Museum stand – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ Fri, 25 Nov 2022 08:01:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://laprairie-shlm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-2-150x150.png Museum stand – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ 32 32 Australasia’s only harness racing museum facing a bulldozer to make way for parking https://laprairie-shlm.com/australasias-only-harness-racing-museum-facing-a-bulldozer-to-make-way-for-parking/ Fri, 25 Nov 2022 07:14:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/australasias-only-harness-racing-museum-facing-a-bulldozer-to-make-way-for-parking/ Provided Hall of Fame President Gilbert Myles in a corner dedicated to New Zealand’s first millionaire, Cardigan Bay, who is buried at the front of the museum. The indebted Auckland Trotting Club is set to sell the family’s silverware, but has faced opposition in its latest attempt to demolish Australasia’s only harness racing museum to […]]]>
Hall of Fame President Gilbert Myles in a corner dedicated to New Zealand's first millionaire, Cardigan Bay, who is buried at the front of the museum.

Provided

Hall of Fame President Gilbert Myles in a corner dedicated to New Zealand’s first millionaire, Cardigan Bay, who is buried at the front of the museum.

The indebted Auckland Trotting Club is set to sell the family’s silverware, but has faced opposition in its latest attempt to demolish Australasia’s only harness racing museum to make way for parking.

ATC reduced its debt from $122 million to $73 million last month as it finally finalized the sale of a large plot of land bordering Green Lane Road, but now must find alternative parking spaces for Alexandra customers Park.

Having just cut down a stand of century-old trees behind the stables to park, he now wants to get rid of the Noel Taylor New Zealand Trotting Hall Of Fame, which he acknowledges on his own website as “one of the best in his gender in the world”.

The building houses priceless memorabilia dating back to the first Auckland Trotting Cup won by Commodore in 1890 and is visited by people from all over the world, also hosting bus tours and school groups since it opened in 1997.

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Former ATC President Noel Taylor donated $650,000 to the club to build the museum and ensure the impressive collection is housed in a secure facility accessible to the public.

The Hall Of Fame has a legally binding agreement to operate there for the lease of peppercorns for $1 a year, with no termination date, but the ATC is now challenging the lease, despite having already accepted payment for the next 50 years.

Hall of Fame chairman Gilbert Myles, a former ATC vice-chairman, said he was appalled at how the club’s interim general manager Rod Croon misled members during the recent annual general meeting, claiming the club owned the building because it paid back the $650,000. to Taylor’s estate after his death in 1999.

Club officials at the time are adamant the money was never returned and a signed deed between Taylor, the club and the Hall of Fame makes it clear that Taylor signed a codicil, amending his will. for the sum to be an inheritance, so the club did not have to repay any money upon his death.

Myles said it would be a travesty if the museum was bulldozed, yet another victim of the failed ATC construction project which lost $108m and now sees the club forced to sell its training facility in Pukekohe to ward off the banks.

The Hall Of Fame museum is threatened with being demolished for the parking lot.

Provided

The Hall Of Fame museum is threatened with being demolished for the parking lot.

Myles suspects the land the Hall of Fame sits on could be the next to be sold, as the club recently registered the area as a new title.

“It wasn’t the Hall of Fame that brought the ATC to its knees, so why should it suffer?

“It’s not the Auckland Hall Of Fame, it’s the New Zealand Hall Of Fame and people from all over Australasia have donated money and memorabilia to help set it up.”

A separate incorporated company, the Hall Of Fame had spent a great deal of money and unpaid time building and maintaining the collection.

It now displays myriad items like framed racing silks from Monte Carlo, winner of New Zealand’s first trotting cup in 1904, carts used by champion pacer Young Quinn and legendary rider Ces Donald, tributes at Cardigan Bay, which is buried behind the building, valuable gold and silver cups, books, journals and newspapers. He recently transferred 1,200 race meetings from film to disc for visitors to see.

Myles fears for the future of the treasures if ATC manages to move pieces of the collection to a seedy, seldom-visited back room in the grandstand and distribute selected trophies throughout the building, such as the reception area and Alex Bar.

The last time he agreed to let the club display cups outside the museum, they disappeared, he said.

What the ATC was proposing should be of concern to harness racing fans across the country, he said. No other harness museum existed in the southern hemisphere.

The thoroughbred code had even failed in attempts to build a museum in Ellerslie.

Although museum committee chair Wendy Pye sponsored and unveiled plans in 2006 for a state-of-the-art facility, the necessary $4 million in funding did not materialize.

Auckland Racing Club’s extensive collection is now stored in boxes.

