Museum stand – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 11:14:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://laprairie-shlm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-2-150x150.png Museum stand – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ 32 32 The Rubin Museum of Art to return two relics from its collection to Nepal https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-rubin-museum-of-art-to-return-two-relics-from-its-collection-to-nepal/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 10:55:19 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-rubin-museum-of-art-to-return-two-relics-from-its-collection-to-nepal/ the Rubin Art Museum in New York announced that he would return two relics from his collection to Nepal after they were found smuggled from two religious sites in the Kathmandu Valley. A memorandum of understanding was signed on Monday by Bishnu Prasad Gautam, acting Nepalese consul general in New York, and Jorrit Britschgi, executive […]]]>

the Rubin Art Museum in New York announced that he would return two relics from his collection to Nepal after they were found smuggled from two religious sites in the Kathmandu Valley.

A memorandum of understanding was signed on Monday by Bishnu Prasad Gautam, acting Nepalese consul general in New York, and Jorrit Britschgi, executive director of the Rubin Museum.

“The Rubin Museum agreed to return the sculptures after identifying them and providing the required proof of their origins,” Gautam told Kantipur, the Post’s sister newspaper.

“Lost Arts of Nepal”, a group working to identify and locate lost Nepal artefacts scattered around the world, in September said he had located the two relics – a Flying Gandharva from the 14th century and another the upper part of a Torana from the 17th centuryat the Rubin Art Museum.

Nepalese heritage recovery campaign had then written to the museum for the return of the objects. The Department of Archeology then provided information to determine the ownership and origin of the works of art.

The museum said in a statement that these two relics were the first items in its collection to have been obtained illegally, the The New York Times reported.

According to museum officials, the Torana was lost from the main gate of Yampi Mahavihara / I-Bahi, Patan, Lalitpur. According to museum officials, the artwork arrived at the museum in 2010. The flying Apsara artwork is from Keshchandra Mahavihara, Itum Bahal, Kathmandu, which was lost in 1999 and added to the museum’s collection. in 2003.

According to a statement released by the Nepalese Consulate General in New York, Britschgi, upon signing the MoU, said: “As custodians of the art of our collection, the Rubin recognizes that we have an ongoing duty to carefully research the art and objects we collect and let’s exhibit. “

“The theft of archaeological objects continues to be a major concern in the art world. Rubin’s collection activities adhere to the highest standards of ethical and professional practice related to provenance, ”said Britschgi. “We believe it is our responsibility to address and resolve cultural property issues, including helping to facilitate the return of the two objects in question.”

Gautam, for his part, expressed his gratitude to the Rubin Museum.

“Rubin’s proactive and warm response and thoughtful collaboration have positively contributed to Nepal’s national efforts to recover and restore lost artifacts,” Gautam said. “I expressed my deep gratitude to the Rubin Museum, its Executive Director, Board of Trustees, academics and museum officials for their initiative and cooperation in returning these artefacts to Nepal.”

Gautam also appreciated the support received from the media, civil society and others in the business, the statement said.

The Nepalese Consulate General in New York and the Rubin Museum have expressed their willingness to work closely together to promote art and culture, including Himalayan art, saying these collaborative efforts contribute to the preservation cultural heritage and further strengthen the long-standing people. -the relations between Nepal and the United States of America.

“The Consulate General continues to work on the country’s national efforts in repatriating lost cultural property,” the statement read.

In December, government officials returned a sculpture depicting the Hindu goddess Lakshmi-Narayan on the pedestal of her temple in Patan after the Dallas Museum of Art returned it.

Gautam called the signing of the agreement a new step in the recovery of lost artifacts.

“The Rubin Museum of Art has agreed to cover the cost of transporting the relics to Nepal,” Gautam said. “These two relics have already been removed from the exhibits. “

According to Gautam, the two relics are expected to arrive in Nepal during the third week of May.

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Yass Railway Museum is the small local engine that could https://laprairie-shlm.com/yass-railway-museum-is-the-small-local-engine-that-could/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 20:05:20 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/yass-railway-museum-is-the-small-local-engine-that-could/ The last train to Yass Town 1988, crossing the Yass River Bridge. Photo: Yass Railway Museum. The Yass Railway Museum and its team of volunteers are dedicated to telling the story of the small, rugged steam locomotives that were able, and did, for many years, connect Yass Township to the Main South Line. The bustling […]]]>

The last train to Yass Town 1988, crossing the Yass River Bridge. Photo: Yass Railway Museum.

The Yass Railway Museum and its team of volunteers are dedicated to telling the story of the small, rugged steam locomotives that were able, and did, for many years, connect Yass Township to the Main South Line.

The bustling town of Yass was frustrated to discover in the 1870s that the railway line to be built between Sydney and Melbourne would bypass the city for five kilometers. Railways were the lifeblood of the community for passengers and the movement of goods to and from market when the roads were so often impassable and slow.

The answer was Yass Town station and a connecting streetcar that opened on Wednesday April 20, 1892.

The busy Yass Town station was manned around the clock to ensure all South Line trains were serviced by the 1301-class steam engine carrying its passenger and freight cars.

District products such as wool, wheat and fruit from the orchards could now reach the market quickly and in good condition.

