executive director – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 12:01:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://laprairie-shlm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-2-150x150.png executive director – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ 32 32 Museum Guild brings history downtown https://laprairie-shlm.com/museum-guild-brings-history-downtown/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 09:02:49 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/museum-guild-brings-history-downtown/ ▶️ Listen to this article now. SANDPOINT — The Bonner County Historical Society and Museum has long dreamed of being downtown. However, the expense has put that dream out of reach – until now. Enter the Guild of Museums – part museum, part gift shop, part funky space with special treasures, each with their own […]]]>


▶ Listen to this article now.

SANDPOINT — The Bonner County Historical Society and Museum has long dreamed of being downtown.

However, the expense has put that dream out of reach – until now.

Enter the Guild of Museums – part museum, part gift shop, part funky space with special treasures, each with their own unique story.

The guild is the “culmination” of two long-held dreams of the Bonner County Historical Society, said Heather Upton, executive director of the Bonner County Museum. The first: the museum has been hoping for years for a presence in the city center to promote local history and its exhibitions. Second: Museum officials wanted to create – and showcase – local products and books unique to the region.

“We all have a love for the museum and our community,” Upton said. “And a love for magical vintage and antique items that we all believe have a story and we want to help continue that story for this item.”

Upton met Panida’s new executive director, Veronica Knowles, around the same time retail space became available. It wasn’t long before she said they both realized the space was the perfect place for the museum to achieve both goals.

“The opportunity was irresistible, but we knew operating a downtown retail space would be a big undertaking,” Upton said.

The challenge was how to get there.

A “museum guild” was formed to turn the dream into reality – Josie and Dennis Buckmiller, Hannah Combs, Margot Mazur and Brooke Moore forming the core group – to manage the vision.

“The word guild conjures up the spirit of a group of artisans coming together for a common purpose, which perfectly describes this group,” Upton said.

The group’s combined knowledge, love of history and knowledge of antiques, art and quality products make the Museum Guild shop a special place, she added.

“I really believe the universe helped bring it all together with us,” Upton said.

Equally important to the creation of the Museum Guild is the museum’s board and its many volunteers, Upton said.

“We couldn’t have done it without their help in supporting this mission,” she added. “I’ve had so many people volunteer to work just for a day, they just want to be a part of this…it’s really like you build it, they’d come and the amount of community support has been amazing .”

The Museum Guild gives the museum the opportunity to strengthen its community presence and raise awareness of local history.

Upton said in many ways that the Museum Guild is, in a sense, an appendix to the museum itself, allowing him another space to hold some of the objects from the museum’s extensive collection, which numbers more than a million. ‘objects.

It also has the potential to support the museum’s operating budget even more than some of its signature fundraising events, Upton said.

“But perhaps more importantly, it will also be an educational space that will help tell the story of our community,” she added.

Being able to share these stories, from people at places like the Panida to “the community spirit that has driven our little town for decades,” Upton said, benefits everyone from the museum to the community to visitors.

The Guild Showcase, which faces the intersection of First and Main, gives Upton the opportunity to curate another space to showcase local history. Although the museum has been around since 1978, the museum’s executive director said she still finds many people are unaware of its existence.

The Museum Guild will sell a wide variety of ancient artifacts collected by guild members, as well as Bonner County-specific merchandise created by the museum. Additionally, the gift shop will sell a comprehensive collection of local history books, books by local authors, and playing cards with local historical photos. Botanical sketches and house plans created by local artists will also be featured.

The museum is also working to create new products, drawing inspiration from the museum’s archives, including prints of local maps, historical photos, and prints of old posters from the Panida show. Other branded products, such as a coffee blend created with Evans Brothers Coffee, will also be sold at the Museum Guild.

“Really, it’s all the very unusual items that you can’t find anywhere that are really special and have a story behind them,” Upton said.

Vintage clothing and home accessories will also be on display, as will furniture – such as benches and more – made from historic reclaimed wood. Antique furniture donated to the museum, but lacking sufficient local provenance to be accepted into the museum’s collection, will also be sold to the Museum Guild.

“We have our incredible collection at the museum, but it has a very specific scope,” Upton said. “For something to be accepted into the museum’s collection, it must tell the story of Bonner County.

“A lot of people have a wonderful object that was their great-grandmother’s that is very special to them. They just wanted to go to a good home and they want to support the museum.”

It allows them to do both – the precious object finds a new home to continue its story, and its sale benefits museum operations.

“I think that’s what will be a huge positive thing for the museum as well, because we always feel sad, like having to turn down a really fabulous object, because it just doesn’t have enough provenance to this local community,” Upton said. noted.

