Museum stand – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ Tue, 05 Jul 2022 16:01:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://laprairie-shlm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-2-150x150.png Museum stand – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ 32 32 The blacksmith’s sons continue to pull the anvil at the Stuhr Museum | Grand Island Local News https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-blacksmiths-sons-continue-to-pull-the-anvil-at-the-stuhr-museum-grand-island-local-news/ Tue, 05 Jul 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-blacksmiths-sons-continue-to-pull-the-anvil-at-the-stuhr-museum-grand-island-local-news/ A year ago, Randy Dack was indulging in one of his favorite pastimes: anvil shooting at the Stuhr Museum. Dack died on February 26 at the age of 61. So on Monday, his three sons continued their father’s explosive Fourth of July tradition at the museum. The event drew several hundred people to parking lot […]]]>

A year ago, Randy Dack was indulging in one of his favorite pastimes: anvil shooting at the Stuhr Museum.

Dack died on February 26 at the age of 61. So on Monday, his three sons continued their father’s explosive Fourth of July tradition at the museum.

The event drew several hundred people to parking lot G of the Stuhr Museum, which is not far from the Immanuel Lutheran Church.

Jerod Dack of Shelton, Adam Dack of Juniata and Brandon Dack of Grand Island performed the anvil shot. Starting at noon, they fired the anvil three times.






Monday’s anvil firing at the Stuhr Museum drew a good crowd.


Jeff Bahr, Independent


Randy Dack worked as a blacksmith at the Stuhr Museum during the summer months and moved into maintenance during the winter.

“It was one of Randy’s highlights every year – pulling the anvil,” said Tom Oshlo, the museum’s facilities manager.

Gunpowder propels a large anvil weighing 85 to 90 pounds into the air.

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Prior to ignition, the heavy anvil rests on a lighter anvil, weighing approximately 20 pounds. The smaller anvil, which is actually part of an old railway tie, is knocked down.

Black powder is placed between the anvils. Plasticine surrounds the gunpowder in the shape of a ring. The blacksmith pushes the smaller anvil down to form a seal. Then the barrel wick is lit.

Jerod Dack lit the fuse once. The honor also went to Brandon’s son, Cayden Clampitt, and Adam’s 13-year-old daughter, Madison Dack.







Stuhr Museu, anvil shooting

The top anvil fires in the air during one of three anvil firings Monday at the Stuhr Museum.


Jeff Bahr, Independent


“If you don’t like gunpowder, you’re not a Dack,” Cayden, 12, said after the explosions.

Randy Dack’s widow, Sarah, was not surprised by the good crowd. Who doesn’t love smoke, gunpowder and bong? she asked.

The anvil fire initially had nothing to do with the 4th of July. Originally, the inhabitants of a village pulled an anvil to call people to town.

“If there was a fire, if there was an Indian attack – whatever, they could fire the anvil, and that singing anvil would draw people in,” said Oshlo, who explained the history of the proceedings. before Monday’s shooting.

When done correctly, the chanting of an anvil can be heard from great distances, Oshlo said.

Over time, anvil shooting became an Independence Day tradition in Stuhr and other localities.

Dack worked at Stuhr for just under 25 years. His sons plan to continue pulling the anvil every year.







Stuhr Museum, anvil shooting

Brandon, Jerod and Adam Dack carried on their father’s tradition on Monday at the Stuhr Museum.


Jeff Bahr, Independent


“Dad was important enough to keep the arts of the last years alive,” said Adam Dack.

Not only was he a master blacksmith, but he participated in the Civil War and the reenactment of the Mountain Man. He was also a wheelwright. It “could do anything from nails to hardware for your home,” Adam said.

Nothing gave her more joy than finding an old object and then trying to replicate it, Sarah said. She was also constantly surprised by her knowledge of history.

“He touched so many lives,” she said.

Two of Monday’s anvil shots were successful. The middle one sucked.

The Dack brothers thought it went pretty well on their first outing. In the past, they helped their father, but they are still learning the nuances.

To prepare, Jerod and Brandon Dack went out last weekend to shoot the anvil three or four times.







Stuhr Museu, anvil shooting

Jerod Dack stands on the anvil to create a seal for Monday’s explosion. At left is Brandon Dack. Leaning to the right is Adam Dack.


Jeff Bahr, Independent


In addition to the Stuhr Museum, Adam remembers his father shooting the anvil during festivities at the Clay Center.

Randy Dack graduated from Oklahoma Horseshoeing School in 1980. Prior to his death, he underwent five-way bypass surgery. An artery burst three days after surgery.

Monday’s anvil shooting took place after the German-language service at Immanuel Lutheran Church. The service was led, as usual, by Paul Hofrichter, who also played panpipes.

Jeri Erickson played the organ during the service and the German Liederkranz singers performed.

A parade was held at 2 p.m., followed by a concert of patriotic music, presented by the Silver Cornet Band, and a program.

A host of traditional races were held for the children after the program.

Monday’s events at the Stuhr Museum kicked off the city’s 150th anniversary celebration. Mayor Roger Steele was on hand.

Admission was free for everyone on Monday, thanks to the help of the Greater Grand Island Community Foundation.

