Museum role – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 16:00:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://laprairie-shlm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-2-150x150.png Museum role – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ 32 32 Crypto Expert B Al Falasi on Meta History Museum’s Role in Raising $100,000 Through NFT Sales to Rebuild Ukraine https://laprairie-shlm.com/crypto-expert-b-al-falasi-on-meta-history-museums-role-in-raising-100000-through-nft-sales-to-rebuild-ukraine/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 10:04:46 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/crypto-expert-b-al-falasi-on-meta-history-museums-role-in-raising-100000-through-nft-sales-to-rebuild-ukraine/ B Al Falasi While this isn’t the first time proceeds from the sale of artwork have gone to good causes, this time around an innovative initiative using cutting-edge technology has caught the world’s attention. In a recent chat with crypto wiz B Al Falasi, we got an in-depth look at the unique philanthropic endeavor. In […]]]>

B Al Falasi

While this isn’t the first time proceeds from the sale of artwork have gone to good causes, this time around an innovative initiative using cutting-edge technology has caught the world’s attention. In a recent chat with crypto wiz B Al Falasi, we got an in-depth look at the unique philanthropic endeavor.

In February 2022, Russia invaded parts of Ukraine, leaving behind destruction of colossal proportions. B Al Falasi quotes a recent Mckinsey article: “Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has caused the greatest humanitarian crisis in Europe since World War II. Not only do they speak of the obvious pain and suffering caused by the lives lost, but millions of people also face serious issues of displacement and loss of livelihoods. As the war rages on, citizens of the world are mobilizing to offer their support in any way they can.

One of the initiatives that people can contribute to is set up by the Ukrainian Ministry of Digital Transformation and the Ministry of Culture. The platform is called Meta History: Museum of War. Driven by innovation, it’s like no other – it’s an NFT museum. First announced in March 2022, the museum features many NFT collections. “We aim to preserve works of art from the war in Ukraine and beyond – immutable, on the blockchain, forever, for future generations.”, says the museum’s official website about the project, “To achieve, a decentralized non-profit organization, a community team of Ukrainian crypto experts and top-notch artists came together.

NFTs, or non-fungible tokens, are unique assets that live on decentralized blockchain technology. Non-fungible means an asset that cannot be exchanged for another of the same value. For example, you cannot exchange a Picasso for the Mona Lisa, even if a sale was possible and they were available at the same value. NFTs are purchased using cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and Ethereum.

B Al Falasi notes that the Meta History Museum not only immortalizes the pain of Ukraine through the heartbreaking works of art, but that it has found a creative way to relieve and support the subjects of these same works of art. . Instead of coercing people into donating and getting nothing in return, the platform offers people around the world a profitable ownership opportunity. Since its inception, the Meta History: Museum has managed to raise $1,290,398. All proceeds went to Aid For Ukraine, a crypto-fund dedicated to the Ukrainian military.

The Meta History: Museum of War is quite methodical in its approach, explains B Al Falasi. The platform begins by gathering highlights and news from the war. It sifts through the hundreds of events and selects those they believe are the most significant or historically significant. Then, NFT artists take these events and create works of art that paint creative, thought-provoking interpretations. Once done, the art is uploaded to their website and available for purchase.

“This blockchain-based and technologically sound initiative of the non-profit organization is not only interesting, novel and ingenious,” says B Al Falasi, “but through it, Meta History: Museum of War has made a bold demonstration unwavering support and obvious caring for the victims of devastating war.

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NEW MUSEUM ROLE FOR JUDITH https://laprairie-shlm.com/new-museum-role-for-judith/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/new-museum-role-for-judith/ Judith Hewitt is the museum’s new curator (East). Judith, previously in charge of Devil’s Porridge Museum, will be responsible for 6 museums in the eastern part of the region: Dumfries Museum and Camera Obscura, Burns House, Robert Burns Center, Old Bridge House, Sanquhar Tolbooth Museum and Annan Museum. Judith was born in Edinburgh and moved […]]]>

Judith Hewitt is the museum’s new curator (East). Judith, previously in charge of Devil’s Porridge Museum, will be responsible for 6 museums in the eastern part of the region: Dumfries Museum and Camera Obscura, Burns House, Robert Burns Center, Old Bridge House, Sanquhar Tolbooth Museum and Annan Museum.

Judith was born in Edinburgh and moved to Derby at the age of 8. She studied history at the University of Nottingham then a master’s degree in local and regional history. She was a high school history teacher in Lincoln for 7 years then, in 2013, moved to Cornwall to manage the Museum of Witchcraft and Magic. Judith directed the Devil’s Porridge Museum from 2018 to 2021.

She is now Curator of Museums for the East of Dumfries and the Galloway Council Museums Department. This includes the Dumfries and Camera Obscura Museum, Burns House, Robert Burns Center Museum, The Old Bridge House, Annan Museum, and Sanquhar Museum.

Judith will be hosting curatorial meetings at sites in the region next month, which will allow her to speak to her informally, ask questions, make suggestions and discuss what’s going on in museums. local. It will also be possible to attend digital meetings if you wish.