Forming a focal point is a poster-sized photo of one of the museum’s more than 70,000 historic photos. The photos have become a popular addition to homes and local businesses – now with the Museum Guild, Upton said the museum will create a catalog of its best photos, separated by subject. This will allow the museum to both showcase its photo collection, but also give interested people a place to browse the photos – and order the ones they like.

The downtown expansion will not mean the end of the gift shop at the museum itself. This gift shop, located at 611 S. Ella Ave., remains open and will primarily carry books published by the Bonner County Historical Society Press and other books by local authors.

Upton said the goal was to staff the Museum Guild with guild members and museum volunteers, much like how the Community Assistance League runs its high-end resale shop, Bizarre Bazaar.

Those interested in volunteering can go online to the museum’s website, bonnercountyhistory.org, and fill out a volunteer form. Those who prefer to do it in person can stop by the museum.

The downtown expansion will not mean the end of the gift shop at the museum itself. This gift shop, located at 611 S. Ella Ave., remains open and will primarily carry books published by the Bonner County Historical Society Press and other books by local authors.

The Museum Guild, located at 300 N. First Ave., will be open Wednesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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Shell Museum Launches New Mangrove Exhibit | News, Sports, Jobs – SANIBEL-CAPTIVA https://laprairie-shlm.com/shell-museum-launches-new-mangrove-exhibit-news-sports-jobs-sanibel-captiva/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 19:41:21 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/shell-museum-launches-new-mangrove-exhibit-news-sports-jobs-sanibel-captiva/ BAILEY MATTHEWS NATIONAL SHELL MUSEUM The Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum launched a new mangrove exhibit earlier this month in its Beyond Shells living gallery. It is designed to facilitate an educational story about mangrove conservation and water quality that will be meaningful to local, visitor and school audiences. Mangroves are tropical […]]]>

BAILEY MATTHEWS NATIONAL SHELL MUSEUM

The Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum launched a new mangrove exhibit earlier this month in its Beyond Shells living gallery. It is designed to facilitate an educational story about mangrove conservation and water quality that will be meaningful to local, visitor and school audiences.

Mangroves are tropical coastal shrubs and trees that can tolerate wave action and immersion in seawater and thrive under a wide range of salt concentrations. Different species of mangroves are adapted to thrive in sand or mud with very low oxygen conditions. The exhibit features a red mangrove, which is usually found at the outer edge of mangrove forests.

“This dynamic new exhibit takes the viewer into a beautifully recreated red mangrove ecosystem, providing an up-close view of the importance of mangroves to the health and conservation of our coastal environments,” said executive director Sam Ankerson.

Mangroves provide shelter and habitat for a diverse community of invertebrates and fish. Molluscs thrive in ecosystems, from the muddy bottom around trees to roots, branches and trunks, and even under the bark of mangrove trees.

The exhibit includes molluscs and fish typical of a red mangrove ecosystem, including swamp killifish, sheepshead killifish, sailfin mollies, bruised nassa snails, conch snails, banded tulips, and true tulips. The mangrove extends over a “visualization bubble” which allows visitors to view the diversity of animals while standing inside the exhibit.

For more information, visit ShellMuseum.org.

The Bailey-Matthews National Seashell Museum is located at 3075 Sanibel Captiva Road, Sanibel.


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Through the Lens Series Returns to Colorado Snowsports Museum in Vail https://laprairie-shlm.com/through-the-lens-series-returns-to-colorado-snowsports-museum-in-vail/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/through-the-lens-series-returns-to-colorado-snowsports-museum-in-vail/ The Colorado Snowsports Musem kicks off its Through the Lens series on Wednesday with 9News’ Matt Renoux talking about the Beijing Olympics. The museum is home to many Olympic artifacts and even features a glimpse of Spyder’s competition uniforms on display.Colorado Snowsports Museum/Courtesy Photo The Colorado Snowsports Museum is bringing back its popular Through the […]]]>

The Colorado Snowsports Musem kicks off its Through the Lens series on Wednesday with 9News’ Matt Renoux talking about the Beijing Olympics. The museum is home to many Olympic artifacts and even features a glimpse of Spyder’s competition uniforms on display.
Colorado Snowsports Museum/Courtesy Photo

The Colorado Snowsports Museum is bringing back its popular Through the Lens series, which gives you an in-depth look at topics surrounding the snow sports industry. Matt Renoux of 9News will give a talk entitled “Who and what to watch in Beijing” on Wednesday at 5:30 p.m.

The Colorado Snowsports Museum provides a perfect backdrop for an Olympics conference due to its large amount of Olympics artifacts.