In return, much-needed supplies, equipment and goods arrived reliably to supply bustling Cooma Street businesses and district farms.

Travelers could avoid the tedious horse-drawn carriage ride to Yass Junction on the main line by simply getting on the streetcar car right in the city center.

man at the railway museum

Bob Frank in the museum ladies waiting room. Photo: Judith Davidson.

The Yass Railway Museum offers a comprehensive experience of when rail was king.

Volunteer Bob Frank is happy to share his encyclopedic knowledge of Yass Town station buildings, hangars, freight cars and sidings, shunting engine, guard vans, unusual platform at ground level with classic cast iron moldings around the porch posts and wooden railings so the ladies didn’t have to show their ankles to get on the train.


READ ALSO: Yass River is historic road less traveled


There is a beautifully restored 1307 crane and steam engine that all look perfectly at home. The so-called “tap dance” line maintenance trikes are now inactive.

In front of the platform there are four pairs of tracks with dots. It takes little imagination to see how the steam engine and cars maneuvered on these lines to allow trains to enter and exit the station on their busy schedules.

Unfortunately, the line was closed to passengers in 1959 and to freight in 1988. Residents of Dutton Street no longer had to put up with the noise and vibrations of trains steadily ascending and descending in the very center of their street, but lines are still there.

The same goes for the beautiful iron railway bridge at the end of Dutton Street spanning the Yass River.

The wooden approaches are not safe and the whole is closed to the public but the spectacle is impressive.

The line is still visible as you exit town and head towards Yass Junction – heavily overgrown but still there. At Yass Junction, the siding where this little play train stopped for passengers is still apparent.

wagon interior

A passenger car awaiting restoration at the Yass Railway Museum. Photo: Judith Davidson.

The volunteers of the museum, open every Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., love to tell about the good years of the station.

There are tales of milk cans and groceries being delivered to the freight shed and you can see the truck height platform where local businesses collected their freight until 1988.

The fifth line, which has now been retired, was once the siding where the dental rail van was parked for a week to provide dental service in town before the 1950s or a traveling exhibit in a specially decorated car was parked.

Huge transformers arrived by train to be trucked to the Electricity Commission plant just outside of town.

A line ran past the station and across to Crago’s Mill, still standing next to Aldi – grain came in and flour came out.

Later during the Depression of the 1930s, an ice and rabbit freezer factory established in the old mill loaded rabbit carcasses into ice-cooled vans bound for the Sydney market.

Parked next to the wool bale loading lane is the special van dedicated to transporting Arnott’s biscuits around NSW and the gasoline tanker that distributed fuel to local service stations.

For young and old alike, a set of model trains lovingly constructed by local John Harmer and donated to the museum are housed in the Old Fuel Room where the platform and signal lights were once filled.

Volunteer Ron Barton laughed, saying, “I’ve seen kids not wanting to get off the train being dragged along by embarrassed parents.”

Judith Davidson is a local historian, uncovering the stories of the Yass Shire.

Original article published by Judith Davidson on Anti riot law.

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NEMPN Rewards IAIA With Best Museum Studies Program https://laprairie-shlm.com/nempn-rewards-iaia-with-best-museum-studies-program/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 23:37:30 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/nempn-rewards-iaia-with-best-museum-studies-program/ Santa Fe, New Mexico, January 7, 2022 – The National Emerging Museum Professionals Network (NEMPN), a leading nonprofit organization, has launched its first-ever awards program to “recognize individuals and institutions who have made a exceptional service to emerging museum professionals. “For the Inaugural EMP Awards, the Department of Museum Studies at the Institute of American […]]]>

Santa Fe, New Mexico, January 7, 2022 – The National Emerging Museum Professionals Network (NEMPN), a leading nonprofit organization, has launched its first-ever awards program to “recognize individuals and institutions who have made a exceptional service to emerging museum professionals. “For the Inaugural EMP Awards, the Department of Museum Studies at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) received the award for Best Museum Studies Program. For this category, three diploma / certificate programs Museum studies in the country were recognized for the diversity and inclusiveness of their programs as well as for the quality education and training they provide to new museum professionals. The other two were the graduate program of Cooperstown and the University of Washington Master of Arts in Museology program.

Balzer Contemporary Edge Gallery Director Mattie Reynolds (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma) says national recognition of the award exponentially expands professional networks in museums. “We will not only have more people and organizations exposed to IAIA, but it will also expose our students to NEMPN,” Reynolds said. “We are one of the oldest museum study programs in a school in the country. So it’s a very well established program. as a competitive program for Indigenous and non-Indigenous museum professionals. Currently, New Mexico is starting its own chapter affiliated with NEMPN through the New Mexico Museum Association (NMAM), according to Reynolds. It will be an extraordinary resource for current students and recent graduates of museum studies programs in New Mexico, and it illustrates the exponential growth of the network Reynolds is talking about.

What sets the IAIA Museum Studies program apart as one of the best programs in the country is its Indigenous approach to learning along with its hands-on and hands-on methods that easily prepare new museum professionals for work. in the field as soon as you exit the program. “Our program focuses on Indigenous ways of knowing and practicing, as well as ethical and moral approaches to museum work,” says Reynolds. “It makes us really unique. We teach our students the traditional western way of doing things in the museum, then we tell them to unlearn it all and we teach them a more indigenous approach to museum work. This comprehensive and inclusive methodology gives an advantage to emerging museum professionals, whether they are new to the museum field or looking to broaden their knowledge in the field.

