display museum – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 13:42:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://laprairie-shlm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-2-150x150.png display museum – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ 32 32 Family forces museum to take down slavery statue exhibit https://laprairie-shlm.com/family-forces-museum-to-take-down-slavery-statue-exhibit/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 13:14:17 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/family-forces-museum-to-take-down-slavery-statue-exhibit/ J he House Museum was forced to withdraw one exhibit in a row due to the continued presence of a statue of a slave trader on its site. The Hoxton-based museum, formerly known as the Geffrye Museum, is housed in former almshouses built with the money of Sir Robert Geffrye who made his fortune in […]]]>
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he House Museum was forced to withdraw one exhibit in a row due to the continued presence of a statue of a slave trader on its site.

The Hoxton-based museum, formerly known as the Geffrye Museum, is housed in former almshouses built with the money of Sir Robert Geffrye who made his fortune in the slave trade.

His statue stands outside, and his presence has prompted a boycott of the museum by local teachers as well as regular protests campaigning for its removal.

The family of East Londoner Pat Robbins were so offended by the statue that they asked the museum to remove his photograph from its galleries.

The statue of Sir Robert Geffrye outside the House Museum

/ Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The photo, which showed the pensioner at her home in Wanstead with the Syrian refugee family who cared for her during her final years, had been on display at the museum along with an audio installation explaining her story.

Her son Glyn Robbins said the refugee family had lived with his mother for seven years before her death in 2019.

He said: ‘Mum had Alzheimer’s and the family cared for her with a love money can’t buy.

“She provided them with a home and they became part of our family.”

He said he was initially delighted to see the photograph on display until he heard about the statue.

Mr Robbins said: “We have had various discussions with them, arguing that the photo, with all its human qualities, is incompatible with commemorating a slaveholder.

“So we said they had to choose between the statue and the photo. They chose the statue and say they will take the photo down – a shockingly bad decision from an institution that calls itself anti-racist.

The museum said it planned to move the statue to a less prominent site on its grounds and its director, Sonia Solicari, said she was “confident” a planning application to do so would be filed soon.

In an email to Mr Robbins, she said they agreed to remove the photo with ‘great regret and sadness’ and hoped it could be displayed again after the statue was moved.

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Museum of Underwater Art sculptures unveiled ahead of Great Barrier Reef dive site https://laprairie-shlm.com/museum-of-underwater-art-sculptures-unveiled-ahead-of-great-barrier-reef-dive-site/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 02:42:54 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/museum-of-underwater-art-sculptures-unveiled-ahead-of-great-barrier-reef-dive-site/ Concrete sculptures that will soon be submerged on the Great Barrier Reef have arrived in North Queensland as part of the award-winning Underwater Art Museum. Key points: The public dive site should be installed on Magnetic Island in the middle of the year The sculptures were modeled by leading marine scientists and conservationists The attraction […]]]>

Concrete sculptures that will soon be submerged on the Great Barrier Reef have arrived in North Queensland as part of the award-winning Underwater Art Museum.

Eight statues, measuring 2.2 meters tall and weighing several tons, will be installed on the ocean floor off Magnetic Island in Townsville to create a public snorkeling attraction.

“This is the first time this has been done in the Southern Hemisphere,” said Museum of Underwater Art Board Director Paul Victory.

The Ocean Sentinels installation is the museum’s second underwater sculpture project, which established its “coral greenhouse” dive site on John Brewer Reef in 2019.

A diver swims in the ‘coral greenhouse’ off the coast of Townsville.(Provided: Museum of Underwater Art)

“The sculptures are designed to facilitate habitat, both coral and equine fish habitat,” Victory said.

“It’s quite surreal”

The statues were constructed by British artist Jason deCaires Taylor using concrete and stainless steel, before being painstakingly shipped to Townsville.

A man examines a concrete sculpture
Jason deCaires Taylor designed and built the sculptures over two years in his studio in the UK.(Provided: Townsville Enterprise)

They were modeled by pioneering marine scientists and conservationists, whose bodies were transformed with marine life to create hybrid forms.

Among them is Professor Peter Harrison, who was a key member of the research team that discovered massive coral spawning on Magnetic Island in 1981.

“What I really hope is that once [they] are installed, my sculpture and all the other sculptures will begin to be covered in baby corals…and they will become a living part of Magnetic Island’s reef recovery stages.”