“One of the most popular items we have is the 1924 Opening Ceremonies jacket. It’s almost 100 years old,” said Jen Mason, executive director of the Colorado Snowsports Museum.



Renoux will guide participants through the vast array of local and regional athletes as well as known stars on the world stage. Renoux has covered six Olympics in person during his career. “And what I would call the ‘half’ of the Olympics. We went to Tokyo in 2019 to get all kinds of stories about culture and other preview topics, but we couldn’t go once the 2020 Olympics were in 2021 in due to COVID-19,” Renoux said.

Like most media, Renoux will not be able to report on the Olympics in person but will still work around the clock to cover the event.



“Between the time change, working in the morning, in the afternoon and the 9News shows in the evening, it’s going to be as busy as if we were there,” Renoux said.

Local watch parties will be more important than ever since fans and family members cannot attend the Winter Games in Beijing.

“Previously, families were all in the stands at the event, but now we’ll try to cover as many watch parties as possible to share reactions from parents, siblings and friends,” Renoux said.

Renoux spent years covering athletes participating in mountain sports, but also met a number of athletes who trained at the US Olympic and Paralympic Training Center in Colorado Springs.

“We’ll talk about mountain town athletes like Red Gerard, Taylor Gold, Mikaela, of course, as well as figure skaters like Mariah Bell, who at 25 will be the oldest American singles skater since the 1928 Olympics. ,” Renoux said.

Come early Wednesday and brush up on Olympic trivia as you visit the all-digital interactive wall that will immerse you in the history of the Olympics. See Billy Kidd’s helmet, Heidi Kloser’s Opening Ceremonies uniform, and the torch that passed through Vail ahead of the 2002 Salt Lake Olympics carried by Vail’s Cindy Nelson.

The Through the Lens series is presented virtually and in person at the Colorado Snowsports Museum, located on the upper level of the Vail Village parking structure. Tickets are $20 for Colorado Snowsports Museum members and $25 for non-members. Events begin at 5:30 p.m. and tickets can be purchased at SnowsportsMuseum.org.

Program:

  • January 26: Beijing Olympics – Who and what to watch in Beijing with Matt Renoux, 9News
  • February 19: Battle of Riva Ridge with Chris Anthony
  • March 2: How it started – Vail Veterans Program with Cheryl Jensen
  • March 16: Alpine Skiing at Bluebird Backcountry with Erik Lambert
  • March 23: Winter sports and wildlife with Rudi Hartmann
  • March 30: Billy Fiske: Air Force in Aspen with Kevin Billings
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Sanibel Captiva Trust Company sponsors “Live from Sanibel” to benefit the Seashell Museum https://laprairie-shlm.com/sanibel-captiva-trust-company-sponsors-live-from-sanibel-to-benefit-the-seashell-museum/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 06:07:13 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/sanibel-captiva-trust-company-sponsors-live-from-sanibel-to-benefit-the-seashell-museum/ Through Staff | to January 20, 2022 From left to right: Jeff Muddell and Al Hanser of the Sanibel Captiva Trust Company; Sam Ankerson of the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum; Robin Cook, Gary Dyer and Steve Greenstein of the Sanibel Captiva Trust Company. COURTESY PHOTO The Sanibel Captiva Trust Company has been a longtime partner […]]]>

From left to right: Jeff Muddell and Al Hanser of the Sanibel Captiva Trust Company; Sam Ankerson of the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum; Robin Cook, Gary Dyer and Steve Greenstein of the Sanibel Captiva Trust Company. COURTESY PHOTO

The Sanibel Captiva Trust Company has been a longtime partner of the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum through its support of various programs and events.

“We are proud to sponsor the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum’s ongoing educational platforms as well as its newly developed adult education classes, online and in-person lecture series, and innovative art and photography exhibits.” , said the founder and founder of the Sanibel Captiva Trust Company. President Al Hanser. “The museum offers residents and visitors a great way to learn about our beautiful islands and appreciate the museum’s outstanding collections and aquariums.”

For the 18th year, the trust company has signed on as the presenting sponsor of the museum’s annual gala, “Live From Sanibel.” Scheduled for Saturday night, February 12, the evening includes dinner and wine, live and silent auctions, and a performance by comedian, actor, and “Saturday Night Live” alum Kevin Nealon. The gala takes place at the Sanibel Community House.

“The Sanibel Captiva Trust Company continues to be a generous and important supporter of the museum,” said Sam Ankerson, executive director of the museum. “Their continued support allows us to expand our reach in our community.”

