high school – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 04:01:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://laprairie-shlm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-2-150x150.png high school – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ 32 32 Pa. Veterans Museum Hosts Luncheon for VFW Auxiliary State Officers – Delco Times https://laprairie-shlm.com/pa-veterans-museum-hosts-luncheon-for-vfw-auxiliary-state-officers-delco-times/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 02:24:04 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/pa-veterans-museum-hosts-luncheon-for-vfw-auxiliary-state-officers-delco-times/ MEDIA – The Pennsylvania Veterans Museum recently hosted VFW Auxiliary State Chair Pam Sopher, along with members of VFW Post 3460 In Media and VFW Post 928 in Folsom. About 25 auxiliary members were treated to a champagne lunch and a tour of the museum. The State President, from Titusville, Pennsylvania, travels the state visiting […]]]>

MEDIA – The Pennsylvania Veterans Museum recently hosted VFW Auxiliary State Chair Pam Sopher, along with members of VFW Post 3460 In Media and VFW Post 928 in Folsom. About 25 auxiliary members were treated to a champagne lunch and a tour of the museum. The State President, from Titusville, Pennsylvania, travels the state visiting various VFW posts and was thrilled to visit the Veterans Museum. Sandy Wilder, the state’s auxiliary chief of staff, accompanied Pam Sopher.

In addition to Auxiliary Members, the luncheon was attended by Jim King, Museum President, Bill Lovejoy, Vice President, Ed Buffman, Co-Founder and President Emeritus, and Jolene Buffman, Museum Trustee.

“We love that the auxiliary members of the VFW visit the museum every year and meet their new officers. Our mission is to honor all veterans,” said Buffman, who is a Navy veteran, having served on the USS Missouri in the Pacific during World War II.

The Pennsylvania Veterans Museum contains a large collection of artifacts and memorabilia from WWII in Vietnam, as well as interactive kiosks featuring powerful stories from area veterans.

The Pennsylvania Veterans Museum is located at 12 E. State St., Media, on the lower level of the historic Media Armory. The museum is open on Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Free entry. For more information, call 610-566-0788.

Krueger Announces Grant to Improve Nether Providence Township Park

State Representative Leanne Krueger, D-161 of Nether Providence, recently announced that the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development has awarded Nether Providence $148,600 to make improvements to Hepford Park.

The funding will be used to build a new playground and dugouts for the baseball diamonds, redesign the parking lot, repair and repaint fences, improve concession stands, shade trees and display signage.

The American Legion is hosting a bingo with designer bags

The Ladies Auxiliary of American Legion Post 507, 20 W. Cleveland Ave., Norwood, will host Designer Bag Bingo, 7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 22. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. The evening will include bingo, door prizes, 50/50, raffle baskets, cash bar and BYO snacks. Tickets are $25 in advance for ten bingo games and $30 at the door. Groups of eight or more can reserve a table. For tickets, call Charity Walsh at 610-848-8499.

COSA offers the Arthritis Foundation’s “Walk with Ease” program

The Delaware County Office of Services for the Aging, in partnership with Wayne Senior Center, will sponsor the Arthritis Foundation’s nationally recognized Walk with Ease program beginning at 10:30 a.m. Friday, April 1, for people 60+ who need arthritis pain relief. or just stay active.

The online program will last six weeks. The last session will take place on Friday, May 13. Participants will receive the Arthritis Foundation’s Walk with Ease guide and walk independently three times a week with the assistance of a facilitator in this self-directed version of the program. Participants will share and receive support from a leader and other walkers in weekly online group meetings. In addition, participants will receive information and support guidelines via weekly emails.

This evidence-based program has been shown to reduce arthritis pain, increase balance, strength, and walking pace, build confidence in one’s ability to be physically active, and improve overall health.
The costs of the program are covered by COSA, so the program is free. However, class size is limited. Registration is mandatory.

To register, contact Ellen Williams at williamse@co.delaware.pa.us or 610-499-1937. When you call or email, include your name, address, phone number, and email address.

Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital Hosts Open House at New Women’s Health Center

Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital invites members of the community to an open house at its newly renovated Women’s Health Center from 2-5:30 p.m. on Monday, March 21. A blessing ceremony for the center will take place at 2 p.m.

Specialist providers in the fields of gynecology, plastic and reconstructive surgery, and breast surgery will be on hand at the open house to discuss treatment options and answer questions about available services for women and men.

The new health center is located in the Medical Office Building at 1501 Lansdowne Avenue, Suite 302 in Darby. The fully renovated 3,200 square foot space includes 10 patient exam rooms and serves as a specialty central suite for providers to collaborate on patient care.