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Scottish Maritime Museum Christmas Market dates and times confirmed https://laprairie-shlm.com/scottish-maritime-museum-christmas-market-dates-and-times-confirmed/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 14:06:31 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/scottish-maritime-museum-christmas-market-dates-and-times-confirmed/ CRAFTERS, artisans and small businesses across Ayrshire are set to put their wares up for sale at a special Christmas market next weekend. The Scottish Maritime Museum event returns on the weekend of Saturday and Sunday 3rd and 4th December, with a host of goodies and gifts from local artisans, artisans and small businesses on […]]]>

CRAFTERS, artisans and small businesses across Ayrshire are set to put their wares up for sale at a special Christmas market next weekend.

The Scottish Maritime Museum event returns on the weekend of Saturday and Sunday 3rd and 4th December, with a host of goodies and gifts from local artisans, artisans and small businesses on sale at the sprawling Linthouse site on Irvine Harbor.

Visitors will enjoy a wide selection of arts, crafts and products ranging from home decor, handmade bags and jewelry, art and photography to children’s clothing, baskets, fabric scarves silk, soaps, candles, Christmas decorations and cards, pet accessories, eco-friendly alternatives for the home and much more. After.

In addition to the market, festive “Make and Take” children’s craft sessions will take place throughout the day. Visitors can register for free sessions, suitable for children aged 6 and over, at the site reception.

Merchandise includes stunning landscapes and seascapes by 2artistans Paint & Pixels of Troon, original artwork by artist Julia Griffin and hand-carved wooden crafts made on the west coast of Scotland by Glenwoodcraft.

Visitors will also find beautiful handcrafted jewelery by Caroles Fancies of Kilmarnock, Crazy for Ruthie Jewelery of Cumnock and one-of-a-kind, affordable pieces done in fluid acrylic paint by June Rorison Art.

Eco-friendly gifts include natural gin-inspired cosmetic bars by Ayrshire’s Bathtub Gin Care.

Also look for high-quality baby and children’s clothing and accessories from Dalry’s Kiddiewink shop, Dalrymple Knits, who donate profits to Dalrymple Parish Church, and author Dane Love, who has written over 30 books on Scottish subjects, with a particularly strong accent. on Ayrshire.

Saturday treats also include OffcutCraftCo with its festive wall hangings, streamers, advent calendars and decorations, handmade dog accessories from Poppy Monsters Collars, handmade handbags and housewares. handmade by Rags to Bags, gifts by Arty Party Crafts of Ardrossan and beach art by Just Dive of Paisley. .

After all that shopping, visitors can refuel with delicious cakes from Little Birdhouse Bakes and refreshments at the Linthouse Coffee Bar.

Those who want a more extensive menu can head to the museum’s ‘Puffers Café’ which overlooks Irvine Harborside.

Over the weekend, visitors can view the museum’s latest exhibition which explores the forgotten history of industrial whaling in Scotland, ‘All mortal greatness is but disease’.

Exhibition artist Caroline Hack will also discuss with visitors her work in print, textile and handmade book formats and her research visits to whaling sites and museums across Britain, Europe, America and Canada.

Christopher Woodland, Commercial Director of the Scottish Maritime Museum, said: “We are delighted to announce the return of the popular Christmas Market and we have a fantastic display of produce for visitors as well as family fun for those who come. with children.

“With free entry and stalls set out in the expansive Linthouse, the Christmas Market is perfect for stress-free Christmas shopping and a great opportunity to support local businesses and makers.”

The event takes place inside the Linthouse building on Harbor Road between 10am and 4pm on both dates. Free entry.

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The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao celebrates its 25th anniversary with a projection-mapping show https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-guggenheim-museum-bilbao-celebrates-its-25th-anniversary-with-a-projection-mapping-show/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 05:02:15 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-guggenheim-museum-bilbao-celebrates-its-25th-anniversary-with-a-projection-mapping-show/ The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao has announced that from Monday, November 21, members of the public will be able to reserve tickets for Immersions, a free, large-scale light mapping, sound and projection show designed as the grand finale of the celebrations of the 25th anniversary of the Museum. This immersive experience will take place in the […]]]>

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao has announced that from Monday, November 21, members of the public will be able to reserve tickets for Immersions, a free, large-scale light mapping, sound and projection show designed as the grand finale of the celebrations of the 25th anniversary of the Museum. This immersive experience will take place in the Atrium from December 3 to 11. It is sponsored by Seguros Bilbao, administrator of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao since its opening in 1997, which thus reiterates its longstanding commitment to support the activity of the Museum. Seguros Bilbao is part of Grupo Catalana Occidente (GCO), one of the leading companies in the Spanish insurance and credit insurance sector in the world.