For tickets or more information on the “Live From Sanibel” Gala, call Margery Vizza at 239-395-2233. ¦

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The Rubin Museum of Art to return two relics from its collection to Nepal https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-rubin-museum-of-art-to-return-two-relics-from-its-collection-to-nepal/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 10:55:19 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-rubin-museum-of-art-to-return-two-relics-from-its-collection-to-nepal/ the Rubin Art Museum in New York announced that he would return two relics from his collection to Nepal after they were found smuggled from two religious sites in the Kathmandu Valley. A memorandum of understanding was signed on Monday by Bishnu Prasad Gautam, acting Nepalese consul general in New York, and Jorrit Britschgi, executive […]]]>

the Rubin Art Museum in New York announced that he would return two relics from his collection to Nepal after they were found smuggled from two religious sites in the Kathmandu Valley.

A memorandum of understanding was signed on Monday by Bishnu Prasad Gautam, acting Nepalese consul general in New York, and Jorrit Britschgi, executive director of the Rubin Museum.

“The Rubin Museum agreed to return the sculptures after identifying them and providing the required proof of their origins,” Gautam told Kantipur, the Post’s sister newspaper.

“Lost Arts of Nepal”, a group working to identify and locate lost Nepal artefacts scattered around the world, in September said he had located the two relics – a Flying Gandharva from the 14th century and another the upper part of a Torana from the 17th centuryat the Rubin Art Museum.

Nepalese heritage recovery campaign had then written to the museum for the return of the objects. The Department of Archeology then provided information to determine the ownership and origin of the works of art.

The museum said in a statement that these two relics were the first items in its collection to have been obtained illegally, the The New York Times reported.

According to museum officials, the Torana was lost from the main gate of Yampi Mahavihara / I-Bahi, Patan, Lalitpur. According to museum officials, the artwork arrived at the museum in 2010. The flying Apsara artwork is from Keshchandra Mahavihara, Itum Bahal, Kathmandu, which was lost in 1999 and added to the museum’s collection. in 2003.

According to a statement released by the Nepalese Consulate General in New York, Britschgi, upon signing the MoU, said: “As custodians of the art of our collection, the Rubin recognizes that we have an ongoing duty to carefully research the art and objects we collect and let’s exhibit. “

“The theft of archaeological objects continues to be a major concern in the art world. Rubin’s collection activities adhere to the highest standards of ethical and professional practice related to provenance, ”said Britschgi. “We believe it is our responsibility to address and resolve cultural property issues, including helping to facilitate the return of the two objects in question.”

Gautam, for his part, expressed his gratitude to the Rubin Museum.

“Rubin’s proactive and warm response and thoughtful collaboration have positively contributed to Nepal’s national efforts to recover and restore lost artifacts,” Gautam said. “I expressed my deep gratitude to the Rubin Museum, its Executive Director, Board of Trustees, academics and museum officials for their initiative and cooperation in returning these artefacts to Nepal.”

Gautam also appreciated the support received from the media, civil society and others in the business, the statement said.

The Nepalese Consulate General in New York and the Rubin Museum have expressed their willingness to work closely together to promote art and culture, including Himalayan art, saying these collaborative efforts contribute to the preservation cultural heritage and further strengthen the long-standing people. -the relations between Nepal and the United States of America.

“The Consulate General continues to work on the country’s national efforts in repatriating lost cultural property,” the statement read.

In December, government officials returned a sculpture depicting the Hindu goddess Lakshmi-Narayan on the pedestal of her temple in Patan after the Dallas Museum of Art returned it.

Gautam called the signing of the agreement a new step in the recovery of lost artifacts.

“The Rubin Museum of Art has agreed to cover the cost of transporting the relics to Nepal,” Gautam said. “These two relics have already been removed from the exhibits. “

According to Gautam, the two relics are expected to arrive in Nepal during the third week of May.

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Sidney Museum to host popular LEGO exhibit from January 2 – Saanich News https://laprairie-shlm.com/sidney-museum-to-host-popular-lego-exhibit-from-january-2-saanich-news/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/sidney-museum-to-host-popular-lego-exhibit-from-january-2-saanich-news/ A popular exhibition returns to the Sidney Museum. The 2022 edition of the annual LEGO exhibit will open on January 2, through March 31, with scheduled entry to be reserved on the museum’s website. The exhibition, back in its 16th year, features hundreds of LEGO building models. It all started when the museum’s former executive […]]]>

A popular exhibition returns to the Sidney Museum.

The 2022 edition of the annual LEGO exhibit will open on January 2, through March 31, with scheduled entry to be reserved on the museum’s website.