While students in the IAIA Museum Studies program receive their share of theory, the practical applications of the program exceed those of other programs. “We’re very logically structured to support museum professionals from the start,” says Reynolds. “Working in the gallery, for example, is one of the compulsory courses. Students gain extensive experience in setting up and uninstallation of exhibits. We also offer courses in the maintenance and conservation of collections. This practical and applicable approach to learning museology is quite unique. “

This rewards program is part of the rebranding of NEMPN they underwent earlier this year. As part of their rebranding, they officially changed their title to an acronym, and as that act reminded them of IHOP, the Inaugural EMP Awards trophy will be an engraved maple syrup bottle. “I’m thinking of having a pancake feast so we can use our maple syrup prize,” Reynolds says. The announcement of the Inaugural EMP Awards can be viewed on the NEMPN website.

For questions or more information, please contact IAIA Director of Communications Jason S. Ordaz at jason.ordaz@iaia.edu.

Photography: museology students from the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Indigenous Arts (MoCNA) collection; Department of Museum Studies Director Mattie Reynolds (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma). Photographs by Jason S. Ordaz.

About the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)

The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) is the only college in the world dedicated to the study of contemporary Native American and Alaska Native arts. The IAIA offers undergraduate degrees in Film Arts and Technology, Creative Writing, Indigenous Liberal Studies, Museum Studies, Performing Arts, and Performing Arts; graduate degrees in creative writing and visual arts; and certificates in Broadcast Journalism, Business and Entrepreneurship, Museum Studies, and Native American Art History. The college is home to approximately 500 full-time equivalent (FTE) and non-Native American students from around the world, representing nearly 100 federally recognized tribes. Named one of the top art institutions by UNESCO and the International Arts Association, IAIA is one of the leading art institutes in our country and accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC).

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Here’s how you can help the Sanilac County Museum preserve a piece of history https://laprairie-shlm.com/heres-how-you-can-help-the-sanilac-county-museum-preserve-a-piece-of-history/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 03:05:34 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/heres-how-you-can-help-the-sanilac-county-museum-preserve-a-piece-of-history/ PORT SANILAC – The Sanilac County Historical Society needs the public’s assistance in moving the Bark Shanty / Aitkin House from its current location to the Sanilac County Historic Village and Museum. Owner Julie Fagan said she and her husband would like to preserve the history of the house rather than tearing it down. Built […]]]>

PORT SANILAC – The Sanilac County Historical Society needs the public’s assistance in moving the Bark Shanty / Aitkin House from its current location to the Sanilac County Historic Village and Museum.

Owner Julie Fagan said she and her husband would like to preserve the history of the house rather than tearing it down. Built in 1853 at what is now 71 South Lake Street, next to Bark Shanty Marina, this is one of the first homes ever built in Port Sanilac and one of the oldest still standing.

“Tearing it down would be the easy way out,” Fagan said. “We love the house. We love the history of the house… It has a ton of history and we want to do everything we can to preserve it.”

“It’s worth it,” added Dawn Malek, administrator of the Sanilac County Historical Society.

The Sanilac County Historical Society is currently running a fundraising campaign to help raise the funds needed to move the house to the museum grounds. The company’s board of directors has pledged $ 25,000 of the $ 100,000 needed to move the house.

The living room is lit by natural light coming through the windows of Bark Shanty / Aitkin on Thursday January 6, 2022 at Bark Shanty Marina in Port Sanilac.  The historic home owned by Julie Fagan and her husband could potentially be moved to the Sanilac County Historic Village and Museum.  The Sanilac County Historical Society is currently running a fundraising campaign to help raise the funds needed to move the house.

The company is going to the public for the remaining $ 75,000. The company is currently asking for pledges, or pledges to donate a certain amount of money, to help gauge public interest in the project, as the historical society is currently committed financially to two other projects.

If the company can increase the cost of the project in pledges by February 1, the project will go ahead. Otherwise, the project will not go ahead, the company said. Fagan said they had not yet decided what to do with the house if there weren’t enough pledges.

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New Jack Kerouac Foundation to Open Museum in Former Lowell Church – Lowell Sun https://laprairie-shlm.com/new-jack-kerouac-foundation-to-open-museum-in-former-lowell-church-lowell-sun/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 22:42:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/new-jack-kerouac-foundation-to-open-museum-in-former-lowell-church-lowell-sun/ LOWELL – Literary icon Jack Kerouac, born and raised in Lowell, may soon have a museum established in his honor in the church he visited as a child. The newly created Kerouac Foundation seeks to establish the Jack Kerouac museum and performance center in the former Saint-Jean-Baptiste church on rue Merrimack. The church was built […]]]>

LOWELL – Literary icon Jack Kerouac, born and raised in Lowell, may soon have a museum established in his honor in the church he visited as a child.

The newly created Kerouac Foundation seeks to establish the Jack Kerouac museum and performance center in the former Saint-Jean-Baptiste church on rue Merrimack. The church was built in 1896 and served the neighborhood’s French-Canadian population, and was also the site of Kerouac’s funeral mass in 1969.