Open house attendees will have the opportunity to meet James Cosgrove, DO, an experienced OB/GYN who specializes in minimally invasive robotic gynecological surgery; Karen Kish, MD, a skilled breast surgeon who provides breast health care to women and men; John Fernandez, MD, board-certified plastic and reconstructive surgeon specializing in microsurgery and the treatment of lymphedema; Nathaniel Holzman, MD, board-certified plastic surgeon specializing in breast surgery, body contouring, and cosmetic and reconstructive surgery; and the center’s staff nurse practitioners who play a critical role in patient care.
Attendees will also have the opportunity to tour areas of Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital related to coordinated care available at the new Women’s Center, which feature the latest in mammography technology, which can help detect breast cancer early, when it’s easier to treat, and Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning technology to help better diagnose and treat low bone density and prevent serious fractures.

To learn more about Women’s Health Services at Mercy Fitzgerald, visit https://www.trinityhealthma.org/womens-care-at-mercy-fitzgerald.

Catholic Social Services greet Afghan evacuees at a local lunch

The Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will host a welcome luncheon for newly arrived individuals and families as part of their Afghanistan Placement and Assistance Program from 1-3 p.m., Saturday, March 19, at St. John Chrysostom Parish, 617 S. Providence Rd., Wallingford.

About 125 guests will attend, including about 75 Afghan evacuees as well as program supporters, staff and volunteers. Highlights of the event will include traditional Afghan and Mediterranean dishes, American and Afghan music, a poetry reading and testimonials from participants of CSS’s Afghanistan Placement and Assistance Program. Reverend Edward Hallinan, pastor of St. John Chrysostom Parish, will offer the invocation and blessing. The Reverend Christopher Walsh, pastor of St. Raymond de Peñafort Parish in Philadelphia, will be the emcee for the event.

Since December 2021, CSS has hosted a total of 108 Afghan evacuees under its Afghan Placement and Assistance Program. This number includes 14 Afghan families, a mother with newborn twins and an expectant mother.

Through a partnership with the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, CSS helps Afghan evacuees acclimatize and establish a new life in the United States of America by providing pre-arrival and reception services ; support for basic needs; cultural orientation; language services; finding safe accommodation; use; Health care; and case management services. The CSS also collaborates with local and national agencies such as HIAS and the Nationalities Services Center who have extensive experience in humanitarian aid and assistance to refugees and immigrants.

For more information on Catholic Social Services in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, visit https://cssphiladelphia.org.

A Beef and Beer fundraiser is planned to support the Ridley Lacrosse team

The Ridley High School Men’s Lacrosse Boosters will be hosting a Beef n’ Beer fundraiser, 7-11 p.m., Saturday, March 26, at the Milmont Inn, 300 Belmont Ave., in support of the Ridley High School Men’s Lacrosse Team . Cost is $40 and includes bottled beer, wine, mixed drinks, food, raffle baskets, 50/50 raffle and music from a DJ. To purchase a ticket, Venmo @RidleyLaxBoosters or request a ticket via email at Ridleyboyslax@gmail.com.

Readers can email community news and photos to Peg DeGrassa at pdegrassa@21st-centurymedia.com.

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Downtown LA Museum of Social Justice has a new exhibit featuring photos of deported veterans https://laprairie-shlm.com/downtown-la-museum-of-social-justice-has-a-new-exhibit-featuring-photos-of-deported-veterans/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 01:16:16 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/downtown-la-museum-of-social-justice-has-a-new-exhibit-featuring-photos-of-deported-veterans/ Documentary photographer Joseph Silva has spent six years documenting people he calls family. “We have the same history. So we can talk about similar things that we did in the army or out of the army,” Silva said. His new exhibition titled “Deported Veterans” exemplifies just that. He gets to know the veterans who were […]]]>
Documentary photographer Joseph Silva has spent six years documenting people he calls family.

“We have the same history. So we can talk about similar things that we did in the army or out of the army,” Silva said.

His new exhibition titled “Deported Veterans” exemplifies just that. He gets to know the veterans who were deported and then asks to take their picture.

Silva is a veteran himself.

“I joined the Navy right out of high school because I wanted to see the world,” Silva said.

According to Silva, every year 5,000 new immigrants join the US military.

“People automatically assume you have to be a US citizen, to be a veteran, that’s not true, you can be a green card holder and join the US military.”

He hopes this exhibit can help people understand that these men and women who put their lives on the line for our county call the United States home. Yet they often don’t stay here long after serving.

