FBI investigates Basquiat paintings at Orlando Museum of Art

On Tuesday, a steady stream of people headed to the Orlando Museum of Art to see a controversial exhibit for themselves: the Jean-Michel Basquiat exhibit. According to the New York Times, the FBI is now investigating whether the artwork was really created by the famous artist who died in 1988. Some art lovers have made the trip to check out the paintings for themselves. “There’s something really special about his work,” said Janet McCabe. McCabe traveled to Orlando from St. Petersburg to see the exhibit, but that’s not even halfway. “I’ve traveled the world actually to see his work,” she said. McCabe said she was shocked to learn of an FBI investigation into her backyard. According to the New York Times, the FBI’s Art Crime Team is investigating the authenticity of the 25 paintings on display at the museum since February, according to a federal subpoena and several people with knowledge of the situation. The specific purpose of the FBI is unclear, according to the Times, but it adds that “the intentional sale of art known to be forged would be a federal crime.” The article also stated that if genuine, the paintings would be worth around $100 million, according to the artwork’s owners’ appraisal group. WESH 2 News contacted the FBI and received the statement: “The FBI can neither confirm nor deny the conduct of particular investigations. Aaron De Groft, director and CEO of the museum, defended the artwork amid questions The New York Times first published in February. “We have no doubts. We stick to it. They are original,” De Groft said. He also added that it is not the job of the museum to authenticate the art. “They came to us authenticated by the best Basquiat specialists,” De Groft told WESH in February. The museum, or OMA as it is known, sent WESH 2 News this statement on Tuesday: “Last year the museum responded to a request for information. The Museum has never been led to believe that it was or was under investigation and never had any FBI activity on site We view our involvement only as a fact witness exposure in a few weeks, we will continue to cooperate if there are future requests. an exhibition this year. The museum did not respond to WESH 2 News as to why there was a change in plans. “I wanted to see it anyway just so I could make up my mind if I thought it was real. or not.” McCabe said. “I’d like to believe they’re real. I would like to believe that tha t just because his work is a gift. It’s definitely a gift.

On Tuesday, a steady stream of people headed to the Orlando Museum of Art to see a controversial exhibit for themselves: the Jean-Michel Basquiat exhibit.

According to the New York Times, the FBI is now investigating whether the artwork was really created by the famous artist who died in 1988. Some art lovers have made the trip to check out the paintings for themselves.

“There’s something really special about his work,” said Janet McCabe.

McCabe traveled to Orlando from St. Petersburg to see the exhibit, but that’s not even halfway.

“I’ve traveled the world actually to see his work,” she said.

McCabe said she was shocked to learn of an FBI investigation into her backyard. According to the New York Times, the FBI’s Art Crime Team is investigating the authenticity of the 25 paintings on display at the museum since February, according to a federal subpoena and several people with knowledge of the situation.

The specific purpose of the FBI is unclear, according to the Times, but it adds that “the intentional sale of art known to be forged would be a federal crime.”

The article also stated that if genuine, the paintings would be worth around $100 million, according to the artwork’s owners’ appraisal group.

WESH 2 News contacted the FBI and received the statement: “The FBI can neither confirm nor deny the conduct of any particular investigations.”

Aaron De Groft, director and CEO of the museum, defended the artwork amid questions that The New York Times first published in February.

“We have no doubts. We stick to it. They are original,” De Groft said.

He also added that it is not the job of the museum to authenticate the art.

“They came to us authenticated by the best Basquiat specialists,” De Groft told WESH in February.

The museum, or OMA as it is known, sent WESH 2 News this statement on Tuesday:

“Last year, the Museum responded to a request for information. The Museum was never led to believe that it was or was under investigation and never had any FBI activity on site. We view our involvement as a fact witness only. As we close ‘Heroes and Monsters’ exhibition in a few weeks, we will continue to cooperate should there be any future enquiries.

According to the museum, the exhibit was originally scheduled to be on display in Orlando until June 2023. Now, the exhibit will be transported to Italy for display this year. The museum did not respond to WESH 2 News to explain why there had been a change in plans.

“I wanted to see it regardless just so I could make up my mind if I thought it was real or not,” McCabe said. “I’d like to believe they’re real. I would like to believe him simply because his work is a gift. It’s definitely a gift.

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