A man in scuba gear swims past a large coral formation
Professor Peter Harrison says he is “overwhelmed” to be chosen as the muse.(Provided: Southern Cross University)

Molly Steer, a young environmentalist from Cairns who is campaigning to eradicate single-use plastic straws, was also chosen as the model for one of the statues.

Snorkeling site still undecided

The artwork will be on display at the Museum of Tropical Queensland for the next two months before being installed in their underwater home.

But Mr Victory said the location of the dive trail had not been decided.

Two men in work clothes move a large concrete sculpture into the back of a shipping container
The sculptures have been temporarily installed at the Museum of Tropical Queensland.(Provided: Townsville Enterprise)

“There has been an extensive consultation process with the community on potential sites.”

Some residents had raised environmental concerns about one of the proposed locations.

The final site will be determined by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, with the sculptures due to be installed in June.

A concrete sculpture of a man mixed with large corals
The sculptures, including that of Peter Harrison, combine human anatomy and marine formations.(ABC North Qld: Lily Nothling)

Once operational, Victory said he expects the combination of attractions at the Museum of Underwater Art to attract between 8,000 and 12,000 visitors a year.

Another facility, planned for Palm Island, is still in the community consultation phase.

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Derbyshire Museum packs up ahead of massive refurbishment https://laprairie-shlm.com/derbyshire-museum-packs-up-ahead-of-massive-refurbishment/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 19:15:59 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/derbyshire-museum-packs-up-ahead-of-massive-refurbishment/ We took one last look around, including parts of the collections not usually seen by members of the public. Experts say packing and moving is one of the most stressful things you can do in your life, so try packing, wrapping and labeling around 30,000 historic items, the vast majority of them can never be […]]]>

We took one last look around, including parts of the collections not usually seen by members of the public.

Experts say packing and moving is one of the most stressful things you can do in your life, so try packing, wrapping and labeling around 30,000 historic items, the vast majority of them can never be replaced.

That’s the task facing the Chesterfield Museum team as they prepare to put away their vast and invaluable collection ahead of a major renovation project at Stephenson Memorial Hall, the building the museum calls home.

“We found items that may not have been what we thought they were until you actually pulled them off the shelf.” said Alyson Barnes, head of tourism, museums and events, who walked us through the parts of the collection that the public don’t usually see.

The Chesterfield Museum closed to the public on Tuesday March 1, so work could begin on packing all valuables, some of which can be done by museum staff, other items require the arrival of specialist teams, including the main attraction, a massive wheel used during the construction of the famous Crooked Spire Church.

“It’s about 750 years old and it’s the only one in the country that’s on display in a museum, most of the others were left where they were found. It was used to build the church, so historically it’s connected to the Chesterfield Spire landmark,” said Ms Barnes, who added that there were only five examples of these wheels left in the country and it would take a man to stand by. inside and turns it like a hamster does to its wheel.

The museum opened to the public in 1994 at Stephenson Memorial Hall and contains thousands of artefacts from the famous borough’s history, but the museum needs more space to display as many of the 30,000 items it has in his collection.

Indeed, before closing, at any time, only about 5% of the collection would be on display to the public.

Renovations to the Grade II listed Memorial Hall, which dates back to 1879, are expected to cost around £17million with additional floors opened up giving the museum more floor space in which to display items from the collection.

Renovations are due to begin in early August, and museum staff hope to have everything packed, labeled and in storage by mid-July.

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The largest scroll painting of the Father of the Nation on display at the National Museum https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-largest-scroll-painting-of-the-father-of-the-nation-on-display-at-the-national-museum/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 09:03:48 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-largest-scroll-painting-of-the-father-of-the-nation-on-display-at-the-national-museum/ Mon 28 Feb 2022 15:03 Last updated on: Mon 28 Feb 2022 15:07 The Honorable Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina attended the program virtually. Photo: Courtesy of National Museum of Bangladesh “> The Honorable Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina attended the program virtually. Photo: Courtesy of National Museum of Bangladesh To commemorate the celebration of the centenary […]]]>

The Honorable Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina attended the program virtually. Photo: Courtesy of National Museum of Bangladesh

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The Honorable Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina attended the program virtually. Photo: Courtesy of National Museum of Bangladesh

To commemorate the celebration of the centenary of the birth of the father of the nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, the advertising agency Mattra organized the event, “Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib: Mohajibon Path”, featuring the world’s largest scroll painting. father of the nation, by the famous artist Shahjahan Ahmed Bikash.