On these days, the Museum will close its doors at 6 p.m., one hour earlier than usual. Several slots will be available to enjoy the event: 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8:30 p.m., 9:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. (access 20 minutes before). On the eve of public holidays, i.e. December 3, 5, 7 and 10, an additional time slot will be available at 11:30 p.m., so that as many people as possible can see the show.

Tickets must be reserved in advance on the Museum’s website, https://www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus/actividades/immersions, and members of the general public can reserve theirs from 9 a.m. on November 21 (Friends of the Museum can book from 17 November). You can also call (+34) 94 555 1380 Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Immersion keep on reflections, the spectacular projection mapping show on the facade of the building designed by Frank Gehry, which took place in 2017 to mark the 20th anniversary of the museum. Through Immersionthe story of the museum told outside the building moves inside, using the organic forms of the Atrium as a canvas.

“The randomness of the curves is designed to catch the light,” Frank Gehry said of the Museo Guggenheim Bilbao building.

Retracing the museum’s most important milestones throughout history and brought to life by the same spectacular soundtrack, Immersion will place the audience at the center of a unique spectacle of captivating sound, light and projection, taking viewers from mere observers to an all-encompassing sensory experience.

Immersion is the latest project from British design studio 59 Productions, which has created reflections in 2017 and won numerous awards for producing spectacular works for some of the world’s most iconic venues, such as the Tower of London, the National Theater and Royal Opera House in London, the Metropolitan Opera and the Nations Headquarters United in New York, the Sydney Opera House and the Salzburg Festival.

His most recent cultural projects include audiovisual design and interactive exhibit design at the Bob Dylan Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma; Leonardo: Discover a Masterpiece at the National Gallery in London, an immersive exploration of the painter’s genius and practice; a video installation on the history of the Baroque at Hampton Court Palace in London; and a map projection at Qasr Al Watan Palace in Abu Dhabi, commissioned by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism.

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Off the Shelf: When brands come to life at the Brand Museum https://laprairie-shlm.com/off-the-shelf-when-brands-come-to-life-at-the-brand-museum/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 15:49:38 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/off-the-shelf-when-brands-come-to-life-at-the-brand-museum/ Here at Trademark Museum in Notting Hill, celebrating arts, heritage and culture is an interactive experience. Living Brands is a multi-sensory outreach program designed to encourage memories through creative activities and storytelling. As a certified dementia-friendly venue, all visitors have access to over 200 years of consumer culture ranging from toys, fashion, food and anything […]]]>

Here at Trademark Museum in Notting Hill, celebrating arts, heritage and culture is an interactive experience.

Living Brands is a multi-sensory outreach program designed to encourage memories through creative activities and storytelling. As a certified dementia-friendly venue, all visitors have access to over 200 years of consumer culture ranging from toys, fashion, food and anything found in the kitchen or laundry room of your mother. Some of the best reactions were from attendees standing up and dancing to jingles of advertisements. Objects, sounds and smells trigger reactions.

We are structuring our programs to be replicable so that more groups can use them and hopefully more and more museums as well. However, the reactions, stories and shared memories make each event self-contained. It’s a valuable experience for everyone involved and we look forward to developing it further and providing resources to everyone involved in this very diverse community.

Living Brands is a specialized program offering awareness sessions in care homes, drop-in centers, community hubs, memory cafes, and more. Using our carefully curated memory boxes, filled with replica 20th century packaging and products, we can recreate memories while encouraging creative discussions and artistic pursuits using our multi-sensory approach which has proven to be beneficial for the mental and social well-being.

Our new multi-sensory experience will be available to all new and returning visitors to the Museum this fall capturing the sights and sounds of the 20th century. Launching on 8 October 2022 is a new temporary exhibition called Aide-Mémoire: Shopping Lists which showcases the wacky and wild shopping habits of people across the UK Our new exhibition shows the collection of over 200 shopping lists discarded since 2016 by collector Lucy Ireland Gray in Hertfordshire. Since then, friends and family have donated lists from around the world – although collection stalled slightly during the nationwide shutdowns when supermarket cleanliness became excessive and Lucy was reluctant to collect the abandoned lists. What makes shopping lists so special is not so much the content, but the way they are written, what they are written about, and the personal notes sent to the shopper. Reading them is a personal and emotional insight into the person behind the list.

Enjoy walking down memory lane this fall at Trademark Museum.