The exhibition, back in its 16th year, features hundreds of LEGO building models. It all started when the museum’s former executive director, Peter Garnham, displayed sets that he and his two sons, Jason and David, had built over the years.

In the past, before the COVID-19 pandemic, the exhibit attracted well over 10,000 people.

The 2021 edition of the event, which lasted five months, drew nearly 3,600 guests, according to the 2021 annual report of the Sidney Museum and Archives Society. The museum has also created videos on Facebook Live to give viewers a more in-depth look at some of the LEGO sets on display.

Overall, the effects of COVID-19 weigh heavily on the museum’s recent activities, as described in the annual report.

“While reaching its highest number of visits in a single month on record in February 2020 at 5,263, the Sidney Museum also experienced a six-month record low due to COVID-19,” it read. “The Sidney Museum is also experiencing its lowest number of annual visitors since the early 2000s (less than 5,000) and currently stands at 3,996 as of (September 31) 2021.”

These numbers need context as the museum closed for renovation between June 1 and September 1, giving staff and volunteers time to tackle several projects.

The renovations included refurbishing the floor, changing workspace and creating additional storage rooms. The museum also installed new technology to complete a multi-year project to upgrade network cabling, security cameras and the security computer terminal.

Financially, the museum was able to increase non-municipal support with earned income equivalent to 80 percent of contributed income.


Do you have a story tip? Email: vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca.

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wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com

Saanich Peninsula Sidney

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Catawba College Business Students Check NC Museum Of Dolls, Toys & Miniatures – Salisbury Post https://laprairie-shlm.com/catawba-college-business-students-check-nc-museum-of-dolls-toys-miniatures-salisbury-post/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 05:12:10 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/catawba-college-business-students-check-nc-museum-of-dolls-toys-miniatures-salisbury-post/ During the fall semester, the NC Museum of Dolls, Toys & Miniatures collaborated with three different classes at the Ralph W. Ketner School of Business at Catawba College – Introduction to Entrepreneurship, Marketing Research, and Course Marketing Management. MBA, courses taught by Dr Jeremiah Nelson and Dr Jennifer Yurchisin. “The students had so many great […]]]>

During the fall semester, the NC Museum of Dolls, Toys & Miniatures collaborated with three different classes at the Ralph W. Ketner School of Business at Catawba College – Introduction to Entrepreneurship, Marketing Research, and Course Marketing Management. MBA, courses taught by Dr Jeremiah Nelson and Dr Jennifer Yurchisin.

“The students had so many great ideas,” said Beth Nance, executive director of the museum, following the business plan presentations at the end of the semester in Nelson’s introduction to entrepreneurship.

Located in Spencer, the museum offers visitors exhibits ranging from antique dolls and toys to contemporary childhood favorites. After visiting the museum at the start of the semester, the students noticed that the museum really has something for everyone, not just keen collectors or little kids. There is clearly a lot of untapped potential to expand audiences to increase visitor traffic.

Groups of students highlighted combinations of operational tactics, partnership ideas, and marketing strategies that they believed would positively impact the visitor experience or generate new interest in visitors. One team suggested “pop-up” exhibits in stores, community centers and even other museums to raise awareness at no cost to potentially a very specific audience. Several groups highlighted the opportunities of social media advertising as it is very economical and can be highly targeted depending on demographics. Additionally, the potential for free engagement with different groups using hashtags would help raise awareness among niche enthusiasts. One student pointed out that many Tiktok posts with #thumbnails have over a million views.

The entrepreneurship students were really excited about the project. McKenzie Webster, a junior specializing in biology, found developing the business plan an exciting challenge. She explained that “trying to find a way for the museum to improve without losing its character was the top priority of my group”. Marko Sudar, a first year computer science student, agreed. He observed, “It was a really exciting trip and my group was really happy to be a part of it. Finding what is special about the museum and exploring the ways it can stand out among museums and other entertainment options challenged us to apply what we have learned in the classroom.

“I think working with a real client and having the opportunity to develop a business plan for a real company has been a unique and overall amazing experience,” said Harmony Speer, second year student at Catawba College majoring in business administration and sociology. “We took what we learned in the classroom and applied it to a real-life situation at the time. This experience was one of a kind and a great learning experience that went well with the topics covered in class.

In Yurchisin’s Marketing Management course, students identified target markets and performed a SWOT analysis of the museum, developing a list of suggested promotional materials and activities. In their undergraduate marketing research course, a group of students completed a demographic and psychographic profile of museum visitors.