As the chief guest, Honorable Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina virtually opened the event yesterday at the Bangamata Begum Fazilatunnesa Mujib Auditorium of the National Museum.

The work will be on display at the museum until May 18.

The program was also attended by Minister of Education, Dr. Dipu Moni, Father of the Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Birth Centenary Celebration, Chief Coordinator of the National Implementation Committee, Dr. Kamal Abdul Naser Chowdhury, and the President of Bangladesh Charushilpi Sangsad, Professor Jamal Uddin Ahmed. , among others.

Beginning with melodious songs based on Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman’s birthday, a video of the 150-foot-long painting, ‘Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib: Mohajibon Path’ in progress, was screened.

Painted in oil color, Shahjahan Ahmed Bikash worked on the artwork between March 17, 2020 and May 18, 2021.

“I tried to express how I accepted Bangabandhu in my heart through my painting,” said Shahjahan Ahmed Bikash. “One day when we are no more, this painting will become a mark of our history for future generations. That’s why I tried to make it as durable as possible.”

“Just looking at the painting, one can tell how much Bikash loves Bangabandhu,” said renowned artist Shahabuddin Ahmed. “This painting embodies our history in itself as evidence of the past. It goes without saying that Bikash put an immense amount of effort and heart into the painting.”

“I have completed 143 feet of painting and another 7 feet are still being drawn,” Shahjahan Ahmed Bikash revealed. “When the painting is complete, it will represent Bangladesh’s 50 years of freedom and history.”

At the end of the video came a short speech by Dr. Kamal Abdul Naser Chowdhury. “During the liberation war, artists also stood alongside Bangabandhu alongside students,” said Dr. Kamal Abdul Naser Chowdhury. “Bangabandhu is our source of inspiration for our local and traditional artwork.”

Renowned artists Afzal Hossain, Jamal Uddin Ahmed, Shahjahan Ahmed Bikash and Minister of Education Dipu Moni also expressed their thoughts during the event.

Towards the end, the Prime Minister shared a few words. “I can’t imagine the love and devotion to the Father of the Nation needed to create such a work of art,” she said.

“My father sacrificed his whole life for Bangladesh, to reward a better life for everyone. “Above his own life, opportunities and family, he put the nation first.”

“There were many malicious attempts to erase his name from the annals of history, whether before liberation or after, but artists have made Bangabandhu immortal in their poems, songs, stories and artworks”, she concluded.

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Sabine County Historic Jail Museum Repairs Approved | Way of life https://laprairie-shlm.com/sabine-county-historic-jail-museum-repairs-approved-way-of-life/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 14:38:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/sabine-county-historic-jail-museum-repairs-approved-way-of-life/ (Sabine County, Texas) The Sabine County Historic Jail Museum has been closed for nearly a year. Damage from the 2021 ice storm damaged the museum and made it unsafe for visitors. Without intervention, the historic building would probably not survive much longer. The library and museum are owned by the county. After exhausting several grant […]]]>

(Sabine County, Texas)

The Sabine County Historic Jail Museum has been closed for nearly a year. Damage from the 2021 ice storm damaged the museum and made it unsafe for visitors. Without intervention, the historic building would probably not survive much longer. The library and museum are owned by the county.

After exhausting several grant options to repair the structure, commissioners agreed on Monday to fund the project. The cost will be $22,000.

Sabine County Historic Jail Museum, names still etched in paint

The names are engraved on the walls of the tiny cells upstairs. Who knows how many people served time in the historic Sabine County Jail. Recognizing some of the surnames is indeed a little scary. The large red-brick structure stands on the west corner of the courthouse plaza serving the county for nearly 80 years. If the walls could talk, they would have incredible stories to tell. Once prisoners get to the second floor, the raw iron bars and tower on the third floor look a bit like a dungeon from a European countryside.

The “Noose” still hangs from the ceiling below the tower, and from the outside it appears as a magnificent piece of architecture. From the inside, the third-floor tower is an eerie reminder of the past. How lonely it seems to stand at the foot of the gallows and the cold concrete walls.

Handmade bricks were used in the construction of the Old Sabine County Jail, which began in 1903. The jail was completed in 1904 and remained in use until 1983.

“The Sabine County Historical Commission received permission in 1986 to restore the jail and operate it as a museum,” said local historian Weldon McDaniel.