By: Abby Pendlebury, Community Development Project Manager for Living Brands

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Service returns to museum – The Australian Jewish News https://laprairie-shlm.com/service-returns-to-museum-the-australian-jewish-news/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 03:52:38 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/service-returns-to-museum-the-australian-jewish-news/ NSW Governor Margaret Beazley said the Prayer for Service Members, laid a wreath and presented awards to young people last Sunday at the NSW Association of Jewish Service and Ex-Service Men and Women (NAJEX) since 2019. Held at the Sydney Jewish Museum (SJM), the well-attended service was introduced by Great Synagogue Rabbi Dr Benjamin Elton, […]]]>

NSW Governor Margaret Beazley said the Prayer for Service Members, laid a wreath and presented awards to young people last Sunday at the NSW Association of Jewish Service and Ex-Service Men and Women (NAJEX) since 2019.

Held at the Sydney Jewish Museum (SJM), the well-attended service was introduced by Great Synagogue Rabbi Dr Benjamin Elton, who revealed a new member of his congregation, a man in his 30s, had served in the Australian Defense Force, in peacekeeping operations in the Solomon Islands.

“It can be easy for the general public to mistakenly think that commemorations such as today’s are only about events long, long ago,” Rabbi Elton said.

“Truly, there are veterans of all ages, as we are reminded every year at this service, when they are asked to stand.

“Today’s service is not an exercise in history, but in memory…and as a Jewish community, we are uniquely trained to do just that.”

Prayers, wreath laying, Ode to the Dead recital, lighting of memorial lights, the Last Post performed by bugler Samara Freedman of Moriah College, and a minute’s silence in memory of fallen Diggers, were moving elements of the service.

Guest speaker Kevin Sumption, CEO of the SJM and former CEO of the Australian Maritime Museum – whose father served in Britain’s Royal Air Force – reflected on a restoration project he led of Australia’s only floating war memorial. ‘Australia, the wooden ship the Krait, moored in Darling Harbour.

The boat was used in two daring secret raids, in 1943 and 1944, aimed at undermining Japanese ships in Singapore harbour, but the second, Operation Rimau, proved disastrous when their cover was destroyed.

“Of the 23 men who set out from Exmouth in Western Australia for a 4,000km journey on this boat, none were due to return,” Sumption said.

At the end of the service, Governor Beazley presented the 2022 NAJEX Youth Leadership Awards to a selected student from each of Sydney’s Jewish schools.

The recipients were Tanna Segal (Mount Sinai College), Chana Shapiro (Kesser Torah College), Bailey Perlstein (Moriah College), Edward Schamschula (Masada College), and Eden Levit (Emanuel School).

NAJEX President Roger Selby said, “It’s so nice to have so many young people attending this service – Jewish students at the 3rd Rose Bay Judean Scouts. We want you to know how important this is and how grateful we are.

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Photos of the Pearl Harbor bombing donated to the Museum of the British Columbia Interior https://laprairie-shlm.com/photos-of-the-pearl-harbor-bombing-donated-to-the-museum-of-the-british-columbia-interior/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/photos-of-the-pearl-harbor-bombing-donated-to-the-museum-of-the-british-columbia-interior/ A small but powerful collection of photographs depicting the December 7, 1941 bombardment of United States Navy battleships at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii is on display at the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin in Williams Lake. One of the six photographs shows dozens of people jumping from a battleship after it was shelled and another shows […]]]>

A small but powerful collection of photographs depicting the December 7, 1941 bombardment of United States Navy battleships at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii is on display at the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin in Williams Lake.

One of the six photographs shows dozens of people jumping from a battleship after it was shelled and another shows a group of men standing outside the barracks watching the bombardment, including a man below -clothes.

The photographs and a photo enlarger belonged to the late Joe Fetters Sr. who moved to the Cariboo with his wife Louise, son Joseph Ernest Jr. and daughter Marla Anne in 1955.

Fetters Sr. died in December 2010 at the age of 95 and Louise on July 11, 2011 at the age of 93.

Joe Fetters Jr. and his wife Kathy discovered the photographs over the past two years and decided to donate the enlarger and reprints of the photographs to the museum.

“Dad mostly photographed flowers and landscapes, so we were surprised to find the Pearl Harbor photos,” said Fetters Jr., who lives with Kathy in the last house his parents owned in Russet Bluff.

Museum board chair Laura Zimmerman said the museum is grateful for the donation and is always grateful when community members donate items of historical value.

“We respect all veterans who served then and now,” Zimmeran said.

Joe Fetters Sr. was stationed as a civilian at Naval Station Pearl Harbor from 1941 until returning to the United States in 1944.

He was a welder, but also took pictures and enlarged them for the military to send home.

In an interview with the Tribune in 1994, he said that on the morning of the attack on December 7, 1941, they initially thought the low-flying aircraft was performing a friendly aircraft maneuver.

He set about going to breakfast after finishing a long night shift.

“At the first detonations, he and everyone else realized the planes overhead weren’t American. They all panicked,” the 1994 article noted. eruption when a nearby destroyer was hit directly and its magazine exploded.”