“Who doesn’t know the writer Jack Kerouac? said Jim Sampas, CEO of the foundation. “Although there have been monuments built in Kerouac, there is no museum or performance center to celebrate the artistic talent of this singular author. There is a strong case to be made that no author in history has been more influential in the musical arts than Jack Kerouac and the performance center will celebrate this legacy. “

Sampas, who is also the literary executor of the Kerouac estate, said the idea of ​​the museum and the performance space has been around for some time. Sylvia Cunha, the domain’s marketing director and now the foundation’s CEO, came up with the idea, he said.

When approached by Dave Ouellette of the Acre Coalition to Improve Our Neighborhood, known as Action, with the idea of ​​pursuing the church building as the home for the museum, they immediately knew it was the right choice.

They contacted TMI Property Management and Development, owner of the vacant building, and hope to purchase it soon to make this dream come true.

“Memorize Jack in the place where his brother Gerard was baptized, where he himself served for a time as an altar boy and where he formed a deep bond with the priest who conducted his funeral, Father Spike Morissette, would be incredibly appropriate, ”said Ouellette. .

Sampas said the church will contain a wide variety of artifacts related to Kerouac’s life.

“The idea is to create a space that is very welcoming for everyone, as they would like, I’m sure,” Sampas said. “What we’re trying to do is have a museum that’s going to have Jack’s artifacts, lots of visual artifacts, and something very visually stimulating. It will be original editions, letters and manuscripts, of course, but there will also be things created by artists that help engage audiences.

He noted that Kerouac’s writings influenced a wide variety of writers, visual artists and musicians, which inspired the project to include a performance center in the museum complex.

“I have had the great pleasure and the wonderful experience of working on several entertainment projects where we have had famous rock’n’roll artists, like Eddie Vedder, Michael Stipe, Patti Smith, Tom Waits and others, who love his job and were very excited to be part of anything to do with him, “said Sampas.” The performance center will be celebrating that legacy in a way. “

A centenary celebration of the 100th anniversary of Kerouac is planned this year. As part of the celebration, the original scroll from the writer’s best-known novel, “On the Road”, will be featured in an exhibit titled “Visions of Kerouac” at the Lowell National Historical Park Boott Cotton Mills Galley, among other events .

Sampas said he expects the creation of the museum and performance space to take at least a year and a half, but it’s still too early to tell. However, he said the foundation had already heard from many people interested in helping the project.

“We hope the excitement surrounding this will not only bring money to this project, but also to Lowell’s economy,” Sampas said. “As it is, people come from all over the world. … A lot of people have made a pilgrimage to the grave, so that’s going to speed it up. “

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Arcadia to Abstraction at the Budapest Fine Arts Museum https://laprairie-shlm.com/arcadia-to-abstraction-at-the-budapest-fine-arts-museum/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 00:38:15 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/arcadia-to-abstraction-at-the-budapest-fine-arts-museum/ The STORIES of modern painting conventionally begin with Paul Cézanne (1839-1906); and yet its relationship with later avant-garde artists is fraught with contradiction. The Budapest exhibition “Cezanne to Malevich” (the gallery and the artist’s descendants prefer the spelling of the artist’s name without the conventional accent, reflecting its own use of the dialect) reminds us […]]]>

The STORIES of modern painting conventionally begin with Paul Cézanne (1839-1906); and yet its relationship with later avant-garde artists is fraught with contradiction. The Budapest exhibition “Cezanne to Malevich” (the gallery and the artist’s descendants prefer the spelling of the artist’s name without the conventional accent, reflecting its own use of the dialect) reminds us that it is less he who influenced them that they or they who reinterpreted it.

The story of an appropriation (diversion) is usually told in terms of jarring visual philosophies. Where Cézanne freely dialogued with classical tradition in paintings of classical Arcadia, such as The great swimmers (1898), later modernists simply ignored it. Where Cézanne used geometric accentuation to anchor the perception of real objects, Cubists used real objects to celebrate geometry, and Mondrian got rid of external referents entirely in favor of mathematical abstraction.

The exhibition captures Cézanne’s familiar revisionist tale well, while expanding it geographically to cover the less familiar subject of the artist’s reception in Central and Eastern Europe. The exhibition ends with an exploration of the work of the Russian “supremacist” painter Kazimir Malevich (1879-1935).

© photo MASP João MusaPaul Cézanne (1839-1906), Madame Cézanne en rouge, 1888-90, Collection Museu de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand, São Paulo, Brazil

Cezanne’s enthusiastic reception at the start of the avant-garde in Moscow was characterized by Malevich, who wrote that “In Cézanne’s personality our history of painting reaches the peak of its development. In Self-portrait and Portrait of Piotr Konchalovsky, (1910), Ilya Mashkov (1881-1944) placed a work entitled Cezanne next to the Bible on the shelf behind him.

Nonetheless, for others, the response to this new stimulus from France was, paradoxically, a diversion from Western pictorial tradition – and even from Cézanne himself. “Long live the splendid Orient! . . . Long live nationality! We are against the West. . . Today it is Cézanne and Picasso against whom we must fight! thundered Mikhail Larionov (1881-1944) in a 1913 manifesto.