One of the standout features is the interior suspension installations. “Other gallows have existed in various places in the courthouse plaza, but no remnants of them remain. An exterior gallows stood just outside the Texas Street entrance to the prison museum “, did he declare. McDaniel added that a cast iron panel on the main entrance vestibule wall marks the location of the lever that released the hatch.

The noose hanging from the tower must have served as a deterrent, as only one hanging is confirmed. “In 1922, a man named Mr. JL Snell was hanged on the rope for slitting his daughter-in-law’s throat, when he disliked the way she worked in his field. A piece of the rope used in the hanging is on display in the museum’s Speights-Boswell-Vanderbilt room,” McDaniel said.

Upon entering the Historic Sabine County Jail Museum and Vergie Speights Memorial Library, the “Bull Run” is the first room. “Visitors can see the original trap door, once located under the prison noose, just above the door above the spiral staircase leading to the prison cells.

After Texas banned hanging as a death sentence in 1924, the prison’s hanging facility could no longer be used. McDaniel said rebar was installed through the hatch opening and the opening was cemented.

In the years since the opening of the historic Sabine County Jail Museum, many descendants of pioneer families have donated treasures, household items, farm implements, pictures, documents, newspapers and other artifacts, resulting in a rather impressive collection.

The Sabine County Historical Jail and Museum is open Wednesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and is located in the Sabine County Courthouse Plaza. Admission is free, venture out and take the tour.

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Lancaster Judges’ Lodging Museum receives an additional £15,000 for slavery project https://laprairie-shlm.com/lancaster-judges-lodging-museum-receives-an-additional-15000-for-slavery-project/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 15:45:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/lancaster-judges-lodging-museum-receives-an-additional-15000-for-slavery-project/ Judges’ Lodgings, which is run by the Lancashire County Council Museum Service, is one of the first recipients of funding from the Association of Independent Museums (AIM) New Stories New Audiences, part of the National Lottery Heritage Fund, for its “Facing the Past” project. project. The museum will work with Lancaster University, the Institute for […]]]>

Judges’ Lodgings, which is run by the Lancashire County Council Museum Service, is one of the first recipients of funding from the Association of Independent Museums (AIM) New Stories New Audiences, part of the National Lottery Heritage Fund, for its “Facing the Past” project. project. The museum will work with Lancaster University, the Institute for Black Atlantic Research at the University of Central Lancashire and the Lancaster Black History Group.

The additional funding will allow Judges’ Lodgings to run school workshops, with children’s works on display at the museum, and to run creative learning sessions about the art and furniture collections on display. It will also include continuing professional development training to help teachers teach this complex subject in the classroom.

It’s part of a larger project, which includes commissioning a series of new portraits of enslaved Africans based on historical descriptions of slaves in Lancaster that appear in the Runaway Slaves in Britain database. ‘University of Glasgow. These portraits will then be exhibited alongside existing portraits of people whose families were involved in the slave trade.

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Lancashire County Council Judges’ Housing Museum.

County Councilor Peter Buckley, Lancashire County Council Cabinet Member for Community and Cultural Services, said: “This project will provide high quality cultural experiences for young people in the town and a reminder of the troubled history of Lancaster with the slave trade.

“This is a fantastic collaborative project and we look forward to working more closely with the Lancaster Black History Group, Lancaster University and UCLan.”

Through collaborative art projects, “Facing the Past” aims to reflect, reveal and repair the omissions in our collective memory of Lancaster’s role in the transatlantic slave trade and the slaves who passed through or remained in the city.

These were developed in response to protesters who spray-painted the words ‘slave trader’ on an 18th century monument to the Rawlinson family, which stands outside the priory church in Lancaster, during the 2020 Black Lives Matter protests.

This prompted Priory Church, Judges’ Lodgings, Lancaster Black History Group and other local partners to come together to see how they could better commemorate enslaved Africans and raise awareness of Lancaster’s role in the slave trade.

Geraldine Onek, Chair of the Lancaster Black History Group, said: “For over a year, the Lancaster Black History Group (LBHG) has worked with various local organizations to explore the family trees of several prominent slave-trading families. .

“Profits from the slave trade in the West Indies and the Americas helped shape Lancaster, while slave traders and their descendants dominated political life here.

“Some of the historical research exists, although much has not been fully explored. LBHG’s goal is to explore this history and connect the missing pieces to tell the stories that need to be told.