Only one of the nine battleships escaped without damage, Fetters Sr. told the reporter.

Fetters Sr. was born and raised near Ellensberg, WA. He and Louise met in high school and were married on January 1, 1944 while he was on a month’s leave from Pearl Harbor.

After the war, he started a timber business with his brother. Eventually, they moved their business to the Horsefly region of the Cariboo.

While her brother returned to Washington, Fetters Sr. and his family remained.

Eventually they moved to Williams Lake in 1960 and purchased the land known as Russet Bluff to develop a housing estate.

In a 2003 interview, Louise said her husband built all the roads and put in place the water system in Russet Bluff.

Fetters Jr. worked overseas as an engineer for many years and moved back to Williams Lake with Kathy in 1995 and they helped her parents with development and eventually finished it.

His sister Marla lives in Arizona.

The photograph enlarger ran on a generator at the Fetters’ home when they lived in Horsefly, he recalls. Regarding the Pearl Harbor photographs, Fetters Jr. said he wished he had asked his father more about that time in his life.

“He didn’t really talk about it.”

The Fetters also donated copies of the photographs to the Horsefly Museum.


monica.lamb-yorski@wltribune.com
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Monmouth County Museum of Jewish Heritage presents An Afternoon with David Levy https://laprairie-shlm.com/monmouth-county-museum-of-jewish-heritage-presents-an-afternoon-with-david-levy/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 14:22:26 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/monmouth-county-museum-of-jewish-heritage-presents-an-afternoon-with-david-levy/ NEW | FEATURES | PREVIEWS | EVENTS originally published: 10/11/2022 (FREEHOLD, NJ) — The Monmouth County Museum of Jewish Heritage presents An Afternoon with David Levy on Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 2 p.m. Admission is $5 for Museum members, $7 for non-members. Levy’s presentation will focus on observing, analyzing and evaluating his art: an […]]]>
NEW | FEATURES | PREVIEWS | EVENTS



originally published: 10/11/2022

(FREEHOLD, NJ) — The Monmouth County Museum of Jewish Heritage presents An Afternoon with David Levy on Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 2 p.m. Admission is $5 for Museum members, $7 for non-members. Levy’s presentation will focus on observing, analyzing and evaluating his art: an art that has evolved over fifty years: from optical art to hard-edged figurative painting, and after a hiatus of forty -two years, he returned to optical art and moving towards abstract geometric painting.

Spaces are limited, so book early for this delicious in-person and Zoom program by visiting our website at www.jhmomc.org, or by calling 732-252-6990. You won’t want to miss it!

Funding was made possible in part by a general operating support grant from the New Jersey Historical Commission, a division of the Department of State, through grant funds administered by the Monmouth County Historical Commission.

The Museum of Jewish Heritage is located in Mounts Corner Shopping Center, 310 Mounts Corner Drive, Freehold, NJ, at the corner of Route 537 and Wemrock Road (between CentraState Medical Center and Freehold Raceway Mall). It is on the second floor of the historic Levi Solomon Barn. The JHMOMC is a tax-exempt organization under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Now open to visitors by appointment, the Museum is accessible to people with disabilities and assisted listening. Mandatory masks and vaccines.

The Museum’s Board of Directors denounces racism and all forms of violence against any group, ethnicity or race, and supports any targeted community.

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Advertise with New Jersey Stage for $50 to $100 per month, click here for info


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‘Some of our heroes’: Calgary museum salutes veterans in a new way this Remembrance Day – Calgary https://laprairie-shlm.com/some-of-our-heroes-calgary-museum-salutes-veterans-in-a-new-way-this-remembrance-day-calgary/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 00:33:02 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/some-of-our-heroes-calgary-museum-salutes-veterans-in-a-new-way-this-remembrance-day-calgary/ A Calgary museum is looking forward to inviting the public to a Remembrance Day ceremony again this week. This comes as new exhibits at the facility pay tribute to the service of Canada’s military veterans. The Hangar Flight Museum in northeast Calgary will hold its Remembrance Day ceremony on Friday, November 11. Read more: Former […]]]>

A Calgary museum is looking forward to inviting the public to a Remembrance Day ceremony again this week. This comes as new exhibits at the facility pay tribute to the service of Canada’s military veterans.

The Hangar Flight Museum in northeast Calgary will hold its Remembrance Day ceremony on Friday, November 11.

Read more:

Former soldier launches ‘Heroes Lager’ to support fellow veterans in Calgary

Among the participants is John Melbourne, a retired pilot who served in the Royal Canadian Air Force.

“A big part of Canada’s history is our military history, and the thousands and thousands of men and women who gave their lives to this country,” Melbourne said.