“These are men and women who served in the United States military. And with this little crime or this little glitch in the system, they were ignored. They were kicked out,” Silva said.

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Out & About: the weekend kicks off with the Art After Hours at the Westmoreland Museum https://laprairie-shlm.com/out-about-the-weekend-kicks-off-with-the-art-after-hours-at-the-westmoreland-museum/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 12:01:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/out-about-the-weekend-kicks-off-with-the-art-after-hours-at-the-westmoreland-museum/ The Westmoreland Museum of American Art stayed open late Friday for Art After Hoursa happy hour style event that offered a little something for a variety of tastes and interests. Pittsburgh Fiber Artist Tina Williams Brewer was on hand to talk with guests about her artistic process and the storytelling quilts featured in her exhibit, […]]]>

The Westmoreland Museum of American Art stayed open late Friday for Art After Hoursa happy hour style event that offered a little something for a variety of tastes and interests.

Pittsburgh Fiber Artist Tina Williams Brewer was on hand to talk with guests about her artistic process and the storytelling quilts featured in her exhibit, “Culture: career path”, a career retrospective until April 24.

Art lovers with a sleuthing bent could go on an art scavenger hunt, finding a series of tiny vignettes contained in artworks on display throughout the Greensburg Museum.

Music lovers will be able to listen to the repertoire of easy-to-listen songs of the Greensburg musical duo, Laurie Fox and Eric Schaus.

Shirley McMarlin | Tribune-Review

Eric Schaus and Laurie Fox, both of Greensburg, provided music for the February 25 Art After Hours event at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg.

For those who needed a bite to eat, a cold drink and some relaxation at the end of the work week, there was socializing in the community room.

P.J. Colligan and jessica Volochboth from Greensburg, were exploring the facility for another reason — they’re planning their October Halloween-themed wedding reception there.

The site has special meaning for the couple. They knew each other when they were students at Hempfield Area High School. They reconnected years later through mutual friends, with band parties including the Art on Tap happy hours which was the predecessor to Art After Hours.

Pat Maloney and Linda Hammers, also from Greensburg, were among those working on the treasure hunt. The exercise tested their powers of observation, Maloney said, but also “makes you really look at the art and appreciate it.”

If hunters couldn’t locate any of the objects, he added, museum workers and other attendees were willing to share clues.

Those who found all of the artwork featured were listed in a drawing for the book, “Picture America: Signature Works From the Westmoreland Museum of American Art,” by the museum’s chief curator, Barbara L. Jones.

4788979_web1_gtr-oa-afterhours4-022722

Shirley McMarlin | Tribune-Review

Greensburg’s PJ Colligan and Jessica Voloch, seen at the Feb. 25 Art After Hours event at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg, are planning their October wedding reception at the museum.

Seen after hours: Keith and Shirleah Kelly, Marcia Dolan, Wendy Hager, Chuck Bowman, Barbara Ferrier, Greg Murman, Jackie Tumulty, Linda Damico, Brandi Slider, Julie Greathouse, Andrew Barnette, Brynn Denny and Brittany Sines, Georges and Cindy McFarland, Jim and Jackie Willkomm, Rowan and Marie Reid, Matt and Demetra Czegan, Pat Parsons and museum staff Rhonda Madden and Doug Evans.

Shirley McMarlin is editor of Tribune-Review. You can contact Shirley at 724-836-5750, smcmarlin@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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Chess returns to the Café Museum in Vienna https://laprairie-shlm.com/chess-returns-to-the-cafe-museum-in-vienna/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 13:05:51 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/chess-returns-to-the-cafe-museum-in-vienna/ A revisited meeting place Vienna’s cafes and chess have a volatile history filled with anecdotes. Their best days are over and you can read more about them in Michael Ehn’s books. The Café Museum opened in 1899 and was regularly visited by Egon Schiele, Gustav Klimt and Oskar Kokoschka. Chess did not enter the scene […]]]>

A revisited meeting place

Vienna’s cafes and chess have a volatile history filled with anecdotes. Their best days are over and you can read more about them in Michael Ehn’s books.

The Café Museum opened in 1899 and was regularly visited by Egon Schiele, Gustav Klimt and Oskar Kokoschka. Chess did not enter the scene until much later, around 1970. At that time, chess players still met at Café Laudon. But when the Laudon was transformed into an Asian restaurant in 1985, it was the turn of the Café Musée, located on Karlsplatzand the hall of mirrors (Spiegelzimmer) has become the refuge of chess addicts.