“Through education we can fight racism, and by working together to face the past, we can build a better future.”

Following the incident with the Rawlinson family monument in 2020, it was proposed to create an artistic response to portraits of Lancaster slave-trading families.

During these discussions, Alan Rice, a professor of English and American studies at UCLan, pointed out how valuable it would be to have depictions of the slaves of Lancaster’s merchant families, who often lived anonymous lives in the city.

Professor Rice said: ‘It is wonderful that this is now coming to fruition based on some of the lives discovered by myself and local researchers from the Lancaster Black History Group, and additionally workshops with schools will mean that Artistic responses from school children will also be displayed. .

“I’m thrilled to see this project get the funding it deserves.”

Judges’ Lodgings also recently won a £55,000 grant to explore the history of Lancaster’s famous furniture company, Gillows, and the town’s troubled history with slavery. The partnership project will completely redevelop the Gillows Gallery and produce new orders of enslaved Africans on site.

Imogen Tyler, professor of sociology at Lancaster University, says the AIM-funded project will ‘enrich’ public understanding of the Gillows collection and the furniture-making craft that was so integral to Lancaster’s history. in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Professor Tyler said: “This project will bring a new generation of visitors to the Judges’ Lodging Museum by telling new global and human stories about this industry, including the stories of indigenous peoples and enslaved Africans forced to work in the rainforests of the Caribbean felling huge mahogany trees, the sailors who shipped this exotic cargo to Lancaster’s St George’s Quay, and the skilled apprentices and craftsmen employed in the city’s furniture workshops.

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Louisville student named 2022 winner of Derby Museum art competition https://laprairie-shlm.com/louisville-student-named-2022-winner-of-derby-museum-art-competition/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 23:09:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/louisville-student-named-2022-winner-of-derby-museum-art-competition/ A student from Mercy Academy had a big surprise at school this week. Lily Swan was called out of class on Thursday morning to find out she was the grand prize winner of the Derby Museum’s Horsesing Around With Art competition. Swan named his winning piece “The Bath”, which depicts the racehorse “Rock Your World”. […]]]>

A student from Mercy Academy had a big surprise at school this week. Lily Swan was called out of class on Thursday morning to find out she was the grand prize winner of the Derby Museum’s Horsesing Around With Art competition. Swan named his winning piece “The Bath”, which depicts the racehorse “Rock Your World”. The 11th grader was greeted by crowds of people when she received the news, claiming her reward of a dozen red roses and a ‘Spring Race Day Experience’. table on Millionaires Row for a day, a race named after Swan and the opportunity for the 11th grader to present a trophy to the winning horse of his race in the Winner’s Circle.The Mercy’s Art Department Academy will also receive a $500 prize to be used for art supplies. This is the Derby Museum’s 36th Annual Horseing Around With Art competition presented by WinStar. The contest encourages students to show their perspective on The Greatest Two Minutes in Sports. HAWA is open to public, private, or parochial Louisville Metro students in grades 1-12. Any teacher or school representative is eligible to present student work. A total of $6,300 is awarded to the art departments of the winning schools, and the artwork helps students build their college portfolios. Student work will be exhibited in the museum’s Carl F. Pollard Gallery. from January 21 to March 20. Swan’s art will be exhibited next year. For more information, click here.

A Mercy Academy student had a big surprise at school this week.

Lily Swan was called out of class on Thursday morning to find out she was the grand prize winner of the Derby Museum’s Horsesing Around With Art competition.

Swan named his winning piece “The Bath”, which depicts the racehorse “Rock Your World”.

The 11th grader was greeted by crowds of people when she received the news, claiming her reward of a dozen red roses and a ‘spring race day experience’.

This package includes a table on Millionaires Row for one day, a race named after Swan, and the opportunity for the Grade 11 student to present a trophy to the winning horse of their race in the Winner’s Circle.

Mercy Academy’s art department will also receive a $500 prize to be used for art supplies.

This is the Derby Museum’s 36th Annual Horseing Around With Art competition presented by WinStar. The contest encourages students to show their perspective on the best two minutes in sports.

HAWA is open to public, private, or parochial students in Metro Louisville in grades 1-12. Any teacher or school representative is eligible to submit student work.

A total of $6,300 is awarded to the art departments of the winning schools, and the artwork helps students build their college portfolios.

Student work will be on display in the museum’s Carl F. Pollard Gallery from January 21 to March 20.