Attendees and participants will salute this sacrifice in the first large-scale public Remembrance Day ceremony since 2019.

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“We are very pleased this year to have Remembrance Day service back to normal,” said Brian Desjardins of the Hanger Flight Museum.

Read more:

New thrift store in Calgary helps military veterans ‘start a new life’

Those attending the event can explore new exhibits: the first items unpacked as Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame leaves its longtime home in Wetaskiwin, Alberta. and move into the Hangar Flight Museum.

“A lot of these planes you see here were flown by our Hall of Fame inductees, some of our heroes,” Hall of Famer Jody Weyman said. “It goes without saying that the two come together.”

The Memorial Day Ceremony at the Hangar Flight Museum begins at 10:30 a.m. on Friday, with the facility’s doors opening to the public at 9:30 a.m.

“Remembrance Day means a lot,” Melbourne said. “The only thing is that we should remember our people not just one day but every day of the year, and just thank our lucky stars for living in a country like ours.”

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Kengo Kuma pays homage to Japanese woodworking traditions with a striking museum facade https://laprairie-shlm.com/kengo-kuma-pays-homage-to-japanese-woodworking-traditions-with-a-striking-museum-facade/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 18:30:23 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/kengo-kuma-pays-homage-to-japanese-woodworking-traditions-with-a-striking-museum-facade/ As pedestrians and motorists pass the new British Antiquities Museum (BAM) in Kamakura, Japan, the building changes before their eyes. The undulating wooden hinoki front is carved in a 3D polygonal pattern inspired by the traditional craftsmanship of Kamakura-bori, a form of lacquerware made by carving patterns into the wood and then lacquering it with […]]]>

As pedestrians and motorists pass the new British Antiquities Museum (BAM) in Kamakura, Japan, the building changes before their eyes. The undulating wooden hinoki front is carved in a 3D polygonal pattern inspired by the traditional craftsmanship of Kamakura-bori, a form of lacquerware made by carving patterns into the wood and then lacquering it with layers of color.

Wavy facade designed by Kengo Kuma for the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

Wavy facade designed by Kengo Kuma for the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

Wavy facade designed by Kengo Kuma for the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

Zoom on the wavy patterns of the wooden facade of Kengo Kuma for the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, inspired by the traditional Japanese craftsmanship of Kamakura-bori.

Zoom on the wavy patterns of the wooden facade of Kengo Kuma for the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, inspired by the traditional Japanese craftsmanship of Kamakura-bori.

The high and low points of the installation seem to move as they catch the light from different angles, creating a dynamic, almost kinetic effect. Designed by famous Japanese architect Kengo Kumathe British Antique Museum opened in September 2022, honoring the close relationship between the city of Kamakura and Britain.

London taxi on the first floor of the new British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

London taxi on the first floor of the new British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

Georgian-era harp on display at the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

Georgian-era harp on display at the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

Just a minute’s walk from Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine and a seven-minute walk from Kamakura Station, BAM exhibits British antiquities collected over the years by museum director Masaomi Dobashi. The museum consists of four floors, each representing a different era and theme. The first floor is the museum shop, with a London taxi and a telephone box. On the second floor, visitors will find Georgian-era antiques, including leather trunks, red cloaks and bearskin hats worn by the Royal Guard.

Sherlock Holmes memorabilia and antiques displayed on the third floor of the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

Sherlock Holmes memorabilia and antiques displayed on the third floor of the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

Replica of the Sherlock Holmes study displayed in the new British Antique Museum in Kamakura.

Replica of the Sherlock Holmes study displayed in the new British Antique Museum in Kamakura.

Entrance to the study of Sherlock Holmes at the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

Entrance to the study of Sherlock Holmes at the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

On the third floor, visitors enter the world of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s novels with a Sherlock Holmes-themed exhibit that recreates the fictional detective’s study and living space down to the smallest detail. The museum explains that “IAt the front, an armchair invites customers in, and the gourd-shaped gasojin (sparkling water device) that appears in Holmes’ story, along with antique microscopes and physics and chemistry equipment, are reproduced as they were at the time. ”

Extra-large gramophone made in 1935, on display at the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

Extra-large gramophone made in 1935, on display at the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

Notable items on the museum’s Victorian-themed fourth floor include a John Broadwood & Sons piano, an extra-large gramophone made in 1935, a fireplace from a Kensington mansion and a stained glass window depicting an image of Queen Victoria.

“As a connection between Kamakura and England, there is the National Trust movement which started in England during the Victorian era,” Dobashi explains on the BAM website. “It is about the permanent preservation of historically significant land and assets through donations, and many scenic spots have been preserved as heritage. Kamakura is where the idea of ​​the National Trust has was first introduced in Japan. ‘Kamakura’ is linked to the desire to cherish the good old British things, and the wonderful cultural heritage is still inherited.