Larionov and his supporters set out to dig deep into the traditions of Russian decorative art and Orthodox iconography, provocatively drawing the vernacular into the gallery and the sacred into the secular sphere. These currents combine in that of Larionov Venus from 1912, where, shockingly, the erotic mythological subject appears against a background of a golden yellow icon, while the decor is suggested using sparse motifs from Russian folk tradition.

There is a certain irony here. Larionov sought to escape Cezanne by unwittingly following his own path of renunciation. The exhibition reminds us that Cézanne was also inspired by the domestic ecclesial tradition. His in-depth study of figurative patterns in medieval parish churches in Aix-en-Provence shaped his own reshaping of facial representations, as evidenced by the portraits of his son Paul (1885) and his wife Hortense (vs. 1890).

Malevich, on the other hand, remained closer to Cézanne in his proclaimed sympathy, but, ironically, moved away from him in the loosening of conventions of representation. His work testifies to a complex negotiation with both Cézanne’s legacy and Christian belief.

In White square and dissolution plan (1918), the subject appears to be a tomb, and the upper dissolving rectangle extending beyond the edge of the sheet could (as the catalog suggests) “be taken for a mystical substance, as if it were was about a soul leaving a body ”.

Collection Stedelijk Museum AmsterdamKazimir Malevich (1879-1935), Mystic Suprematism (Red Cross on black circle), 1920-22, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam

Mystical suprematism (red cross on black circle) (1920-22) suggests the death of faith itself more than that of a believer. Leaning crosses are a familiar sight in Orthodox cemeteries, but the violent red is reminiscent of the Soviet revolution of 1917, the force of which detached the minor crossbars, which are scattered all around. The black halo suggests the eclipse of metaphysical belief itself.

What the exhibition could have explored in more depth is the contrast between Cézanne’s vision of art as a gateway to the spiritual (in the literal sense of the term iconic) and the tendency of his performers and disciples to consider the artistic process and its fruits as spiritual in and of themselves.

In his pioneering 1913 study Cézanne and Holder (cited in catalog), Fritz Burger wrote of Cezanne in terms that speak of a spirituality beyond theism, arguing that he “shows us everywhere the grave and solemn face of the cosmos behind the insignificant details”, and even speaking of “a darkening veil of mystery extending over the luminous freshness of vitality.” The Dutch abstractionist Van Doesburg went further in 1915, asserting: “The new style… represents the absolute, the absolute. Eternal, God As such, the new practice of art is a priesthood in the universal sense of the term.

These interpretations, however, ignore Cézanne’s own biography. He first learned to draw under the guidance of his high school teacher, the Spanish monk Joseph Gilbert. Although Cézanne’s adult Catholic practice was intermittent, he returned to it from 1891 with sustained ardor throughout his last 15 years.

The importance of these facts to understanding his art is evident from his own claim. “When I judge art, I take my painting and place it next to an object created by God like a tree or a flower. If it collides, it’s not art.

Contemplating this context will help us better understand why Cézanne himself never completely crossed the line from Arcadia to abstraction.

“Cézanne to Malevich: from Arcadia to abstraction” is in the Museum of Fine Arts, 1146 Budapest, Dózsa György út 41, Budapest, until February 13. www.mfab.hu

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Day trips: Pop Art Museum, San Angelo: an open-air museum offers art in an unusual place – Columns https://laprairie-shlm.com/day-trips-pop-art-museum-san-angelo-an-open-air-museum-offers-art-in-an-unusual-place-columns/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 06:40:22 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/day-trips-pop-art-museum-san-angelo-an-open-air-museum-offers-art-in-an-unusual-place-columns/ Photos by Gerald E. McLeod The Pop Art Museum in Saint angel salutes “folk art” in a former roofless bowling alley. The art style mastered by people like Andy warhol and Pierre Max during the 1960s has a comedic appeal that satirizes popular culture while transcending socio-economic boundaries. You can question the artistic value of […]]]>

Photos by Gerald E. McLeod

The Pop Art Museum in Saint angel salutes “folk art” in a former roofless bowling alley.

The art style mastered by people like Andy warhol and Pierre Max during the 1960s has a comedic appeal that satirizes popular culture while transcending socio-economic boundaries. You can question the artistic value of pop art, but you have to admit, it’s fun and controversial.

Opened in 2019, the open-air museum is part of the Art in unusual places mission to keep San Angelo weird. The nonprofit arts organization has also sponsored a series of nearby murals known as “brush alley“and donated artwork to local parks.

The Pop Art Museum occupies the space where the Bowling center opened in 1946. Lightning (literally) closed it in 1952. The tracks were reopened but fell into disuse, and eventually the abandoned building became an eyesore.

The hollowed-out brick building with walls shared with the buildings on either side has no doors. Horizontal metal beams define the location of the roof.

Over 30 local artists have contributed to incredibly creative panels depicting the city’s vast reservoir of talent in West Texas. Among the open-air museum is an original piece of James francis gill, a native of the region who was a contemporary of Warhol.

All art panels include a QR code that visitors can use to find out more on their phone about the art and the artists.

The Pop Art Museum is located at 125 W. Twohig in downtown San Angelo. There is no entrance fee and the exhibition is open all the time. To learn more about the Art in Uncommon Places beautification program, visit artinuncommonplaces.com.