Swan’s art will be exhibited next year.

For more information, click here.

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Three exhibitions to open at the Hunterdon Art Museum https://laprairie-shlm.com/three-exhibitions-to-open-at-the-hunterdon-art-museum/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 19:59:02 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/three-exhibitions-to-open-at-the-hunterdon-art-museum/ Thea Clark, Meminero, 2019, Seashell, charcoal, pine rosin, silver, beads, acrylic, epoxy resin, paper and ink, thread, 4.5″ x 1.25″ x 1.25″; Photo: Terry Greene Photography Malcolm Mobutu Smith, Making Strides, 2010, Stoneware, slip and glaze. Photo credit: Michael Cavanaugh and Kevin Montague Works on View Explore contemporary issues including climate change, socio-political frictions, burdens […]]]>

Thea Clark, Meminero, 2019, Seashell, charcoal, pine rosin, silver, beads, acrylic, epoxy resin, paper and ink, thread, 4.5″ x 1.25″ x 1.25″; Photo: Terry Greene Photography

Malcolm Mobutu Smith, Making Strides, 2010, Stoneware, slip and glaze. Photo credit: Michael Cavanaugh and Kevin Montague

Works on View Explore contemporary issues including climate change, socio-political frictions, burdens of 21st century society

The Hunterdon Art Museum is pleased to present three new exhibitions which will open on January 23, 2022. The exhibitions include works by artists Thea Clark, Malcolm Mobutu Smith and Nanette Carter

Thea Clark: do/cancel features Thea Clark’s earliest and latest jewelry work spanning a ten-year period on the theme of the conflict between nature and the built environment due to accelerating climate change.

Early work began after Clark, a former NJ resident, experienced hurricanes Irene and Sandy. These two catastrophic weather events in a short period of time left an indelible emotional impact, while the time spent volunteering on Staten Island after Sandy led to powerful scenes of destruction being absorbed.

Clark has been concerned with environmental issues his entire life. Her pendants, brooches and necklaces incorporate household and found objects that often reflect her concerns. Isobar boards, anthracite coal, acoustic tiles and asphalt shingles are some of the materials she has incorporated into the jewelry on display at the Museum.

“I am drawn to materials that evoke a place or a resonance, such as clothing or home textiles, which serve as surrogates for people. Thanks to our actions, found objects are converted into useful objects. When they are thrown away, they have lost all meaning. We remove their uselessness by recognizing their potential when found or discovered. The artifacts found take on new meaning when examined in more detail. Our connection to the planet can be described as ‘Do/Undo’,” says Clark.

She reflects and speculates on the disharmony in relation to the balance between the natural world, humanity and the built environment. In order to personalize the global predicament, she creates art. Thea believes that people must first feel before they can act, and she hopes her art will inspire others to do the same.

Malcolm Mobutu Smith: Always more never moreincludes ceramic works inspired by the concerns, fears and uncertainties of ongoing socio-political frictions. It’s the continuation of a series that began over a decade ago with the inauguration of our nation’s first black president. According to Smith, this accomplishment lifted the thin veil that hid the throbbing and bubbling hatred across our country.

Nanette Carter, Cantilevered #26, 2016, 18″ x 17″, Oil on Mylar, Courtesy of Berry Campbell Gallery, New York

“’Evermore Nevermore’ offers deadpan and sardonic totems as reflections from a past filled with festering hatred to a confused and unrepentant present. Sometimes the work presents a sarcastic specter that hands us despicable representations, like a visual version of nails on a blackboard. Yet, strangely, they can also act as hopeful monuments sparking ideas for change, rather than the not-so-forgotten ugliness still bubbling in the psyche of our culture and its people,” Smith explains.

In this exhibition, “Making Strides”, a two-sided stoneware piece, addresses the two-sided reflection on Western society’s respect and contempt for black people. It appears to be a modern art abstraction based on an African ship from an angle. The other side of this coin reveals the character Little Eight Ball, a 1940s comic book character who is the dehumanized black child meant to be comic relief.

The Roxey Ballet Company and Smith are in the early stages of a potential collaboration, with a live performance inspired by Smith’s work to take place shortly before the show closes in April 2022 on the Museum’s terrace. More information will be available on the Museum’s website as the event takes shape.

“Form Follows Function: The Art of Nanette Carter” features works from two of the artist’s series, “Cantilevered” and “The Weight”. Carter describes herself as a chronicler of our time, taking intangible ideas around contemporary issues and finding a way to present them in an abstract vocabulary of form, line, color and texture.