Collection of British antiquities on display at the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

Collection of British antiquities on display at the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

The design process of the British Antique Museum by Kuma is documented in the book Kengo Kuma: creation of a small British museum of antiquities in Kamakura by Masaomi Dobashi, revealing more details about the links between Kamakura, Britain, and Kuma, who also designed V&A Dundeea branch of the Victoria & Albert Museum of London located in Dundee, Scotland.

Night view of the corrugated wooden facade of Kengo Kuma for the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

Night view of the corrugated wooden facade of Kengo Kuma for the British Antique Museum in Kamakura, Japan.

British antiques and modern electric cars are on display here, and you could say it’s a timeless fusion of old and new,” says Kuma. “This time, the British Antique Museum BAM, which stands on the approach to the historic Dankazura of Kamakura, is lined with pure antiquities that have absorbed more than 100 years of time collected by Mr. Dobashi. In this sense, I thought that the design of the building should be as pure as possible. After repeated deliberations, we eliminated all windows and simplified, adopting a facade inspired by Kamakura-bori, which symbolizes the traditional culture of Kamakura.

The post office Kengo Kuma pays homage to Japanese woodworking traditions with a striking museum facade first appeared on Dornob.

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Baltimore Museum’s Great Migration Exhibit Gives Artist Laurel Chance to “Let Go of the Past” and Heal Family Bonds – Baltimore Sun https://laprairie-shlm.com/baltimore-museums-great-migration-exhibit-gives-artist-laurel-chance-to-let-go-of-the-past-and-heal-family-bonds-baltimore-sun/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 08:21:39 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/baltimore-museums-great-migration-exhibit-gives-artist-laurel-chance-to-let-go-of-the-past-and-heal-family-bonds-baltimore-sun/ Some journeys begin on foot, with a frightened look over the shoulder and a rush into the night. But Larry W. Cook Jr.’s great migration began with the click of his camera lens. In 2019, in a devastating single year, the 36-year-old photographer and assistant professor at Howard University lost two people he loved dearly: […]]]>

Some journeys begin on foot, with a frightened look over the shoulder and a rush into the night. But Larry W. Cook Jr.’s great migration began with the click of his camera lens.

In 2019, in a devastating single year, the 36-year-old photographer and assistant professor at Howard University lost two people he loved dearly: the single mother who raised him, and his younger brother and best friend. So Cook Jr. took his camera and went in search of the only surviving person from his biological family – his father, Larry W. Cook Sr., who had been absent from his sons’ lives for most of of their childhood.

“My younger brother, Kevin, and I used to see him maybe once or twice a year,” said Cook Jr., who lives in Laurel. “I had a lot of anger inside, to the point where I built a wall to protect myself.”

As Cook Jr. prepared his work for “A Movement in Every Direction: Legacies of the Great Migration”, the new group exhibition at Baltimore Art Museum, the trauma inflicted on five generations of her male ancestors over nearly two centuries gradually revealed itself.

Through photographs and letters, Cook Jr. traces how social forces forcing some 6 million Americans from their homes in the South to resettle in cities in the North, a historical period known as the Great Migration, conspired – and failed – to tear apart a Black family.

His own.

“I made a promise to let go of the past,” Cook Jr. wrote in a letter to his father that is part of the exhibit. “And maybe together we can help each other heal.”

Cook Jr. is one of 12 artists who have received commissions to create photographs, paintings, films and sculptures that explore the impact of the diaspora, which occurred between 1915 and 1970. In some cases , whole families left their homes in the South and traveled together. . But often only one family member left, usually a man who had been threatened with racial violence, fleeing for his life and leaving behind his wife and children. These forced abandonments have caused divisions in families that have taken generations to heal.

The exhibition, organized by the BMA and the Mississippi Museum of Art, is causing a stir, in large part because it presents previously unseen works by three very big names: the painter Mark Bradford, the filmmaker Carrie Mae Weems and the artist installation Theater Gates.

After an exciting debut in April in Mississippi, the exhibit is expected to draw 30,000 visitors during the show’s three-month stay in Baltimore, said BMA chief curator Asma Naeem. After the exhibition closes in Charm City early next year, it is planned to visit three other museums in the country.

Curators Jessica Bell Brown of the BMA and Ryan N. Dennis of the Mississippi Museum of Art mix these famous figures with nine lesser-known artists, many of whom have family ties to Maryland or Mississippi. This juxtaposition testifies to the confidence they place in these promising creators.