1,583rd in a series. Follow “Day Trips & Beyond,” a travel blog, at austinchronicle.com/daily/travel.

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Inside the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures and the Rolex Gallery https://laprairie-shlm.com/inside-the-academy-museum-of-motion-pictures-and-the-rolex-gallery/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 07:09:56 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/inside-the-academy-museum-of-motion-pictures-and-the-rolex-gallery/ As the highly anticipated Academy Museum of Motion Pictures opens in Los Angeles, we take a look at the place in cinema history of one of its main supporters, Rolex, as well as the brand’s long-term commitment to the cinema art. The opening of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures on September 30 marked a […]]]>

As the highly anticipated Academy Museum of Motion Pictures opens in Los Angeles, we take a look at the place in cinema history of one of its main supporters, Rolex, as well as the brand’s long-term commitment to the cinema art.

The opening of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures on September 30 marked a major milestone in the history of cinema. According to Hollywood journalist, the last industry giants such as Walt Disney, Louis B Mayer, Mary Pickford and Gloria Swanson were keen for such a museum to be created. Now, finally, alongside other tributes to America’s contribution to the cinematic arts – including Universal Studios theme parks and a plethora of museums housing Hollywood costumes, props, posters, and memorabilia – comes a institution up to the task.

Dedicated to the history, science and cultural influence of cinema, the Academy Museum is the first and largest of its kind in the United States. The 300,000 square foot campus stands proudly on the corner of Fairfax Avenue and Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles, California. Its location is well placed to welcome visitors from around the world to explore exhibits, screenings, programs and collections that shed light on the past, present and future of cinema.

Rolex James Cameron Testimonial

Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the museum was built over six years, on a budget greater than any blockbuster ever made. There are two buildings on site. The main one was a heritage monument that underwent a major restoration and expansion to become the Saban Building, which houses six floors of state-of-the-art exhibition and event spaces, an Art House-style theater, an education studio, a conservation studio and public spaces. Connected to it by a glass bridge is the new Sphere Building, which houses a 999-seat auditorium and particularly spectacular with its domed top, on which a terrace offers panoramic views stretching from Westwood to Hollywood sign.

As the institution’s founding patron, Rolex has a permanent room on the third floor of the museum. Called the Rolex Gallery, it is an experiential space showcasing film stories in which installations tell about the impact of technology, artists, history and societal issues on filmmaking. The Cosmograph Daytona, famous property of the late actor and racing enthusiast Paul Newman, is also on display.

Rolex and the Academy of Cinema Arts and Sciences did not formalize their relationship until 2017, when the Swiss brand became the exclusive watch and a proud sponsor of the Oscars. However, the watchmaker’s long-standing ties to the cinema go back much further.

The Greenroom 2021, hosted and designed by Rolex

Attached to the wrists of some of the greatest actors, Rolex watches have appeared in countless films in the past. At that time, actors wore the watches not for sponsorship reasons, but out of admiration for the brand, as well as the power and notion of success that watches brought to their roles.

For example, Marlon Brando wore a Rolex GMT-Master Ref. 1675 without its bezel in Apocalypse now (1979). Although Newman is most closely associated with the Daytona, he put a stainless steel Datejust in The color of silver (1986). In the epic of James Cameron Titanic (1997), Bill Paxton wore his own yellow gold Submariner as he descended towards the famous wreck of a submersible.

Alec Baldwin had a Rolex Day-Date President on his wrist in Glengarry Glen Ross (1992), while Matthew McConaughey accessorizes the Rolex Datejust in the The wolf of Wall Street in 2013. As for Ryan Gosling, he wore the Rolex Bubbleback and a Submariner in 2011 Crazy, stupid, love. Clint Eastwood and Dustin Hoffman are also known to wear their own Rolex watches in different movies.

Rolex Martin Scorsese testimonial

Rolex maintains that it has never put a watch in a movie as product placement, and never will, although the brand clearly welcomes a director’s choice to use the brand to use the brand for. represent the courage of a particular character.

Today, Rolex continues to actively support filmmakers, whether they are established authors or emerging talents. He still maintains close ties with two great figures in cinema, Scorsese and Cameron, and also heads the prestigious Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative, which pairs young artists with masters in their discipline for creative collaborations. Scorsese has previously sponsored this program, as have directors Alfonso Cuarón and Spike Lee, demonstrating the commitment of Rolex and the masters of cinema to the pursuit of excellence and the development of the next generation of filmmakers.

This story first appeared in the December 2021 issue of Prestige Singapore.

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LETTERS: The museum is not Disney World; solved the problem | Opinion https://laprairie-shlm.com/letters-the-museum-is-not-disney-world-solved-the-problem-opinion/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/letters-the-museum-is-not-disney-world-solved-the-problem-opinion/ The museum is not Disney World In response to Connor Finley’s December 28 letter regarding his visit to the United States Olympic and Paralympic Museum, I would like to respond. Mr. Finley, I don’t think I know you, but if I did, we might be friends. And as a friend, I should tell you how […]]]>

The museum is not Disney World

In response to Connor Finley’s December 28 letter regarding his visit to the United States Olympic and Paralympic Museum, I would like to respond.