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Museum receives public funding despite ties to group that champions white supremacist narrative https://laprairie-shlm.com/museum-receives-public-funding-despite-ties-to-group-that-champions-white-supremacist-narrative/ Sun, 03 Jul 2022 21:03:54 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/museum-receives-public-funding-despite-ties-to-group-that-champions-white-supremacist-narrative/ The Lion & Tusk Museum in Tauranga. Photo / Provided A controversial Tauranga museum accused of commemorating ‘white supremacy’ has received funding from the Te Papa Tongarewa National Museum. The Lion & Tusk Museum was established in 2018 by the Rhodesian Services Association, which is dedicated to commemorating the military history of Rhodesia (now known […]]]>

The Lion & Tusk Museum in Tauranga. Photo / Provided

A controversial Tauranga museum accused of commemorating ‘white supremacy’ has received funding from the Te Papa Tongarewa National Museum.

The Lion & Tusk Museum was established in 2018 by the Rhodesian Services Association, which is dedicated to commemorating the military history of Rhodesia (now known as Zimbabwe and Zambia).

The museum was the subject of heated discussion after a video was uploaded to TikTok earlier this year.

The top liked comment on the video reads: “I think most people in Tga (Tauranga) have never heard of it or know what Rhodesian is about. I’m shaken [sic] – I lived there most of my life until last year.”

Rhodesian Services Association editor Hugh Bomford said they had successfully applied for Te Papa’s $2,000 grant to help pay the salaries of their curators.

Te Papa confirmed that Lion & Tusk received the money as part of the Helping Hands grant in April last year.

A Te Papa representative said the grant eligibility criteria have been expanded to include support for operational costs – including salaries and wages – due to pressures caused by Covid-19.

They declined to say whether the museum supports white supremacy.

Prof Mohan Dutta, a Massey University expert on social cohesion, said the Rhodesian Services Association supports and spreads “the white supremacist narrative”.

“Rhodesia is so critical here because an organization like the Rhodesian Services Association not only celebrates white supremacy as a structure, but a military structure capable of committing serious forms of violence to control black people, indigenous peoples and people of color,” he said. said.

On display at the Lion & Tusk Museum in Tauranga.  Photo / Provided
On display at the Lion & Tusk Museum in Tauranga. Photo / Provided

The Lion & Tusk Museum has Professor Dutta worried about the spate of racist incidents in Tauranga this year.

These include the anonymous distribution of white supremacist flyers among homes in the area, bus drivers experiencing racial abuse and threats, and Te Pāti Māori’s refusal to stand as a candidate in the recent by-election due to threats from white supremacists.

“For security and policing, this is something worth considering carefully, because the fact that these speeches are coming from the same geographic space is concerning.”

Dutta said the use of Rhodesian symbols has become popular recently, as Nazi symbols have been either banned or condemned.

“We have certainly seen an upsurge in Rhodesian symbols as they allow white supremacists to identify with each other, but also to recruit others into this ideology.”

Dutta questions whether public funding should be used to support what he described as a “racist infrastructure”.

“A lot of times we will find quite traditional politicians who are actually connected to these organizations. I think that needs to be looked at closely,” he said.

“We see this as a global phenomenon, including in Australia and New Zealand, where people recruited into these white supremacist organizations sometimes have military connections, as evidenced by the museum’s association with the donor and veteran of the ‘US Army, Kevin Smith.’

Museum curator Tony Fraser said Lion & Tusk’s aim was to give soldiers, ex-Rhodesians and Zimbabweans a place for their memorabilia.

“There are exhibits from all walks of life, with a distinct leaning towards the military service of these people,” he said.

Fraser is not Rhodesian or Zimbabwean himself, but lived in Zimbabwe in the early 80s and wanted to “give back”.

“I have no political affiliation with the place. I am in favor of the story and that should not be forgotten.”

He also disagrees with Rhodesia being portrayed as white supremacist.

“They were just people trying to make a living – like New Zealanders do.”

Fraser says New Zealanders like the late Garfield Todd are commemorated at the museum.

Todd was an Invercargill-born man who moved to Rhodesia in 1934 as a Protestant missionary to run a school and eventually became Prime Minister there.

During his political career, he championed many policies aimed at improving the lives of the black majority in Rhodesia.

He was later condemned as a traitor by white Rhodesians for coordinating the isolation and embargo of Rhodesia and supporting the legitimization of black nationalist groups.

Fraser argues that the Lion & Tusk is “not a political museum” and that it is important to remember the positive and negative parts of history.

The infamous Rhodesian Prime Minister, Ian Smith, who campaigned for a “whiter and brighter Rhodesia” and opposed black majority rule there, is also commemorated by the Lion & Tusk Museum.

“Even the so-called ‘evil prime minister’ Smith nearly lost his life several times fighting the Nazis.

“We celebrate the military history of a colony that fought for the British Empire, just as New Zealand did.”

According to Fraser, the majority of the museum’s funding comes from membership and online sales of memorabilia and military badges that people can wear on their berets on Anzac Day, so that “non-political ex-servicemen “may commemorate their dead.

Dutta thinks this could mean events like Anzac Day are being co-opted by white supremacists.

“In the research on white supremacy in Aotearoa and Australia, one of the things that seems pretty clear is that white supremacy is quite prominent here in both online and offline spaces.”