Carter’s Cantilevered Series adopts an architectural term that refers to horizontal structures supported at only one end. Precariously balanced, they suggest the uncertainty and instability of 21st century lives.

Carter’s series artwork, “The Weight,” pays homage to the mysteries of nature, human nature, and the contemporary burdens we carry in the 21st century.

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Beykoz Museum offers a journey into the glittering past of Turkish glass art https://laprairie-shlm.com/beykoz-museum-offers-a-journey-into-the-glittering-past-of-turkish-glass-art/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 13:13:10 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/beykoz-museum-offers-a-journey-into-the-glittering-past-of-turkish-glass-art/ When one thinks of glass art, places such as Venice and Bohemia come to mind. However, Istanbul, the heart of many traditional arts, has been the center of its own unique style of glassmaking that synthesizes East and West. In the Ottoman Empire, the state paid great attention to the manufacture of glass; glass thus […]]]>

When one thinks of glass art, places such as Venice and Bohemia come to mind. However, Istanbul, the heart of many traditional arts, has been the center of its own unique style of glassmaking that synthesizes East and West. In the Ottoman Empire, the state paid great attention to the manufacture of glass; glass thus gained a significant place among the Ottoman arts. As is the case with palaces and mansions, glamorous glassware has been used in the windows and chandeliers of mosques, the heart of spiritual life. For example, 16 glassblowers worked on the construction of the Süleymaniye Mosque, the masterpiece of the famous Ottoman architect Sinan in Istanbul. French traveler Joseph Pitton de Tournefort, who traveled through Ottoman lands between 1700 and 1702, praised the new Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Blue Mosque) and its pleasant crystal balls, branch chandeliers and ostrich eggs, traditionally used to ward off spiders.

As the “Seyahatname” (“Travel Books”) of Ottoman traveler Evliya Çelebi recounts, glassmakers occupied a distinct place among the artists of old Istanbul. They included masters who made items for use in everyday life as well as artists who made unique items that had artistic value.

Dervish path Mehmed

The art of glass rooted in the Ottoman era would gradually change as the empire moved towards the West. During the reign of the Ottoman Sultan Selim III, who ascended to the throne in 1761, a Mevlevi dervish named Mehmed Dede, who adhered to the Sufism of the Sufi philosopher Mevlana Jalaladdin Rumi, was sent to train in glassmaking in Venice by order of the palace. Dervish Mehmed was among the students sent to Europe by the Ottomans amid interest in developments in the West.


An exterior view of the Beykoz Glass and Crystal Museum, Istanbul.  (Courtesy of the National Palaces)
An exterior view of the Beykoz Glass and Crystal Museum, Istanbul. (Courtesy of the National Palaces)

This artist stayed in Venice for a while and learned how to make opal glass. On his return, he established a glass workshop in Beykoz, then in a village near Istanbul and later in a district of the city. Probably due to his skill in the force of spiritual love in his heart, Mehmed brilliantly shaped his glass and his reputation grew. His glass artwork often resembled Mevlevi caps, reflecting Rumi’s spirituality. Although Sultan Selim III died in a domestic upheaval, he rendered a great service to Turkish glass art.

Beykoz glass in Mecca

During the reign of Sultan Abdülmecid, who ascended to the throne in 1839, a glass factory named Beykoz Cam ve Billurat Fabrika-i Hümayunu (Beykoz Imperial Glass and Crystal Factory) began to operate in the region. It was followed by many glass workshops in Beykoz, to the point that the adjective “Beykoz işi” (work of Beykoz) was born. Glassworks used in Islamic holy places in Mecca were also made in Beykoz. Glassworks similar to “Beykoz işi” have been observed in a large area stretching from Iran to India. Beykoz has become the eponymous name for glass, although its fame has waned nowadays.

Beykoz, with a rich past, currently houses a comprehensive but relatively recent glass museum. The Beykoz and Crystal Museum, inaugurated by the Presidency of the National Palaces in the restored former stables of Abraham Pasha Grove, houses a glittering world behind its doors.

Abraham Pasha’s Grove, which rose to the rank of vizier during the reign of Sultan Abdülaziz, once housed mansions, birdhouses, swimming pools and a theater. During the reign of Sultan Abdülhamid II, this land was purchased and opened to the public under the name of “garden of freedom”. Currently, only the restored stables survive on this 360 decare (89 acres) lot.