At that time, the cafe was the office of photographer Erich Reismann, as he retrospectively calls it. He couldn’t bear to stay in his room and didn’t have a phone. In addition, the cafe was closer to the newsrooms he worked for. He had learned chess in high school. His school had a chess club, for whose team he had played in the Viennese league for a few years. So when the chess boom started, Reismann gambled his coffee money in games for the usual five or ten shillings. When tourists appeared who thought they had mastered the game, the professionals knew how to raise the stakes many times over.

The kings of the chess room were Khaled Mahdy – known as Kaletto – and Reini Lendwai. Some guests were only known by their cafe name. For example, “Gerold, a heavyweight”, who was actually a thin man, or “the engineer”, who was once so upset by his defeats that he left the cafe, leaving his collie behind. Since no one knew the engineer’s real name, let alone his home address, a server took care of the animal until further notice.

If a woman wandered into the smoky chess room, which usually only happened once every few weeks, one of the regulars muttered, “I don’t need a doll, I need some potato soup” (a rhyming phrase in the original “I brauch ka Puppn, I brauch Kartoffelsuppn“). There was little consumption, and the waiters let it pass, as they regularly brought trays full of free water into the chess room, and some even closed their eyes when it came time to pay the bill.

This particular biotope of worldly contemporaries deserved journalistic scrutiny, Reismann thought. The 1987 World Chess Championship turned out to be a suitable topic. Viennaa men’s fashion and lifestyle magazine, commissioned him and Manfred Sax to report.

The photographer and the author worked together regularly at that time. Explorations on the margins of society led them to young punks, homeless people and drug addicts. Their reports on the Austrian neo-Nazi scene also find international takers when Kurt Waldheim is President of the Republic of Austria. Sax later moved to England, but still regularly visits the editorial staff of Vienna. Reismann made a name for himself as a magazine photographer, particularly with portraits.

When the pandemic hit and there wasn’t much to do, he dug into his black and white archive and came across about 500 chess photos. He remembered that in the past, the café often exhibited works by students from the art academy around the corner. Will he be able, many years later, to exhibit prints of his report at the very place where the images were born?

Twenty-six prints from Reismann’s 1987 photo series are now on display at the café.

You can find more photos in the gallery (see above)

Michaela Drescher was photographed at the Café Museum by Kineke Mulder for his series of portraits cute chess (Liebenswerte Schachfiguren).

Michaela Drescher (Photo: Kineke Mulder)

In the meantime, the management has changed several times. In the mid-1990s, Chess was relegated to a location next to the toilets once the old room was used as a non-smoking area. A joint protest letter from the chess players was ineffective. When renovations began in 2003, the failures in the café were over. The student crowd also stopped visiting. Since the renovation, the price level has mainly attracted tourists. In 2010, the Querfeld family took over.

Photo: Sandra Felber

Photo: Sandra Felber

Irmgard Querfeld liked Reismann’s suggestion. Twenty-six large-format prints, all in black and white, are on display until at least the end of March. To go with, Vienna uploaded the report to their webpage. Word quickly spread that chess was welcome again. The association Frau Schach and chess players Philharmonic have found a new meeting place at the Museum.

Connections

]]> Holocaust artifacts, kept by survivor in HB’s lumber yard turned museum, find a home https://laprairie-shlm.com/holocaust-artifacts-kept-by-survivor-in-hbs-lumber-yard-turned-museum-find-a-home/ Sat, 05 Feb 2022 03:35:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/holocaust-artifacts-kept-by-survivor-in-hbs-lumber-yard-turned-museum-find-a-home/ For decades, a Huntington Beach lumber yard was the site of a museum where visitors got a surprisingly honest look at the Holocaust seen through the eyes of someone who had lived through its horrors and survived. . Ideal Pallet System, Inc. on Cedar Drive was owned and operated by Mel Mermelstein, imprisoned in Auschwitz […]]]>

For decades, a Huntington Beach lumber yard was the site of a museum where visitors got a surprisingly honest look at the Holocaust seen through the eyes of someone who had lived through its horrors and survived. .

Ideal Pallet System, Inc. on Cedar Drive was owned and operated by Mel Mermelstein, imprisoned in Auschwitz at the age of 17 and the only member of his immediate family to make it out alive.

Committed to collecting evidence of atrocities committed against the Jewish people at Auschwitz, Buchenwald and beyond, Mermelstein began traveling abroad in 1967, visiting death camps and collecting grim artifacts found there – bullet casings to bone fragments to the remains of barbed wire fences and the structures they surrounded.

Mel Mermelstein in 1967 stands in the wreckage of a former concentration camp on one of the many trips he would make to Europe to collect Holocaust artifacts.

