited with paintings by Cotes, Lavery and Orpen, which contrast the role of societal beauties and the experience of young women who lived a more fragile existence on the outskirts of mainstream society.



The museum also exhibits Silent Testimony, which is returning as part of National Museums NI’s 100 Years Forward program, marking the centenary of the partition and creation of Northern Ireland. The exhibition, which will run until January 2022, features large-scale portraits of internationally renowned artist Colin Davidson.

Each portrait powerfully portrays the personal experiences of the eighteen people who suffered loss during the unrest.

Colin Davidson said, “The silent testimony reveals the individual and collective suffering of these eighteen people in a way words cannot. All ostensibly have different identities but are linked by a unique and shared experience of loss. When creating the portraits I wanted to convey each one first as a human being who had suffered as a result of the conflict in Northern Ireland and silently articulate that experience.

“The shared trauma of these eighteen people remains a powerful reminder of our common humanity. “

French photographer Bernard Lesaing first came to Northern Ireland in 1975 and 1976, taking moving and insightful images of the country at the height of the conflict. He returned more than 40 years later to a very different political landscape. He again based his work on the people he met and their stories, capturing not only striking images but also collecting 21 personal testimonies. This fascinating look at Northern Ireland’s journey, through conflict to more peaceful times, is explored in the Faces and Places exhibition.

Thought of blue sky; New Art, New Themes, New Acquisitions is an exhibition that presents Blue Sky Thinking, 2019 by Patrick Goddard, a piece depicting 180 ring-necked parakeets created from recycled lead.

Acquired by National Museums NI 2020, with help from a grant from the Art Fund, the play addresses themes of migration, identity and the climate emergency, deliberately drawing on current discourse on human migration and border control, as well as the artist’s ecological concerns.

Blue Sky Thinking is on display with works from the Museum of Ulster’s internationally significant sculpture collection, including Birdman by Elisabeth Frink, HOME by Willie Doherty and Silent Echoes, a sound sculpture by Bill Fontana.

Another artist on display is Mainie Jellet – she has been seen as the driving force that brought abstract art to Ireland and the exhibition explores her journey to this point and beyond, celebrating its impact and the placement of women. at the center of Irish modernism. Mainie Jellett (1897-1944): Translation and Rotation will be on display from October 29 to May 2022.

Jellet’s process is revealed throughout the exhibition, with highly regarded works included, alongside paintings and drawings on public display for the first time, showcasing the richness and richness of his short but prolific career and sharing the “Three revolutions” of his artistic practice.

The highly anticipated 140th Annual Royal Ulster Academy Exhibition runs from 29 October to 9 January 2022 and is a highlight of Belfast’s calendar of events.

Founded in 1879, the Royal Ulster Academy of Arts (RUA) is the largest and oldest organization of practicing visual artists in Northern Ireland. Its annual exhibition is a unique platform for renowned artists and emerging talent to showcase their works at the Ulster Museum.

Now in his 140 e year, the exhibition includes around 250 examples of painting, drawing, sculpture, photography and video. Some works explore topical themes such as isolation, social distancing and survival in these strange times. Others share deep messages with hope, humor, passion and integrity.

Hannah Crowdy said: “The RUA exhibit is always a highlight for visitors, showcasing an incredibly diverse range of art and content. We are delighted to welcome the exhibition again, now in its 140 e year, and offer our space to local artists, known and less known, to give their talent a platform and an audience.

“We hope that visitors will enjoy all of the Ulster Museum exhibits over the coming months and that our fall / winter art exhibition program will leave them inspired, with a new appreciation for the power that art has to offer. arouse emotion and conversation. “

Entrance to the Ulster Museum is free.

Advance reservations are recommended for all exhibitions at the Ulster Museum. Tickets can be booked at www.nmni.com

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Ilias Lalaounis jewelry museum art fair from December 3 to 5 https://laprairie-shlm.com/ilias-lalaounis-jewelry-museum-art-fair-from-december-3-to-5/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/ilias-lalaounis-jewelry-museum-art-fair-from-december-3-to-5/ ATHENS – The Ilias Lalaounis Jewelry Museum (ILJM) is presenting its Arts Fair from December 3 to 5 with free entry to all areas of the museum. Participants will have the opportunity to view the remarkable collection which continues to inspire and impress all who visit this unique museum. ILJM is the first museum dedicated […]]]>

ATHENS – The Ilias Lalaounis Jewelry Museum (ILJM) is presenting its Arts Fair from December 3 to 5 with free entry to all areas of the museum. Participants will have the opportunity to view the remarkable collection which continues to inspire and impress all who visit this unique museum.

ILJM is the first museum dedicated to the art of jewelry in Greece and one of the few in the world. ILJM is a non-profit cultural organization certified by the Greek Ministries of Finance and Culture in 1993 and opened to the public in December 1994. The museum acts as an international center for jewelry and decorative crafts, with an emphasis on silver and silverware as well as contemporary studio jewelry.