Dr Eric Hake, Dean of the Ketner School of Business, said: “Each semester, professors at the Ralph W. Ketner School of Business collaborate with local businesses to coordinate classroom research to meet the needs of our students. and our community. Project-based learning is an important complement to individualized company internships, both of which integrate classroom theory with practical applications.

To explore ways you can work with business students and faculty at Catawba College, contact Dr. Eric Hake at erhake@catawba.edu.

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Protest is personal in Joshua Rashaad McFadden’s Eastman Museum Art Exhibition | Art https://laprairie-shlm.com/protest-is-personal-in-joshua-rashaad-mcfaddens-eastman-museum-art-exhibition-art/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 16:41:15 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/protest-is-personal-in-joshua-rashaad-mcfaddens-eastman-museum-art-exhibition-art/ As a photographer and curator, it is rare that an art exhibition makes me cry. But that’s exactly what happened with “Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On,” a retrospective photography exhibition at the George Eastman Museum. The dark walls and subdued lights of the gallery space attracted me. At the entrance to the […]]]>

As a photographer and curator, it is rare that an art exhibition makes me cry. But that’s exactly what happened with “Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On,” a retrospective photography exhibition at the George Eastman Museum.

The dark walls and subdued lights of the gallery space attracted me. At the entrance to the exhibition is a mirror with the words “BE REAL BLACK FOR ME”.

This imperative served two purposes: to welcome black spectators to a museum that caters to predominantly white artists for predominantly white audiences, and to challenge white spectators to change their mindset. It was a daring, even radical, statement affirming the right presence of black art in a museum setting.

It’s also rare for an artist as young as Joshua Rashaad McFadden – he’s only 31 – to receive a retrospective so early in his career at a gallery like the George Eastman Museum, which tends to recognize artists with portfolios. more extensive.

Click to enlarge

  • PHOTO BY ERICH CAMPING
  • Joshua Rashaad McFadden mingles with attendees from the George Eastman Museum at the opening reception for the photo retrospective “Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On”.

“Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On” is a stunning look at one of contemporary photography’s most provocative black artists, who also happens to be a native of Rochester. The exhibit is on view at the Eastman Museum until June 19.

I started following McFadden’s work during the 2020 social uprising in Rochester following the murder of Daniel Prude. I was obsessively refreshing social media pages, watching pictures and videos of friends and family in the Rochester Police Department tear gas and pepperball assault. McFadden was on the front lines, documenting interactions between protesters and police with live video clips and photographs, and capturing both the astonishing violence and the uplifting response from the community.

“I had to go and document this no matter what,” McFadden said. “I had to do it.”

Click to enlarge
"Irony of Black Policeman (Atlanta, Georgia), 2020, from "Troubles in America: Rayshard Brooks." - PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN

  • PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN
  • “Irony of Black Policeman (Atlanta, GA), 2020, from” Unrest in America: Rayshard Brooks “.

McFadden has a lot on his plate, creatively. He had already started teaching at RIT when he began documenting the protests in Rochester. He also covered similar protests in Minneapolis, Atlanta and Washington, DC.

“With this kind of work, no, there is no sleep,” he explained. “The protests took place all day and in the middle of the night until 4 am. So, (I) slept two hours a night all summer, really until this year, because Derek Chauvin’s trial happened this year in April.

“He worked without sleep for a long, long, long time. But the job had to be done.

In the protest photography genre, McFadden’s work often captures the unfiltered emotional responses of protesters.

For McFadden, capturing black grief is only a small part of capturing black life. He considers his projects individually, but admits that because the works sometimes overlap, the images and their stories begin to inform.

Click to enlarge
"I relate directly to the plight of black Americans who experience racism in this country," McFadden said. "And so, going out and documenting it was very difficult.  And you will see the intense emotion of the photograph." - PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN

  • PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN
  • “I am directly linked to the plight of black Americans who experience racism in this country,” McFadden said. “And so, going out and documenting that was very difficult. And you will see the intense emotion of the photograph.”

McFadden returned to Rochester in 2018 after several years in Atlanta, where he taught photography at Spelman College, to accept an art residency at the Visual Studies Workshop. He currently teaches at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

From there, he produced “Evidence,” an exhibition that illustrates the breadth of black masculinity and gender through portraits of men alongside those of their fathers or father figures. At the same time, McFadden was motivated by the recent death of his grandfather and produced “Love Without Justice,” an autobiographical photo series that used photos from his family’s archives.

Click to enlarge
PHOTO BY ERICH CAMPING

In his portraits of other people, there is a rawness and a desire for deep self-exploration. “I think the job is really me,” he said. “And it’s not really too glamorous or staged. Especially with the archives, it’s very personal. Especially in ‘Love without justice’. I just add to the archive. So I think it’s me, for sure. Completely unfiltered.