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Let’s explore the Kite Museum in South Jakarta https://laprairie-shlm.com/lets-explore-the-kite-museum-in-south-jakarta/ Sat, 02 Jul 2022 06:10:31 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/lets-explore-the-kite-museum-in-south-jakarta/ This kite museum also stores kites from abroad, such as Turkey, Netherlands, South Korea, Philippines, Cambodia, India, Japan, China, Thailand , Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Sweden and France. Several tourist destinations offer a myriad of options for families and school children to spend their school holidays in the even semester of the 2021-2022 school year. Apart […]]]>

This kite museum also stores kites from abroad, such as Turkey, Netherlands, South Korea, Philippines, Cambodia, India, Japan, China, Thailand , Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Sweden and France.

Several tourist destinations offer a myriad of options for families and school children to spend their school holidays in the even semester of the 2021-2022 school year.

Apart from malls, which are very common, museums can also be a choice.

Jakarta is the city with the highest number of museums in Indonesia, reaching more than 70, which can be visited by the public, according to the official website of Statistics Indonesia (BPS).

By visiting museums, school children not only gain a plethora of benefits, such as learning agility and creativity, but they can also gain in-depth knowledge of history which can then be useful when learning. entering the new school year.

One of the many museums in Jakarta is the Layang-Layang Museum, or the Indonesia Kite Museum, located on H Kamang Street, Pondok Labu, South Jakarta. This museum offers several activities, such as painting and making kites, painting umbrellas, and observing the history of kites.

“I took the children to the kite museum because I wanted to give (them) a useful vacation. So when they start school they can tell their experiences,” said Winda Surci, a resident. de Solo, who visited the museum on Thursday (June 30), said.

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The Kite Museum presents several types of kites originating from Indonesia and also from overseas.

By paying an entrance ticket of Rp 20,000 for children and Rp 25,000 for adult visitors, the museum will invite them to try new things that are not commonly done at home or at school.

“By paying tickets, visitors will be able to enjoy three activities: first, it is to watch a historical film about kites; then there is a visit to the museum to learn more about kites, and finally, they will learn how to make kites out of paper,” explained kite museum tour guide Asep Irawan.

Paper kites can also be decorated and taken home.

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Inside the museum

The museum building, constructed with Balinese and Javanese architectural styles, stands on an area of ​​2,750 m². and is filled with several lush trees.

The relaxing atmosphere gives visitors the impression that they are not in the south of the capital, which is usually bustling.

The museum, which was inaugurated by the former Minister of Culture and Tourism, I Gede Ardhika, on March 21, 2003, made it the first kite museum in Indonesia.

“The presence of the kite museum aims to preserve the characteristics of Indonesian culture through the art of kite,” Irawan noted.

Before it became a museum, the owner, Endang W. Puspoyo, initially focused on the beauty industry sector.

At first, Puspoyo opened a kite gallery, and she was quite fond and happy of the kite world.

In the 1990s, Puspoyo often invited kite artists from various regions to participate in festivals to bring the art of kites to life in Indonesia.

It was from these artists that Puspoyo obtained several kites, as those who came to the festival donated many of their works to display in the museum and some even sold their works after the festival was over.

“During the festival, not all the kites were taken home, as some were sold for the (artists’) return fare, and some were given away for display in the gallery,” said notice Iraqan.

“As the number of kites (donated to the museum) increased, Puspoyo then had the idea to open this museum,” he added.

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Variety of kites

The Indonesia Kite Museum not only stores works by artists from all parts of Indonesia, but there are several kites from artists around the world in this pendhapa-shaped building.

This pendhapa, or pavilion, houses unique kites from the smallest size measuring two centimeters to the largest reaching 5×3 meters (m).

“This museum also has a kite with a length of 100m, but it doesn’t fit in the exhibit,” Irawan said.

Irawan, who also works as a kite artist, explained that this museum has a large collection of kites as souvenirs when visiting kite festivals abroad.

“Usually if we go or they come here, some are also donated to the museum,” he said.

The wooden-floored museum building exhibits at least 20 collections of kites from foreign countries.

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Irawan said the presentation aims to highlight that kites are not only popular in Indonesia but also in the global community.

“This kite museum also stores kites from abroad, such as Turkey, Netherlands, South Korea, Philippines, Cambodia, India, Japan, China, Thailand , Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Sweden and France,” he said.

Additionally, the museum has a replica of Indonesia’s first kite. In the past, Irawan explained, kites were made of natural materials, such as kolope (tuber) leaves. The shape of the kite was diamond shaped and originated from the Muna Island area of ​​Southeast Sulawesi.

The kites took three to seven days to make and they are used by ancient humans to seek God.

“The earliest history (of kites is) in Indonesia. There is even research that (claims) that this kite is the first in the world. There is only the replica here. Historically, ancient humans flew the kite to seek God, but they failed to find (God),” he said.