1,500 exhibits

The museum is made up of 12 thematic sections which house 1,500 pieces representing all kinds of glassware. In the museum, which contains exhibits from different palaces and museums in Turkey, in particular Topkapı Palace, one can trace the making of glass in Turkish history through sparkling and magnificent examples. These works, dating from the 13th to 19th centuries, reflect the broad cultural codes of Ottoman and Turkish art while revealing its interaction with the West when needed.

700 year old glass plate

The oldest artifact in the Beykoz Glass and Crystal Museum collection is the 700-year-old glass plate found during excavations of the Kubadabad Palace of Alaeddin Keykubad, the ruler of the Seljuk Sultanate of Rum. Also known as the “Kubadabad Plaque”, this work, adorned with enamel and gilding ornaments, is dated between 1237 and 1246.

Another important artifact is the ceremonial coach of Sultan Mahmud II, which is notable for the amount of crystal used in its manufacture.

Almost unscathed Mamluk chandeliers, chandeliers adorned with ancient Turkish calligraphy, colorful and tinted Ottoman artwork known as ‘revzen’, glass objects inherited from Ottoman sultans such as Sultan Abdülhamid II and examples glass from Europe are other distinctive items on display at the museum.

The Beykoz Glass and Crystal Museum is also home to a particularly fun glass workshop for children, in addition to a library that serves as a source for those who want to learn more about glass art.

Resplendent in its natural beauty, the museum is nestled in the hills of Beykoz, appealing to those who want to enjoy a unique cultural atmosphere outside of Istanbul’s most famous historical places.

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Heritage pieces in the Tunceli museum shed light on Anatolian history https://laprairie-shlm.com/heritage-pieces-in-the-tunceli-museum-shed-light-on-anatolian-history/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 13:55:47 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/heritage-pieces-in-the-tunceli-museum-shed-light-on-anatolian-history/ The historical pieces on display at the Tunceli Museum, one of Turkey’s favorite museums, take its visitors on a journey into the past. The museum consists of 4 blocks and 5,800 square meters (6,936 square meters) of indoor space in the eastern province of Tunceli, which is of great importance in terms of tourism with […]]]>

The historical pieces on display at the Tunceli Museum, one of Turkey’s favorite museums, take its visitors on a journey into the past.

The museum consists of 4 blocks and 5,800 square meters (6,936 square meters) of indoor space in the eastern province of Tunceli, which is of great importance in terms of tourism with its unspoiled nature and cultural riches. In addition to sections featuring written and visual displays, it also welcomes visitors with sections including “Alevism”, “archeology”, “library” and “ethnography”. While nearly 2,000 artefacts are on display in the display cases, around 700 artefacts are kept under protection in the museum’s warehouses.

Pieces on display at the Tunceli Museum, Tunceli, eastern Turkey, December 26, 2021. (AA)

Among the most striking works in the museum are the coin collections belonging to the Greek, Roman, Umayyad, Abbasid, Artuqid, Aq Qoyunlu, Rum Seljuk Sultanate and Ottoman periods. About 170 coins, which were collected through donations, purchases or excavations and taken under protection in the museum, feature significant archaeological finds with the numbers engraved on them.

The coins, which are a source of material culture in terms of Tunceli history, give clues to the periods in which they were made through the state coat of arms, the name of the ruler who minted them, their date of issue and the city where they were struck.

At the same time, figures to which Anatolian civilizations attribute symbolic value according to their cultures, mythologies, geography and the events they have experienced stand out on the coins.

Pieces on display at the Tunceli Museum, Tunceli, eastern Turkey, December 26, 2021. (AA)

Pieces on display at the Tunceli Museum, Tunceli, eastern Turkey, December 26, 2021. (AA)

Speaking to Anadolu Agency (AA), Tunceli museum director Kenan ncel said the museum houses artefacts that are thousands of years old. Stating that the pieces on display in the museum are among the important works, ncel said: “We have a wide variety of exhibits of pieces from the Greek period to the Roman, Byzantine, Sassanid, Anatolia, Abbasis, Umayyad, Ilkhanate and Ottoman periods. in our museum. With the invention of money and the discovery of silver by the Lydians, silver was widely used in Anatolia. Coins of a civilization from the Aegean region can be found today in Tunceli, as the coins were used as trade materials. “

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