McFadden says his personal experience also motivates his photojournalism work.

“Along with other things, like ‘Unrest in America’, and documenting protests across the country, it’s also very personal. I’m directly linked to the plight of black Americans who experience racism in this country,” a- he said. “And so, going out and documenting it was very difficult. And you will see the intense emotion of the photograph. And it is not only because it is a touching moment, but you will see my emotion. in these photographs.

Click to enlarge
"I can't breathe: Minneapolis, Minnesota," 2020, from "Troubles in America: George Floyd." - PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN

  • PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN
  • “I Can’t Breathe: Minneapolis, Minnesota,” 2020, from “Unrest in America: George Floyd”.

Exploring the self through the chronicle of black life more broadly has been a constant theme of McFadden’s career.

“It always comes down to this constant referencing image map of itself,” said K. Anthony Jones, art critic and McFadden collaborator. “It becomes self-referential throughout this whole loop. “

“He’s exploring what it means not to have a home in this place,” Jones later said.

Eastman Museum executive director Bruce Barnes acknowledged this in his remarks at the opening of “I Believe I’ll Run On,” saying the exhibit “chronicles the intimacy of black life in the United States. And was “a testament to healing and the protective possibilities of turning in on oneself.”

McFadden wanted his work to elicit a visceral response, the kind of real response that, as he put it, was “unfiltered by the institution in which it exists.”

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PHOTO BY JASON MILTON

Museums are spaces for ritual practice, housing objects and artefacts revered by the community that supports them. McFadden’s exhibition plays on this, with lighting and colors that incite an almost holy exaltation of the work. Watching exhibit attendees engage in different ways reminded me of the difference between going to church in New York City with my white mother and going to church in South Carolina with my black father: solemn silence versus jubilant reverence.

It is rare that we are able to gift their flowers to artists while they are still in business and even more exceptional when we are able to do so near the start of what appears to be on the way to a meteoric career.

“This is just the start,” McFadden said. “I have so much more work to do and so much more to say.”

Amanda Chestnut is a freelance writer for CITY. Comments on this article can be directed to dkushner@rochester-citynews.com.

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Phillip K. Smith III Wins 2022 Honor at Palm Springs Art Museum Art Party https://laprairie-shlm.com/phillip-k-smith-iii-wins-2022-honor-at-palm-springs-art-museum-art-party/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/phillip-k-smith-iii-wins-2022-honor-at-palm-springs-art-museum-art-party/ The roots of Lightworks go back to Opening, his first light-based installation, premiered in 2010 while he was the artist in residence at the Palm Springs Art Museum. “Much of my early work dealt directly with light and shadow, often working in monochromatic fashion,” says Smith. “It was only after Opening that I really took […]]]>

The roots of Lightworks go back to Opening, his first light-based installation, premiered in 2010 while he was the artist in residence at the Palm Springs Art Museum. “Much of my early work dealt directly with light and shadow, often working in monochromatic fashion,” says Smith. “It was only after Opening that I really took the color straight away.

Opening and a mirror-polished stainless steel sculpture he created for a site in Oklahoma City signaled the coming of Smith’s seminal work, Lucid stability, which would make his High Desert property a social media sensation.

This magical moment

In 2013, Smith, who is married to Modernism Week executive director Lisa Vossler Smith, decided to “do something” with his High Desert cabin. In the studio, he began experimenting with photographs of the dilapidated structure and creating the first renderings of what would become Lucid stability. “I believe in the brewing process,” he says. “I haven’t drawn on this thing for eight years, and then one day it was like, boom, It was there.

Lucid stability has come to life as an ephemeral monument in the light of the desert – a weathered wooden shelter with polished mirrors replacing the door, windows and any other horizontal beams to reflect the surrounding landscape by day and to project fields of color at night.

“These are four ideas: light and shadow (the interaction with the sun), reflected light, projected light and change,” says Smith, his head buzzing showing a hint of gray. “It varies considerably from sunrise to 9:00 am, noon, 3:00 pm, dusk and into the late evening. At dusk, there is the reflection of the sun inside as the windows and door slowly move through the LED-powered color wheel. The projected light comes from inside and reveals the structure – the two-by-fours, the diagonal bracing – like lines of light that wrap around the cabin. The four windows and the door, you are not fully aware that they are changing. It’s about slowing down, stopping, and being quiet so you can see and listen.