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Military Museum and Pritzker Library Names Three Veterans as 2022 Citizen Soldier Award Recipients https://laprairie-shlm.com/military-museum-and-pritzker-library-names-three-veterans-as-2022-citizen-soldier-award-recipients/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 05:28:36 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/military-museum-and-pritzker-library-names-three-veterans-as-2022-citizen-soldier-award-recipients/ The Pritzker Military Museum & Library is proud to announce the recipients of the 2022 Citizen Soldier Award: Lieutenant Colonel Enoch Woodhouse, Colonel Jack Jacobs and General Ann Dunwoody. The awards will be presented at the 2022 Liberty Gala, “Honoring Strength Through Diversity”. on Saturday, November 5 at the Hilton Chicago hotel. The Citizen Soldier […]]]>

The Pritzker Military Museum & Library is proud to announce the recipients of the 2022 Citizen Soldier Award: Lieutenant Colonel Enoch Woodhouse, Colonel Jack Jacobs and General Ann Dunwoody. The awards will be presented at the 2022 Liberty Gala, “Honoring Strength Through Diversity”. on Saturday, November 5 at the Hilton Chicago hotel.

The Citizen Soldier Award honors a person who exemplifies the traditions of the citizen soldier established by George Washington, a person who has served the nation as a leader in war and peace, for the betterment of the common good. The recipient must have served in the U.S. Armed Forces, Active, Guards, or Reserves, and is active or honorably discharged. The winner must also display a commitment to non-partisan issues and demonstrate an ability to bridge political divides. Recipients of the Citizen Soldier Award are selected by a committee of Pritzker Military Museum & Library Board members and non-Board volunteers and Col. (IL) Jennifer N. Pritzker, IL ARNG ( retired), president and founder of the Museum and the Library.

“The Museum and Library are proud to present their highest honor at the 2022 Freedom Gala to three exemplary individuals who embody the meaning of the citizen soldier,” said Pritzker Military Museum and Library founder Col. (IL) Jennifer N. Pritzker, IL ARNG. (Retired). “The kind of sacrifices, commitment and accomplishments of each of our honorees speaks to the importance of both service and advocating for the greater good of our country. It is truly an honor for us to celebrate and to recognize such deserving people.”

Lt. Col. Enoch Woodhouse enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1944. He then served as a finance officer for the Tuskegee Airmen from 1946 to 1948. After military desegregation in 1948, he continued to serve in reserve for the newly formed Air Force in 1949. His military service earned him numerous awards, including the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest honor given by the U.S. Congress to individuals or institutions for their achievements and their distinguished contributions. He and other Tuskegee Airmen received the President George W. Bush Medal in 2006.

Colonel Jack Jacobs entered military service in 1966, as an ROTC second lieutenant assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division and deployed to Vietnam as a military adviser. During a mission in the Mekong Delta, his battalion came under enemy fire. Wounded in the head and arms, Jack took command of the battered unit, mounting a defense and repeatedly breaking through heavy fire to save wounded soldiers and recover weapons, single-handedly scattering enemy squads, killing at least three enemy soldiers. Jack’s gallant actions and extraordinary heroism saved the lives of an American adviser and 13 Allied soldiers. For his service in Vietnam, Jack added two Silver Stars, three Bronze Stars and two Purple Hearts to his list of decorations.

General Ann Dunwoody was the first woman to command a battalion of the 82nd Airborne Division in 1992. Ann became Fort Bragg’s first female general officer in 2000 and the first woman to command the Combined Arms Support Command at Fort Lee, in Virginia. In 2005, she became the highest ranked woman in the Army when she was promoted to lieutenant general as Deputy Army Chief of Staff, G-4 (Logistics). In November 2008, General Dunwoody became the first woman in military history to achieve the rank of four-star general. As commanding general of the U.S. Army Materiel Command, one of the Army’s largest commands, Ann served with distinction. Throughout his career, General Dunwoody remained a strong supporter of decreasing sexual assault within the United States military.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

“Lt. Col. Woodhouse, Col. Jacobs and General Dunwoody are extraordinary examples of what it means to be a citizen soldier,” said Susan Rifkin, acting president of the Pritzker Military Museum and Library. “Colonel Jacobs acted courageously to save his fellow soldier. LTC Woodhouse played a pivotal role in the early integration of the US Armed Forces. created progress for all female members of the service. The achievements of our laureates demonstrate their extraordinary leadership, strength and diversity.

The 2022 Liberty Gala, to be held Saturday, November 5 at the Hilton Chicago hotel, will celebrate the work of the Pritzker Military Museum & Library and honor the achievements and service of citizen soldiers of the United States Armed Forces, past and present. This year’s theme is “Honoring Strength Through Diversity”.

For more information on the Liberty Gala or to learn more about the nominees for the Citizen Soldier Award, please visit the website at PritzkerMilitary.org.

About the Pritzker Military Museum and Library

The Pritzker Military Museum & Library aims to increase the public’s understanding of military history, military affairs and national security by providing a forum for the study and exploration of our military – past, present and future – with special emphasis on their stories, sacrifices and values. With national and global reach, these spaces and events aim to share the stories of those who served and their contributions as citizen soldiers, helping citizens around the world appreciate the relationship between the armed forces and the civilians they protect. freedoms. A non-governmental and non-partisan organization, the Museum & Library showcases a variety of collections, scholarly initiatives and public programs, from its flagship center in downtown Chicago to its world-class research facility and park currently under construction in Somers, NY. Wisconsin.