The Museum is located under the sacred hill of the Acropolis at the foot of the Parthenon in two buildings: the family home of the Lalaounis which was built in 1927 and the jewelry workshop of its founder Ilias Lalaounis which is a completely renovated building from 1925. in 1992. for the spaces of the Museum. The family home has been kept intact and is accessible to visitors as it houses the library and administration. The arrangements of the main space of the museum were designed by Bernard Zehrfuss (1908-1996), the architectural plan was refined and produced by the architect Vassilis Gregoriadis and the museological studies were carried out by Ioanna Lalaouni.

Today, the ILJM’s permanent collection includes historical and contemporary jewelry and decorative arts. The major emphasis of the presentations is given to the 50 collections designed and supervised by Ilias Lalaounis between 1957 and 2002. The presentations are selected to give an overview of the 4,500 jewels and microsculptures that Lalaounis has presented in exhibitions around the world to promote his job. Inspired by the history of world art, the history of ancient Greek art and the social aspects that complement the second half of the 20th century, contemporary technology, nature and children’s drawings, the artist left an important archive of drawings, jewelry tools and mock-ups of special commissions.

Since 2001, the museum collects decorative arts and historical jewelry and enriches its collection with contemporary artistic jewelry from Greek and international artists.

The art fair is open on Friday December 3 from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday 4 and Sunday 5 December from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

All sanitary protocols are followed in accordance with national regulations #staysafe #covidfree.

More information is available online: http://www.lalaounis-jewelrymuseum.gr/.

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Qatar Museums Open-Air Museum Art FIFA World Cup https://laprairie-shlm.com/qatar-museums-open-air-museum-art-fifa-world-cup/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/qatar-museums-open-air-museum-art-fifa-world-cup/ Qatar Museums today announced plans to transform the country into an open-air museum in preparation for the upcoming 2022 FIFA World Cup. From today until the opening of the tournament, the museum will commission and install 40 new facilities across Doha and the country. “The enrichment of public spaces in Qatar with extraordinary works of […]]]>

Qatar Museums today announced plans to transform the country into an open-air museum in preparation for the upcoming 2022 FIFA World Cup.

From today until the opening of the tournament, the museum will commission and install 40 new facilities across Doha and the country. “The enrichment of public spaces in Qatar with extraordinary works of art by artists of all nationalities and origins is a point of pride for our nation,” said Her Excellency Sheikha Al Mayassa bint Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, President of the Qatar museums. Abdulrahman Ahmed Al-Ishaq, director of public art at the institution, added that this would further encourage “dialogue among countless people and provide always accessible sources of inspiration.”

The program will feature a mix of local Qatari talent, alongside a diverse cast of international artists, making the initiative one of the most ambitious art projects in the world. Current highlights include the Dutch artist, the monumental sculpture by Tom Claassen Falcon (2021) which is outside Hamad International Airport. Stay tuned for an array of work ahead over the coming year.

In other art news, James Jean will release a new meticulously crafted screenprint.

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A new mural; Night at the Museum; Art on bricks https://laprairie-shlm.com/a-new-mural-night-at-the-museum-art-on-bricks/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/a-new-mural-night-at-the-museum-art-on-bricks/ Here’s a look at what’s going on in Northwest Arkansas sponsored by 7Up Mini Can Variety Pack. The award-winning Unexpected Project in Fort Smith brings a new mural to downtown. The Unexpected just announced that artist Ben Eine will bring an original new piece of wall art to downtown with a grant from the Division […]]]>

Here’s a look at what’s going on in Northwest Arkansas sponsored by 7Up Mini Can Variety Pack.

The award-winning Unexpected Project in Fort Smith brings a new mural to downtown. The Unexpected just announced that artist Ben Eine will bring an original new piece of wall art to downtown with a grant from the Division of Arkansas Heritage. The work, curated by the Justkids creative house, will be located on Garrison Avenue and work will begin on October 16. Ben’s work will serve as a centerpiece for mental health awareness.

On Thursday, October 14, Art on the Bricks at Rogers is offering something for everyone. The theme for the October Art Walk is “Haunts & Harvest”. Attendees will experience family-friendly indoor and outdoor pop-up art exhibits at more than 20 downtown Rogers locations and are encouraged to wear Halloween and cosplay costumes. You will see visual art and hear live music throughout the event. Start of activities at 4.30 p.m.

This weekend, you are invited to celebrate Justice Parker’s 183rd birthday at the Fort Smith History Museum! Volunteers will lead a session in the “Judge Parker Courtroom” where the “Big Bad Wolf” will argue his case for why he blew up the house. In turn, “The Three Pigs” will take the witness stand. The children will decide who was right and who was wrong. Cupcakes and refreshments will be served after all this choice! The trial will take place on Saturday at 1:00 p.m.

Here is something for adults. The Arkansas Air and Military Museum is having an adults-only party and tickets go quickly. Participants will join the ORB Paranormal team who will this year lead the ghost hunt and search for the ever-moving spirits in the museum! Tickets for “Night at the Museum” cost twenty-five dollars for non-members and only fifteen dollars for members. Tickets include dinner and loot.

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