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Matthew Rolston at the Laguna Art Museum – Art and Cake https://laprairie-shlm.com/matthew-rolston-at-the-laguna-art-museum-art-and-cake/ Tue, 24 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/matthew-rolston-at-the-laguna-art-museum-art-and-cake/ Matthew Rolston, Barye, Roger and Angelica (Roger), 2016 (Courtesy of Fahey / Klein, Los Angeles). Matthew Rolston, Art People: The Pageant Portraits Laguna Art Museum, Laguna Beach until September 19, 2021 Written by Liz Goldner If art is a metaphor for life, this photographic exhibition is an exploration of the creative energy of humanity, as […]]]>
Matthew Rolston, Barye, Roger and Angelica (Roger), 2016 (Courtesy of Fahey / Klein, Los Angeles).

Matthew Rolston, Art People: The Pageant Portraits

Laguna Art Museum, Laguna Beach

until September 19, 2021

Written by Liz Goldner

If art is a metaphor for life, this photographic exhibition is an exploration of the creative energy of humanity, as well as the search for meaning and identity. Or as Nigel Spivey, a classic scholar, explains in this exhibit’s catalog, “’Art People’ makes a statement about our identity as human beings: how we define ourselves as creative creatures and as people. ‘individuals whose individuality is part of this creativity. Powerful.”

Inspired by this truism, “Matthew Rolston, Art People: The Pageant Portraits” takes a multi-faceted approach to photography – with his portraits of people, made up and dressed to resemble characters in paintings and sculptures; they are actually characters from Laguna Beach’s theatrical event, Pageant of the Masters, which features the centuries-old art form known as ‘living images’.

The 1932 outdoor pageant, shown for eight weeks each summer, features volunteer cast members wearing detailed makeup and costumes, posing in elaborate painted settings with creative lighting. The resulting tableaux vivants or “living images” depict works of art over the centuries, from those of old masters to contemporary artists.

While living images are appropriate for actual works of art, some of that art is based on photos, as with David Hockney’s painting, “American Collectors,” or on created scenes populated by actual people who pass themselves off as historical figures. An example of a painting that would have been constructed from a posed scene is “The Last Supper” by Leonardo da Vinci. This historic painting was the last living tableau in the historical reenactment for many decades.

“Art People” was created by Rolston, a visionary artist, photographer and filmmaker, who admired the Pageant of the Masters since he was a child. Building on his decades of fascination with the event, he set out five years ago to do individual portraits of the contest’s cast members, while they were not posing for the actual live footage. Malcolm Warner, former executive director of the Laguna Art Museum, explains this process in the catalog: “By isolating his subjects and presenting them in such high definition that the brush and painted patinas reveal themselves as the makeup that they are, Rolston brings the eerie and melancholy poetry of real people posing as painted and sculpted people.

The resulting photographic portraits explore the humanity within us, as well as the deeper vicissitudes of works of art, including the “hall of mirrors” aspects of artistic creation. Some of Rolston’s photos were then based on figures of living images from Pageant, themselves based on paintings and sculptures, themselves derived from photos or staged scenes.

His “Da Vinci, The Last Supper (Saint Philip The Curious)”, depicting the character of Saint Philip from Da Vinci’s “The Last Supper”, is a portrait of a pageant actor, heavily made up, hair and dress to mimic a person of the time of Christ. Depicting a man with a somber expression, it eclipses the present, leading the viewer to a solemn scene from millennia ago.

Rolston’s “Barye, Roger and Angelica”, adorning the cover of the catalog and serving as the hallmark of the show, depicts a young woman painted entirely in gold, including her draped dress and hair, with only her piercing blue eyes revealing her. living identity. She is a human being, on the way to becoming a sculptural work, thus reversing the myth of Pygmalion.

Most of the other portraits in this exhibit are figures from classical historical paintings and sculptures. Yet Rolston’s “Hockney, American Collectors (Marcia Weisman)” is a contemporary portrayal of a Pageant actor posing as the late art collector, Marcia Weisman. Hockney’s original 1968 painting, “American Collectors,” in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago, was created from a photo of Weisman and her husband Frederick Weisman posing next to their house. The Pageant model in this photo takes Weisman to a more humanistic level than that displayed in Hockney’s original painting.

Marcia Simon Weisman (1918-1991) and her husband were major art collectors in Los Angeles. Their spectacular collection of modern and contemporary art, which formed the basis of the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation, is open to the public by reservation only.

Rolston wrote for the “Art People” catalog, “Art is human. We are art. Indeed, this astonishing exhibition, elevating portrait photography to a deep and humanistic level, explores the connection where people transcend their limits to create great art.

Laguna Art Museum

307 Cliff Drive, Laguna Beach, California 92651

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