]]> A new Danish museum chronicles the personal plight of refugees https://laprairie-shlm.com/a-new-danish-museum-chronicles-the-personal-plight-of-refugees/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 06:02:17 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/a-new-danish-museum-chronicles-the-personal-plight-of-refugees/ Oksbøl (Denmark) (AFP) – Built on the site of a German World War II refugee camp, a new Danish museum which opens on Wednesday sheds light on personal stories of forced migration, past and present. Denmark’s new FLUGT (“flee” in Danish) refugee museum, in the small town of Oksbol on the west coast of Jutland […]]]>

Oksbøl (Denmark) (AFP) – Built on the site of a German World War II refugee camp, a new Danish museum which opens on Wednesday sheds light on personal stories of forced migration, past and present.

Denmark’s new FLUGT (“flee” in Danish) refugee museum, in the small town of Oksbol on the west coast of Jutland near the German border, focuses primarily on German refugees, as well as others who have come to Denmark over the years.

Exhibits include personal items – from a tent to a teddy bear – that tell the intimate stories of people who fled war and oppression in Afghanistan, Bosnia, Chile, Germany, Hungary, Iran , Lebanon, Russia, Syria and Vietnam, among others.

“We want to tell the story behind these numbers, there are real people,” museum director Claus Kjeld Jensen told AFP ahead of the opening on Wednesday.

But for some, the museum’s open philosophy stands in contrast to Denmark’s approach to refugees, with successive governments on the right and left pursuing one of the toughest immigration policies in Europe.

“More relevant than ever”

As World War II drew to a bloody end, around 250,000 Germans fled to Denmark as the Russian Red Army approached.

About 35,000 of them found their way to the Oksbol refugee camp, instantly making the site Denmark’s fifth largest city in terms of population.

UNHCR representative Henrik Nordentoft admitted there are ‘challenges’ in Danish refugee policy John Randeris Ritzau Scanpix/AFP

The camp, in operation from 1945 to 1949, had schools, a theater and a workshop, all behind barbed wire.

Today, not much remains of the camp, apart from two old hospital buildings and a cemetery, hidden in the middle of a thick green forest.

“We have this part of world history happening right here where we stand. But there is a real situation today,” Kjeld Jensen said.

“We have many more refugees in the world than we had at the end of World War II. So I guess the question is much more relevant today than it ever was.”

Queen Margrethe II of Denmark attended the official inauguration of the museum on June 25 with German Vice-Chancellor Robert Habeck. The German state contributed around 1.5 million euros ($1.58 million) to the 16 million euro project.

“None of us would have thought it would be so sadly common to talk about refugees and flight,” the 82-year-old monarch said.

fresh movement

In 2021, the total number of people forced to flee their homes due to conflict, violence, fear of persecution and human rights abuses was 89.3 million, according to UNHCR, the UN agency United for Refugees.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has sparked new movements across Europe, with more than six million refugees fleeing across borders, according to UNHCR.

Queen Margrethe II of Denmark attended the official inauguration of the museum on June 25 with German Vice-Chancellor Robert Habeck
Queen Margrethe II of Denmark attended the official inauguration of the museum on June 25 with German Vice-Chancellor Robert Habeck James BrooksAFP

The new museum was designed by world-renowned Danish architect Bjarke Ingels, who recently completed Google’s new Silicon Valley headquarters and is set to design a new American slavery museum in Fort Worth, Australia. Texas.

Ingels’ design connects the two surviving hospital buildings to a new circular construction covered in rusted steel. Inside, towering timber frames stretch into the sky, creating a large open foyer, from which visitors explore the exhibits.

“When you come here from the outside, you see this kind of corten steel enclosed corrugated wall,” Ingels explained.

Exhibits include personal items - from a tent to a teddy bear - that tell the intimate stories of people who fled war and oppression
Exhibits include personal items – from a tent to a teddy bear – that tell the intimate stories of people who fled war and oppression John Randeris Ritzau Scanpix/AFP

“But then when you move inside, you realize there’s this oasis or sanctuary that opens up into the forest, which is sort of what the fugitives hopefully found here. – a sanctuary from war and a glimpse of a brighter future.”

Fortress Denmark

In mid-2020, Denmark became the first country in the European Union to review the asylum files of several hundred Syrians from Damascus, deeming their return safe. It also plans to open asylum centers outside Europe where applicants would be sent to live.

In 2021, only 2,099 people applied for asylum in Denmark.

UNHCR representative Henrik Nordentoft admitted there were “challenges” in Danish refugee policy.

In 2021, the total number of people forced to flee their homes due to conflict, violence, fear of persecution and human rights violations was 89.3 million, according to UNHCR.
In 2021, the total number of people forced to flee their homes due to conflict, violence, fear of persecution and human rights violations was 89.3 million, according to UNHCR. John Randeris Ritzau Scanpix/AFP

“These are very politically driven and we hope, of course, that there will be a way to change that,” he said.

The museum’s opening brought together 82-year-old Jorg Baden, who fled Germany for Denmark in 1945 aged five, as well as more recent arrivals including a 16-year-old who fled Syria in 2015 and a group of Ukrainian Classical Musicians who arrived earlier this year.

It’s a reminder, as Baden said, that “Flugt isn’t just a thing of the past, it touches our lives today.”