In particular, sharing gallery space with internationally acclaimed Bradford, who represented the United States at the 2017 Venice Biennale (often described as “the Olympics of the art world”), s apparent to be invited to jam with Paul McCartney at Radio City Music Hall. It doesn’t get much more heady than that.

“It’s humiliating,” said multimedia artist Jamea Richmond-Edwards, 40, of Washington, D.C. “It’s a bit surreal. But after working so hard, maybe it means we’ve finally arrived.

Kelly Nagle, left, and Tracey Johnson of VisitBaltimore review

Several of the commissioned artists have been personally affected by migration and have created works that feel deeply respondent.

Spectators looking inside the four black, glass and steel trapezoids that make up Brooklyn, New York-based artist Torkwase Dyson’s monumental “Way Over There Inside Me (A Festival of Inches)” find thin vertical columns of reflected light that seem to have been scattered to the four poles of the Earth, like displaced ghosts.

And in other galleries, the New York artist Leslie Hewitt creates a poignant symphony of empty spaces in her three installations entitled “Untitled (Imperceptible, Slow Drag, Barely Moving)”. Steel beams form the outlines of the rooms, and inside the mostly bare enclosure were placed heirlooms: fluted glass plates and tiny, delicate cups. The glassware is stacked on the ground, therefore transparent and fragile, barely protected. They could be shattered into pieces by one inattentive movement of a clumsy boot.

The exhibition also includes a recording booth where visitors can share personal stories of their own exoduses, voluntary or not.

For Cook Jr.’s commission, “Let My Testimony Sit Next to Yours,” he worked with a genealogist to trace his father’s family to South Carolina in the mid-19th century. The exhibit includes a tattered black-and-white wedding photograph, dated circa 1900, of the artist’s great-great-grandparents, James H. Cook Jr. and Minnie Pearson Cook.

A long vertical tear in the paper cuts the husband in half. Considering what happened next, this tear seems almost prophetic.

“My great-great-grandfather met a white man and had to flee South Carolina to Augusta, Georgia,” Cook Jr.

“He finally found work and a place to live and wrote to his wife, who was raising the family alone in South Carolina. He said he wanted Minnie and their children to move to Augusta. But the person who got that letter back wasn’t his wife. She was his daughter, and at the time, she was dating a young man. For fear of having to leave it behind, she hid this letter from her mother.

“The family never lived together again.”

Larry W. Cook Jr. stands next to a portrait he took of his father, displayed with letters they wrote, during a preview of "A movement in all directions: the legacies of the great migration" at the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Once the cycle of separation and loss began, the artist noted, it continued through the generations and eventually entangled his father.

“My dad had a tough upbringing,” Cook Jr. said.

The artist learned that his grandmother died when his father was a toddler and his grandfather struggled with alcoholism. Perhaps thinking that his son would be better off in a stable home, the grandfather sent his child to live with his sister.

By the time Cook Sr. celebrated his fifth birthday, his father was dead.

Cook Sr. declined to be interviewed for this story. But it is present in the form of a letter he wrote to his own father, William Cook Jr., which he calls “Pops” and which is included in the exhibit.

“It’s been over 30 years since you passed away,” Cook Sr wrote. “I never thought about how your absence when I was young affected me as a father. It was easier for me not to think about it. I carried that pain with me and passed it on to my sons. I was not the father that I could be. But they forgave me and I have a second chance to make it right.

After long and sincere conversations between father and son, the artist felt something change in him. It wasn’t that the anger was gone, exactly. But over time, the anger became less important. This gave way to other feelings.

“Our relationship is a work in progress,” Cook Jr. said. “One thing you learn about forgiveness is that it can’t come with strings attached.”

To complete the order, Cook Jr. had to take one last photo. He invited his father to his studio at Howard University and pulled out his camera.

“When I look through a lens, I can see people in a different way,” Cook Jr.

In Cook Jr.’s final photograph for “The Great Migration,” Larry Cook Sr. sits on a metal stool, wearing khaki pants and an ochre-colored shirt. Her back is straight and her hands are crossed in her lap. Although the older man is bald and the younger one has long, cascading braids down his back, the first thing most observers notice is how alike father and son look.

In the photograph, Cook Sr. looks directly at the viewer. His eyes are fixed and seem to retain nothing. He seems like a man viewers can trust.

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“When I looked through the lens, I could see my father’s pain and trauma,” said Larry Cook Jr., “but I could also see his sense of pride, his energy, his confidence and his love.

“In many ways, I was looking at myself.”

What: “A movement in all directions: legacies of the great migration”

Where: Baltimore Art Museum, 10 Art Museum Drive

Hours: Until January 29, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays and from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Thursdays

Ticket price: $5-$15

Information: Call 443-573-1700 or go to artbma.org

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