Mr. Finley, I don’t think I know you, but if I did, we might be friends. And as a friend, I should tell you how narrow your take on your visit to this wonderful local attraction was.

What I learned from your letter is that you don’t like spending money on parking; the “games”, as you call them, did not live up to your expectations; and touch screens required you to read 2-3 sentences instead of watching a video. Oh, and the exterior signs asking that no skateboards be practiced on sidewalks (so as not to destroy property or run over customers) was contrary to what you thought was more appropriate.

Having visited the museum three times myself so far, and from what you have written I wonder if your experience could have been any different if first you had parked on the street where you are paying a meter per hour (much less than the $ 39 you ended up paying). Second, if you had read one of the 2-3 sentence descriptions next to one of the beautiful photographs depicting the hundreds of athlete experiences, you might have been inspired instead of so disappointed with “clumsy and banal” virtual tests. After all, it’s not Disney World.

A quote from one of the exhibits expresses the theme of the museum: “Everything about the Olympics is great, especially its values ​​and ideals. The Games bring the world together and reflect a vision of peace, equality, excellence and, above all, the joy of participating.

As the games progressed, their scope widened, both in terms of geography and idealism. And more than all athletics and spectacle, the Olympics produce a spectacularly human feeling. As figure skater Scott Hamilton said: “Most other competitions are individual achievements, but the Olympics are something that belongs to everyone.”

I could go on and mention all the things I learned from my visits. I look forward to a fourth visit so that I can read more of the 2-3 sentence accounts of those who have experienced the joy of participating in the Games.

Joan nusbaum

Colorado springs

Absolutely nailed the problem

Thank you for publishing Glenn Loury’s article in the Sunday Gazette as part of the Benson Center Lecture Series at the University of Colorado at Boulder. This black professor fully understood the black problem in America and its solution. His last paragraph says it better than anything I could do. Here it is again:

“So here is my last unspeakable truth, which I now speak in defiance of ‘culture cancellation’. If we black people want to walk with dignity, if we want to be truly equal, then we have to realize that whites cannot give us equality. We actually need to earn equal status. Please don’t cancel me just yet because I’m on the black side here. But I feel obliged to point out that equality of dignity, equality of status, equality of honor, equality of security in one’s position in society, equality of being able to impose respect for others – it is not something that can just be passed on. Rather, it is something to be wrenched from a cruel and indifferent world with hard, bare-handed work, inspired by the example of our enslaved and newly liberated ancestors. We must make each other equal. No one can do it for us.

Erik Lessing

Monument

The “left madness” continues

The left-wing madness continued in December with the guilty verdict of Jussie Smollett, who created and practiced the hate crime hoax that two guys wearing MAGA hats attacked him and tied him in a noose around the neck.

Let’s not forget Joe Biden and Kamala Harris’ rush to judgment bolstering Smollett’s hate crime hoax while almost simultaneously calling Kyle Rittenhouse a “white supremacist” for his innocent acts of self-defense.

Then Chicago State Attorney Kim Foxx tried to cover up Smollett’s crime and not charge him by telling Smollett’s sister, “Your brother should be fine as long as he stays consistent.” just before a retired judge successfully files the petition as a private citizen to have a special prosecutor assigned to the case. It is shameful how these Democrats try so hard to create lies, divide America on race, and then attempt to cover up their own crimes.

Speaking of tampering with evidence, the Jan.6 committee now admits Congressman Adam Schiff forged text messages and even displayed them onscreen during his statement to create the illusion that councilors and lawmakers of Donald Trump colluded with those in the so-called insurgency on Capitol Hill. . No media outlet wants to mention Antifa organizer John Sullivan, who colluded with CNN in the planned riot on Capitol Hill or the 534 nationwide Antifa riots in 2020. Schiff should be thrown in jail with the rioters of Antifa.

Two Democrats who pushed for “Defund the Police” – one is robbed at gunpoint in Pennsylvania while the other is hijacked in Illinois. And what did they do afterwards? Yes, they called the police they want to reimburse. If you are a Democrat who wants to fund the police, please do not call the police. They are necessary for Americans who appreciate our police officers.

Oh, and by the way, the Chicago Dem’s husband had a gun and used it during the hijacking. Amazing how the same Democrats, who want to ban guns and fund citizen policing, use them for themselves.

A Democratic rights group wants more female models for “greater equality” in model testing, claiming the models are male-dominated.

If you didn’t know any of these stories, there’s a good chance you’re watching “fake news” and that’s just part of the left-wing madness for December 2021.

Franck Aquila

Colorado springs

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Banners of Asian American artists on display at the Noguchi Museum https://laprairie-shlm.com/banners-of-asian-american-artists-on-display-at-the-noguchi-museum/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 17:00:32 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/banners-of-asian-american-artists-on-display-at-the-noguchi-museum/ In response to the rise of anti-Asian hate crimes, the Noguchi museum in Long Island City launched its first open call for artist banners and honored the finalists at an opening reception, where the banner made its debut. The event held in November brought together artists and their guests, museum partner organizations, elected officials and […]]]>

In response to the rise of anti-Asian hate crimes, the Noguchi museum in Long Island City launched its first open call for artist banners and honored the finalists at an opening reception, where the banner made its debut.