To ensure adequate seating and safe occupancy levels during the pandemic, email: dumfries.museum@dumgal.gov.uk or t: 01387 253 374 to reserve a seat and specify the location and date you wish to attend .

Place Museum to be discussed Date and time
Annan Museum Annan Museum Tue, Nov 30, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.
At The Airts, Sanquhar Sanquhar Tollbooth Museum Tue, Dec 7, 6 to 7 p.m.
Dumfries Museum Dumfries Museum and Old Bridge House Thu, Dec 2, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Robert Burns Center, Dumfries Burns House and Robert Burns Center Wed 8,
6 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Online 1
Team meeting All museums: Dumfries Museum, Annan Museum, Sanquhar Museum, Robert Burns Center, Burns House, The Old Bridge House Fri 3 Dec.
3 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Online 2
Team meeting All museums: Dumfries Museum, Annan Museum, Sanquhar Museum, Robert Burns Center, Burns House, The Old Bridge House Thu. December 9, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

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Riley set to educate in new role at Nassau Art Museum – Reuters https://laprairie-shlm.com/riley-set-to-educate-in-new-role-at-nassau-art-museum-reuters/ Wed, 23 Aug 2017 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/riley-set-to-educate-in-new-role-at-nassau-art-museum-reuters/ Charles Riley was named director of the Nassau County Museum of Art on Monday. (Photo courtesy of Nassau County Museum of Art) Charles Riley never expected a career in the art world. Riley, the new director of the Nassau County Museum of Art, has a doctorate. in English Literature from the City University of New […]]]>

Riley set to educate in new role at Nassau Art Museum
Charles Riley was named director of the Nassau County Museum of Art on Monday. (Photo courtesy of Nassau County Museum of Art)

Charles Riley never expected a career in the art world.

Riley, the new director of the Nassau County Museum of Art, has a doctorate. in English Literature from the City University of New York and began writing short essays for artist gallery exhibitions to help people understand the artist’s vision.

He grew up in Manhasset and worked as a reporter for Time Inc. covering the art market and Washington, DC, for Fortune Magazine. When Riley was editor of Art and Auction, he said he realized the financial side of art was not his passion and he focused on celebrating artists.

“The artist has the main word,” Riley said. “When I was doing a catalog trial or doing an exhibition, I would say, ‘What are your intentions? But what did you have in mind?’ Before I start making assumptions and projecting my own feelings onto your work and who you are, I would always let the artist have the first and last say.

Although new to the role, Riley said he had a number of ideas and aspirations for his first year as head of the museum. Riley recently published his 32nd art book, “Free as Gods: How the Jazz Age Reinvented Modernism,” and said he would like to present a Jazz Age show at the museum.

He said he was eager to start announcing new exhibits and events, but had yet to meet with various committees and administrators to finalize details.

Among Riley’s books is “Color Codes: Modern Theories of Color in Philosophy, Painting and Architecture, Literature, Music, and Psychology”, which examines how different professions view color.

“When I walk around the museum, I’m very drawn to the Old Masters,” Riley said. “I spent a lot of time working on color and color theory, so I was always very drawn to not only the Impressionists, who I think were among the great colorists, but also the Fauves. “

Fauvism is a group of early 20th century modern artists whose works emphasize strong color over the realistic values ​​held by Impressionism.

As a former professor for 30 years at CUNY and Clarkson University in Potsdam, Riley has a love for teaching and wants to educate everyone about the beauty of all kinds of art, from classics to contemporary and everything else.

“I like to learn in public. I love learning not just about art, but also how art relates to time and place,” Riley said. “All of my enthusiasm is genuine, and it’s enthusiasm for something that feels new and fascinating.

“When I pick up a book on art, I’m fascinated because I’m learning. Visitors who come to learn will also enjoy some of this, just learning with me. »

Throughout his career, Riley befriended a number of artists and said he admired their unique vision of the world and their ability to physically express that vision.

“I love going to the studios. I never know what I’m going to see. I love the way of thinking,” Riley said. “It’s so different from the business world and the journalistic world or the academic world , and my enthusiasm for it is very genuine. I don’t want to make all artists heroes, but I really admire them and their place in our society.

“It’s something that I maybe put on a pedestal a bit, but I want my love for it to be passed on to my visitors.”

Riley, 59, said that although he is delighted with the new position, he is not looking for a job.

“When [the position was offered], it happened at the right time in my life. I am old and my days in class have been wonderful. There were over 30 good years in there, and I was ready for a change,” Riley said. “I know this museum very well. I’ve lectured here, been a commissioner here, came here as a resident of Nassau County. When they said they could use me, I was happy to say “use me!”

Riley’s predecessor, Karl Willers, ran the museum for seven years and is credited with recently helping to open the Manes Family’s new Art and Education Center. The museum declined to say what led to his departure.

Riley recently lost his mother, Isabel, and said he often saw her caring spirit in volunteers and guides and knew he was on the right path.

“I do what my mother taught me to do, which is to recognize the power of art and say thank you to where I grew up,” he said.

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