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Vermont National Guard Museum Celebrates Korean War Veteran Appreciation Day https://laprairie-shlm.com/vermont-national-guard-museum-celebrates-korean-war-veteran-appreciation-day/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 14:46:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/vermont-national-guard-museum-celebrates-korean-war-veteran-appreciation-day/ The Vermont National Guard Museum held a special event Saturday to honor Korean War veterans, marking the anniversary of the invasion of North Korea more than 70 years ago. The event presented a brief history of the war, including the effects it had here at home and abroad. Attendees had the chance to hear from […]]]>

The Vermont National Guard Museum held a special event Saturday to honor Korean War veterans, marking the anniversary of the invasion of North Korea more than 70 years ago. The event presented a brief history of the war, including the effects it had here at home and abroad. Attendees had the chance to hear from veterans and their experiences from their time in service. Korean War veteran John Roach says it was great to be recognized and to share some wisdom with younger generations. your duty,” Roach said. David Warren, a staff volunteer with the Vermont National Guard Museum, says preserving history is crucial. “It’s great to give back because we’re losing these veterans,” Warren said. “There are very few World War II veterans, a few more Korean War veterans. We lose them every day and so the ability to just say thank you listens to them.” Museum officials say it is important to preserve the history and stories of those who served, ensuring they are never forgotten.

The Vermont National Guard Museum held a special event Saturday to honor Korean War veterans, marking the anniversary of the invasion of North Korea more than 70 years ago.

The event presented a brief history of the war, including the effects it had here at home and abroad.

Attendees had the chance to hear from veterans and their experiences from their time in service.

Korean War veteran John Roach says it was great to be recognized and to share some wisdom with younger generations.

“I was hoping they would have learned something from it, that patriotism is there and when the country is in trouble, you have to get up and do your duty,” Roach said.

David Warren, a staff volunteer with the Vermont National Guard Museum, says preserving history is crucial.

“It’s great to give back because we’re losing these veterans,” Warren said. “There are very few World War II veterans, a few more Korean War veterans. We lose them every day and so the ability to just say thank you listens to them.”

Museum officials say it is important to preserve the history and stories of those who served, ensuring they are never forgotten.

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Baltimore Mayor Supports Organizing Efforts at Walters Art Museum https://laprairie-shlm.com/baltimore-mayor-supports-organizing-efforts-at-walters-art-museum/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 23:21:34 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/baltimore-mayor-supports-organizing-efforts-at-walters-art-museum/ By David Lance, AFRO MDDC Intern Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott stands in solidarity with Walters Art Museum employees in their efforts to unionize with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Council 67. A majority of Walters Art Museum staff expressed desires to form a union, their group is called “Walters Workers […]]]>

By David Lance,
AFRO MDDC Intern

Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott stands in solidarity with Walters Art Museum employees in their efforts to unionize with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Council 67. A majority of Walters Art Museum staff expressed desires to form a union, their group is called “Walters Workers United”.

“We are the Walters Art Museum. We engage and strengthen our community by collecting, preserving and interpreting art,” they said. “We form our union to take care of our most valuable assets – the people who work here and the communities we serve.”

Mayor Scott released a statement on June 21 showing his support for Walters Workers United. “I want to express my support for all Walters Art Museum employees in their efforts to form the union, Walters Workers United, with AFSCME Council 67. All Walters employees are invaluable assets to the museum, its work and the City of Baltimore,” Scott said.

I support Walters Workers United in its demand for a neutral election agreement similar to the election agreement recently signed by the Baltimore Museum of Art and AFSCME,” Scott continued. “The Walters is ultimately an agency of the city of Baltimore. It is supported by public funds and as such has a responsibility to uphold democratic values ​​and respect the collective will of its employees to form one wall-to-wall union in their workplace.

Other institutions, such as the Museum of the City of New York, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn’s Children Museum, the Milwaukee Public Museum and the Milwaukee Art Museum have all gone through unionization processes and recognize all of their employees under a same union. Scott urges the Walters to do the same.

“There’s no reason the Walters shouldn’t go the way of the Baltimore Museum of Art in signing an election agreement and having an election conducted by a neutral third-party arbitrator,” Scott said.

To support Walters Workers United, you can sign a union card at: https://www.waltersworkersunited.org/

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The future of the Royal BC Museum is unclear after Horgan’s raid on the new https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-future-of-the-royal-bc-museum-is-unclear-after-horgans-raid-on-the-new/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 23:15:22 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-future-of-the-royal-bc-museum-is-unclear-after-horgans-raid-on-the-new/ Breadcrumb Links New Local News Options include a network of small museums across British Columbia instead of a central institution A visitor peeks over the Woolly Mammoth at the Royal BC Museum. Photo by Debra Brash /Victoria Times columnist Content of the article Tourists from Texas and Idaho, along with schoolchildren from across British Columbia, […]]]>

Options include a network of small museums across British Columbia instead of a central institution

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Tourists from Texas and Idaho, along with schoolchildren from across British Columbia, strolled through the Royal BC Museum’s natural history gallery on Thursday, snapping photos in front of the woolly mammoth.

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At just $5, entry is about the same price as a latte at the adjacent cafe.

The cashier explained that the reduced price was due to the empty third floor that once housed the Old Town exhibit and First Peoples galleries, but was stripped in January in an effort to “decolonize.”