The event held in November brought together artists and their guests, museum partner organizations, elected officials and staff, including Museum Director Brett Littman, who opened the reception.

In an effort to raise awareness and amplify local AAPI voices, emerging AAPI artists based in Queens were invited to submit designs for the museum’s outdoor banner space to advocate for the fight against racism, where one artist would earn an honorarium of $ 1,000 and two finalists would each receive $ 500.

The initiative was created to show solidarity with the Japanese heritage of museum founder Isamu Noguchi and to act against the Asian hatred that has circulated information since the start of the pandemic.

“Amid the escalation of violence against the AAPI community and across the United States, staff felt absolutely compelled to prove that we are allies of these marginalized communities,” Littman said in his speech to ‘opening.

According to the media coordinator of the Noguchi museum, Justin Baez, the artist applications were assessed by a jury made up of the museum’s organizing committee, an interdepartmental and intergenerational group of volunteers, including himself, and representatives. two local partner organizations, Queen’s Arts Council and Asian-American Arts Alliance.

After receiving and narrowing down more than 20 entries, the museum selected Chemin Hsiao as the first winner and Woomin Kim and Mo Kong as the finalists.

(From left to right) Mo Kong, Woomin Kim and Chemin Hsiao won the Noguchi Museum’s call for nominations. (Photo credit: Katherine Abbott)
(Left to right) Brett Littman, Mo Kong, Woomin Kim and Chemin Hsiao. (Photo credit: Katherine Abbott)

Featured through six outdoor banners, Hsiao’s work, titled “Dandelions Know” (2021), was chosen for its powerful message of anti-racism, solidarity and hope in response to the growing wave of violence and fear facing Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders across the United States.

“What attracted us to Hsiao’s work is his ability to capture a lot of personal emotions towards the subject, doing it in a way that is aesthetically translatable by the banners,” Baez said. “We also appreciated the way he approached not only anti-racism, but the current political landscape in a narrative way.”

Hsiao, an Elmhurst-based Taiwanese visual artist, was initially reluctant to submit a banner proposal, struggling to figure out how to approach the heavy topic.

What ultimately drove him to participate was how much he admired Noguchi’s experience as Nisei, a second-generation Japanese American, especially during WWII.

In his essay, “I Become a Nisei”, Noguchi wrote that the Nisei are “an intermediate people with no common ground.” This particular quote, Hsiao said, is the essence of the central dandelion.

“Overall, the banner should be about Asian hate crimes and violence, but this specific piece is about Mr. Noguchi himself and how he feels and how I relate to the fact that he’s from Taiwan.” , Hsiao said. “I just took that perspective and thought, as a Taiwanese and a member of the AAPI community living in New York City, how do I feel? “

When you arrive at the entrance to the museum, the banners are presented in sequential order: 1) “Surrounded”, 2) “Fear”, 3) “Cut the loop”, 4) “Dandelions know (as they float too ) ”, 5)“ Heal and forgive (if possible) ”, 6)“ We are only humans. Keep communicating.

“Each of them serves a different purpose, but if I had to choose [my favorite], it’s the happy accident at the center of the series, the dandelion, ”Hsiao said. “When I planned the six drafts, this one was the hardest to come out because it’s not really related to Asian hate crimes, but ultimately it’s the one that people identify with the most. “

“Dandelions Know” banner (Photo credit: Katherine Abbott)

Hsiao’s hope is that the public aspect of the artwork will pique the interest of all passers-by and make them stop, look, and be curious.

Inside the museum, there is a description of the banner, as well as descriptions and visuals of the proposed banners by the two finalists.

Kong, a Chinese multidisciplinary artist and researcher residing in Sunnyside, created his works in the midst of the pandemic, preserving objects, such as food and trinkets from childhood, in the tradition of classical art to the inside their refrigerator.

Whether the pictures act as some sort of puzzle or a familiar ensemble, Kong hopes people can always relate to the pictures.

“What I’m trying to do is use [this project] like a mirror to reflect and verify our personal history, where we came from and why certain things are important to us, ”Kong said. “I also want to show, especially to immigrant children and children, the possibilities of creating works of art. You don’t have to have high access to start making art, but it can be anything around you.

The next finalist, Kim, a South Korean artist based in Ridgewood, wanted to change the inaccurate and xenophobic narrative surrounding shijang, or street markets.

“I just wanted to create the shijang narrative in a way that I know is more accurate to me, which is very colorful and festive and full of energy and vibrancy,” Kim said. “This is an organic conservation of material that might not make sense in Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s.”

The museum was drawn to how Kim’s aesthetic combined with the theme, especially with his use of textiles and materiality. “The way she created the banners kind of speaks to and elevates the day to day nature of Asian American life,” Baez said.

Mo Kong showing their banner design to guests at the reception. (Photo credit: Katherine Abbott)

Through her panels, Kim hopes she can provide visitors from Asian communities with moments of familiarity and recall their own memories in a festive way, as well as being a voice for Asians’ daily experiences for those unfamiliar with them.

“We are really proud of our finalists and the artists who submitted,” Baez said. “We hope that this will serve as a precedent and that we can continue this series in the following years, adopting different tones and requirements, while maintaining this fundamental vision and this desire to amplify the voice of local artists.”

The banners are displayed outside the entrance to the museum.

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