(Courtesy of the Auschwitz Study Foundation)

These finds, coupled with memorabilia Mermelstein had kept or received for several years, quickly coalesced into a collection of more than 700 pieces, some of which the Long Beach resident will submit as evidence in court to get a ruling from a court. judge in 1981 establishing the Holocaust as indisputable fact.

The collection would be on display in shipping containers at the Lumber Yard, a museum Mermelstein has opened to schools free of charge, his daughter, Edie, said Friday.

“You didn’t even know it was in there, and then you walked in and there was 1,600 square feet of stuff,” she said. “It was really very low – only teachers who knew us came. My father used to tell his director and his employees that they had to stop working while the students were there, so that there would be no noise.

A photo of Holocaust survivor Mel Mermelstein above a sketch of Holocaust deniers in an exhibit at the Chabad Center.

A photo of Holocaust survivor Mel Mermelstein above a sketch of Holocaust deniers in a courtroom on display at the Chabad Center for Jewish Life in Newport Beach.

(Kevin Chang / personal photographer)

In 1978, Mermelstein created the Auschwitz Study Foundation, a non-profit organization whose board members have embraced its mission to educate future generations about the Holocaust in hopes of inspiring them to live in peace and harmony. Their work will continue even after the lumber yard and the collection are closed to visitors in 2018.

Mermelstein died on January 28 of complications from COVID-19, but his mission continues and plans to expand are underway – his collection recently found a home in Newport Beach’s Chabad Center for Jewish Life.

At a grand opening ceremony in late August, Edie Mermelstein joined ASF board members and Chabad Center leaders in what they hope will become a county Holocaust education center. of Orange.

The exhibition is currently open to groups by reservation and features around 70 objects, including works of art created by Mermelstein from everyday objects and artifacts. The plan is to open the space to the visiting public in the coming months and rotate the items, so the entire collection can be viewed.

Rabbi Reuven Mintz, who heads the Newport Beach organization, said Mermelstein had dedicated his life to serving as a witness and promised the Chabad Center would build on that commitment.

Majdanek Concentration Camp children's shoes on display at the Chabad Center for Jewish Life in Newport Beach.

Children’s shoes salvaged from the Majdanek concentration camp and made into works of art by Holocaust survivor Mel Mermelstein are on display at the Chabad Center for Jewish Life in Newport Beach.

(Kevin Chang / personal photographer)

“He equipped himself with these tools of darkness, used to murder millions of people, and he transformed these tools of darkness into instruments of light,” Mintz said Friday. “We will redouble our efforts now that Mel has passed away and passed on his torch to us, his family and the community.”

Josh Anderson, a high school English teacher at Huntington Beach High School, has joined the Auschwitz Studies Foundation board of trustees after taking sophomores to study the Holocaust on numerous field trips to the Mermelstein lumber yard and seeing the impact it had first hand.

“They really don’t understand if they just see it in a book or a video,” he said. “When they can see the barbed wire, the Stars of David and the showerheads, it becomes super real.”

Anderson recounted how when Mermelstein was a teenager in Auschwitz, his father told him and his brother that they should separate, to increase the chances that one of them would make it out alive and tell the story of the Holocaust so the world will never forget.

Bullet casings recovered from Auschwitz were displayed Friday at the Chabad Center for Jewish Life in Newport Beach.

Bullet casings recovered from the Auschwitz grounds were displayed in the Mermelstein exhibit Friday at the Chabad Center for Jewish Life in Newport Beach.

(Kevin Chang / personal photographer)

“He did that and he lived to be 95,” Anderson said. “Now it’s Edie’s job, and my job, and the job of the board and all the teachers in Orange County to tell her story.”

Edie Mermelstein, who lives and practices law in Huntington Beach, is currently working on a documentary about her own family’s history called “Live to Tell.” Still busy fielding requests for comment on her father’s passing from The New York Times, The Washington Post and NBC’s “Today” show, she has yet to have time to fully mourn her loss.

Instead, the self-proclaimed “keeper” of the artifact collection, she carries on her father’s mission.

“He was very dedicated and he was just a peacemaker,” she said. “He believed that bringing Auschwitz to the United States would help bring peace and understanding among people. I know his legacy will live on.

Mel Mermelstein, seen in 2015, displayed Holocaust artifacts for decades at a museum in his Huntington Beach lumberyard.

Mel Mermelstein, seen in 2015, displayed Holocaust artifacts for decades at a museum in his Huntington Beach lumberyard. He died Jan. 28 at his Long Beach home at the age of 95.

(Brad Alexander)

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