The half-empty museum’s future remains unclear a day after Premier John Horgan announced the province was abandoning its much-maligned $789 million plan to close, demolish and rebuild the museum by 2030 .

Horgan’s about-face on what the opposition has called a ‘vanity museum project’ raises questions about how the 54-year-old institution will bounce back from being branded seismically dangerous and riddled with asbestos .

One possibility is to completely abandon the model of a single provincial museum in Victoria in favor of smaller satellite museums across British Columbia.

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The Premier raised the prospect of a decentralized model for the museum that would energize rural areas of British Columbia and empower Indigenous communities to showcase their history.

“Is the location the only location for a museum?” Horgan reflects on Wednesday. “Are we going to decentralize, in response to a previous question about whether we stimulate more activity in rural areas, and take some of these artifacts and return them to the territories where they came from, whether they are indigenous or not? So I think there is a big opportunity to reduce costs as a result of these conversations.

Bruce Williams, CEO of the Greater Victoria Chamber of Commerce, said that although Horgan made the right decision to stop the demolition, he is concerned about the prospect of Victoria losing an anchor attraction.

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“We hope that rumors or gossip that this actually leaves Victoria does not occur, as it would figuratively and literally leave a big hole in our tourism economy,” Williams said. “The tourism sector has just gone through arguably the worst two years in its history. And to add to that, removing this anchor tenant from this region would be disastrous.

If the original teardown and rebuilding had taken place, the museum planned to take exhibits on the road during its eight-year closure. It is unclear whether the idea of ​​satellite exhibits is still valid.

Royal BC Museum CEO Alicia Dubois initially agreed to an interview with Postmedia News, but suddenly canceled on Thursday.

The Ministry of Tourism said in a statement that the museum will consider how best to use the space until plans for the museum are finalized.

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“The museum continues to provide British Columbians and visitors with additional opportunities to enjoy the galleries, including webinars, traveling and satellite exhibits, and e-learning. The museum has also captured the galleries – including the Old Town – via a 3D tour, which will be released online this year.

The province will move forward with the construction of a $224 million archives and collections building in Colwood, a suburb of Victoria. With a completion date of 2025, the building will eventually house many of the artifacts currently stored in the museum’s 14-story Fannin Building wing.

The museum is also in the process of repatriating objects belonging to indigenous communities.

Tourism Minister Melanie Mark, who is Nisga’a, Gitxsan, Cree and Ojibway, said in May that returning the totem pole that belongs to the Nuxalk First Nation is complicated because you have to remove the walls to get it out. Nuxalk hereditary chief Snuxyaltwa, also known as Deric Snow, is suing the Royal BC Museum and the BC government for failing to return the pole carved by his great-grandfather, Louis Snow.

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Horgan pointed out that the museum is in desperate need of renovation, but he is not in favor of a renovation because it is impractical and dangerous to demolish asbestos-filled walls while still open to visitors.

A business plan released by Mark on May 25 showed that refurbishing the building – which lacks space to host world-class exhibitions, is seismically unstable and houses invaluable materials below sea level – would cost as much as tearing it down and starting over. .

With white drywall closing off access to the third floor, the rest of the space is limited to a haphazard assortment of wartime exhibits on the incarceration of Japanese Canadians, a multimedia project on social distancing COVID and the decades-unaltered natural history exhibit featuring replica wildlife.

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Asked Wednesday how the museum can revitalize itself given that the third-floor gallery has already been stripped bare, Horgan said there were seven million artifacts “and some of them haven’t seen the light of day for generations”.

“So I don’t believe there will be any difficulty in filling the spaces in the exhibition hall to ensure that there is a very full and complete flavor of the whole history and tapestry of this that makes British Columbia so unique,” ​​he said.

The museum will undertake a province-wide consultation process to hear the ideas of British Columbians on the future of the museum. Details have yet to be released.

Geneva Standbridge, a teacher with British Columbia’s EBUS Academy distance learning program, toured the museum Thursday with a dozen students and parents. She was glad that Horgan had listened to the feedback and heard that now was not the right time for such an expensive undertaking.

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Victoria student Fred Jennings, 13, said he was saddened by news that the museum would be closed for eight years.

Fred Jennings and Geneva Standbridge look at the woolly mammoth at the Royal BC Museum on Thursday, a day after Premier John Horgan announced the province was scrapping the $789 million replacement project.  Credit: Katie DeRosa/PNG
Fred Jennings and Geneva Standbridge look at the woolly mammoth at the Royal BC Museum on Thursday, a day after Premier John Horgan announced the province was scrapping the $789 million replacement project. Credit: Katie DeRosa/PNG Katie DeRosa

“There hasn’t been a museum for a long time,” he says. Asked about his favorite exhibit, Jennings answered Old Town. Students love interactive and immersive exhibits, he said. If he had a say in what will replace the old town, he would like to see a recreation of Fort Victoria, a Hudson’s Bay Company fur trading post.

Reflecting on the public reaction that led to his takedown, Horgan, a frequent visitor to the museum since childhood, said he couldn’t bear to see a provincial treasure turned into a political football or a “laugh line at a party or on the football field”. .”

He remains “relentlessly optimistic” about the future of the institution, whoever and wherever it is.

kderosa@postmedia.com


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New exhibit at the Petersen Automotive Museum reveals legendary McLaren racing cars https://laprairie-shlm.com/new-exhibit-at-the-petersen-automotive-museum-reveals-legendary-mclaren-racing-cars/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 15:57:12 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/new-exhibit-at-the-petersen-automotive-museum-reveals-legendary-mclaren-racing-cars/ Formula 1 racer MCL33 2018 Courtesy of the Petersen Automotive Museum / ted7.com The Petersen Automotive Museum is hosting a new exhibition this summer to celebrate McLaren and its founder, famed New Zealand racing driver Bruce McLaren. Famous not only for being impressive on the track, Bruce McLaren has carved out a sport for himself […]]]>

The Petersen Automotive Museum is hosting a new exhibition this summer to celebrate McLaren and its founder, famed New Zealand racing driver Bruce McLaren.

Famous not only for being impressive on the track, Bruce McLaren has carved out a sport for himself in the motor racing industry as a designer, engineer, inventor and team manager. That feat was extraordinary in itself, but his contributions to the sport didn’t stop there. After creating Bruce McLaren Motor Racing, this enigmatic personality and company went on to design what is considered to be one of the most remarkable and creative racing cars in motor racing. What’s more, the legacy built by McLaren continued even after Bruce passed away in the early 70s. So much so that the McLaren racing team still retains the title of the second most successful racing team in history. of Formula 1.

The exhibition, titled “The Color of Success: McLaren’s Papaya Livery”, just opened on June 18 to the public. In addition to representative cars from several racing disciplines, The color of success also features vital moments from the team’s 60-year history. Automotive enthusiasts can experience this exclusive look at iconic racing and road-going creations in the Charles Nearburg Family Gallery, located on the second floor of the museum.

The main focus of the exhibition will be McLaren’s ‘papaya orange’ period. Although there are some theories about Why McLaren chose this distinctive color, no doubt it made these cars stand out and quickly became a defining feature of this team’s automobiles. The groundbreaking racing cars on display are examples of early racing vehicles created and built by McLaren from Can-Am, Formula 1, USAC, Formula 2 and Formula 5000.

Among the crown jewels is the 1967 McLaren M6A. This historic car was developed in just eleven weeks. It was the first to feature the now familiar and beloved papaya orange, not to mention it also ushered in McLaren’s era of Can-Am racing dominance.

Other more modern cars will also be on display. In fact, the latest racing car driven by 2018 Formula 1 MCL33 driver Fernando Alonso will also be part of the show. This car’s striking new livery was directly inspired by the classic papaya orange, but also included blue, yellow and red stripes in homage to Spain, Alonso’s home country.

In addition, unique creations like the 1969 M6 GT and the M16 will also be part of this diverse collection. Even though the M6 ​​GT project was unfortunately canceled after the untimely death of its creator, it remained the blueprint for all McLaren road cars. The M16 showcases the breadth of motorsport knowledge McLaren had and won the Indianapolis 500 in 1974 and 1976.

The Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles invites visitors to take a closer look at the life and work of an important motor racing figure whose racing cars and company led the way in design and performance.

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The new historical museum shows what Mount Pleasant looked like before today. https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-new-historical-museum-shows-what-mount-pleasant-looked-like-before-today/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 22:35:15 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-new-historical-museum-shows-what-mount-pleasant-looked-like-before-today/ A local resident of Mt. Pleasant is opening a historical museum. The Dog Town Museum shows what the area looked like before it actually became Mt. Pleasant. Cynthia Kilmer, the president of the museum, has always been interested in the Civil War period. She was a lawyer in the Isabella County area and represented a […]]]>

A local resident of Mt. Pleasant is opening a historical museum.

The Dog Town Museum shows what the area looked like before it actually became Mt. Pleasant.

Cynthia Kilmer, the president of the museum, has always been interested in the Civil War period. She was a lawyer in the Isabella County area and represented a number of Native Americans and learned their stories. A stone and a plaque, exhibited at the site of the old council house, is another of the objects that aroused his interest in history.

“That was part of my initial peak of interest in this area. I saw this rock, Donna and I were cruising around and we saw this rock, and looked at it and I thought, wow c It’s really fascinating,” said Kilmer.

Her inspirations came from Protar’s Home Museum on Beaver Island and she knew she could do the same for Mt. Pleasant. The old house at 981 Craig Hill Rd. was once a business. Kilmer went there one day and asked the owners if they would call him if they were considering selling, a few years later they did. Kilmer was able to put a down payment on the house and bring his idea to fruition.

She has done a lot of research on the history of the area and continues to uncover more. One of his tactics for finding information is to visit cemeteries and look at the tombstones of families who lived in the area. She uses a title search and is able to uncover more information that connects one piece to another.

Kilmer found several different maps that show the layout of the old town and the buildings that stood during different periods.

She hopes to open the museum to the public within the year, but is waiting for the city to approve it. In the meantime, she is looking for and accepting volunteers to help paint and put the finishing touches on the house.

Once the museum is open, admission will cost you nothing. The museum is non-profit. Kilmer isn’t looking for money, she’s just looking to share her interest in the town’s history with the rest of the community.

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