museum director – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 15:39:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://laprairie-shlm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-2-150x150.png museum director – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ 32 32 Cincinnati Museum to Loan Robert Henri Painting to LA’s Huntington Library After Losing Super Bowl Friendly Bet https://laprairie-shlm.com/cincinnati-museum-to-loan-robert-henri-painting-to-las-huntington-library-after-losing-super-bowl-friendly-bet/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 19:02:21 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/cincinnati-museum-to-loan-robert-henri-painting-to-las-huntington-library-after-losing-super-bowl-friendly-bet/ There was a lot at stake last night at Super Bowl LVI, and not just for the Los Angeles Rams and Cincinnati Bengals. California Huntington Library, Art Museum and Botanical Gardens teams up with the Cincinnati Museum of Art for a friendly bet, betting each of their Robert-Henri paintings to the other museum for loan. […]]]>

There was a lot at stake last night at Super Bowl LVI, and not just for the Los Angeles Rams and Cincinnati Bengals.

California Huntington Library, Art Museum and Botanical Gardens teams up with the Cincinnati Museum of Art for a friendly bet, betting each of their Robert-Henri paintings to the other museum for loan.

Cincinnati Serious Patience (1915) is a portrait of a young girl in blue, the official color of the Rams, while the subject of Huntington’s Irish girl (1927) has a reddish-orange border on his white coat, reminiscent of the Bengals’ tiger-striped logo. Now that the Rams are reigning victorious, beating the Bengals 23-20, the paints will be reunited at the Huntington sometime later this year.

Serious Patience been waiting a long time to see her friend. After the Bengals take care of business on the football field on Sunday, she is invited to Cincinnati for a Dey play,” Cincinnati Art Museum director Cameron Kitchin wrote in a statement. declaration before the match (referring to Bengal’s unofficial chant, “who dey”).

When the Bengals scored, the museum announced “Touchdown Bengals!” to Facebooksharing a photo of Jim Dine’s 12ft tall bronze sculpture of a triumphant looking PInocchio that stands on the museum lawn.

It was the Huntington, of course, who had the last word. “Rams for Victory!” the museum wrote on Twittersharing an image of Irish girl with a Rams hat and the Lombardi Trophy. “Good game @cincyartmuseum – looking forward to hosting Serious Patience at the Huntington soon.

Henri is an intriguing figure in the history of art in the United States. Cincinnati native Robert Henry Cozad was forced to change his name after his father fatally shot another man during a cattle dispute in Nebraska. The artist studied at Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia and at the Académie Julian in Paris, but sought to go beyond the impressionist style of painting then dominant. Henri revolted against American academic art, helping to found what became known as the Ashcan School of American art.

The Henri bet, reported for the first time by the Cincinnati Business Mail, marks the first time in four years that museums have gotten in on the Super Bowl action. In 2018, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston shipped Mrs. James Warren (Mercy Otis), California. 1763, by John Singleton Copley to the Philadelphia Museum of Art after the Eagles beat the New England Patriots 41-33.

The museum’s first bet on the Super Bowl was placed in 2010, at the request of art journalist Tyler Green. After Green suggested the idea on his blog, Max Anderson, director of the Indianapolis Museum of Art goaded New Orleans Art Museum director John Bullard to bet on Indianapolis The Fifth Plague of Egypt through JMW Turner against New Orleans Ideal view of Tivoli through Claude Lorrain. (The New Orleans Saints won 31-17.)

In the years that followed, the Denver Art Museum lent the Seattle Art Museum Frederic Remingtonthe bronze sculpture of The bronchos hunter when the Seahawks beat the Broncos in 2014. The following year, when Seattle lost to the Patriots, he sent Albert Bierstadtit is Puget Sound on the Pacific Coast (1870) at the Clark Institute of Artin Williamstown, Massachusetts.

In 2017, the MFA Boston and the Top Art Museum in Atlanta refused to bet on any art, but engaged in meme-based trash talk in the Twitter-based #MuseumBowl in honor of the game.

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The Museum of Arts and Design is holding an exhibition of otherworldly sculptural furniture by Detroit-based artist Chris Schanck https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-museum-of-arts-and-design-is-holding-an-exhibition-of-otherworldly-sculptural-furniture-by-detroit-based-artist-chris-schanck/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 17:25:42 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-museum-of-arts-and-design-is-holding-an-exhibition-of-otherworldly-sculptural-furniture-by-detroit-based-artist-chris-schanck/ The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) will present Chris Schanck: Off-World, with a series of paintings that showcase the Detroit-based artist’s striking, otherworldly furniture shapes. Also included are several recently completed works that explore the artist’s new directions towards the figurative and the personal. From February 12, 2022 to January 8, 2023, Schanck’s first […]]]>

The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) will present Chris Schanck: Off-World, with a series of paintings that showcase the Detroit-based artist’s striking, otherworldly furniture shapes. Also included are several recently completed works that explore the artist’s new directions towards the figurative and the personal.

From February 12, 2022 to January 8, 2023, Schanck’s first solo museum exhibition in New York is an in-depth look at the artist’s commitment to blurring the boundaries of art and design. Skillfully blending experiments in innovative materials with an expressive yet rigorous refinement of form, Schanck’s intricately sculpted, colorful and brilliant objects are contemporary talismans of stories from the past, present and future.

Over the past decade, Schanck has established himself as a leading figure in the world of design. Schanck established his freelance studio in Detroit in 2011, preferring to work outside of the furniture industry’s conventional coastal markets. His studio makes custom, labor-intensive furniture and furnishings, from chairs and tables to cabinets and lamps.

Each piece is meticulously handcrafted by a team of local Bangladeshi artists, designers and artisans, all of whom make essential contributions to the studio’s collective practice. Alongside his team, Schanck continues to refine his acclaimed signature manufacturing process titled Alufoil. The studio’s artisans polish thin pieces of aluminum foil onto the furniture’s structural frames, which are made of pieces of steel and hand-carved foam insulation. Encased in a final layer of transparent resin, like insects in chunks of amber, the pieces exhibit a depth and surface smoothness that belies the embedded shapes and crumpled leaf surfaces within. Beyond this signature process, other pieces are cast in aluminum and bronze, while other works use pigmented resins and dyes on found objects and wood particleboard.

The artist’s strange and unfamiliar forms suggest coral reefs, alien worlds and artifacts from ancient civilizations. Other works, especially the later figurative pieces, refer to mythology, poetry, and aspects of his own life. At the same time, Schanck’s works remain rooted in the reality of humanity’s negligence, necessity and inventiveness. Schanck draws from a wide range of influences, ranging from his local Detroit environment, Brutalist and Art Deco architecture, ancient Egyptian and Aztec iconography, to motifs from the fringes of popular culture. As a result, each work is a grainy reflection of an alternate universe rarely explored in contemporary design.

“My works exist on a spectrum, on the one hand they are practical and functional, and on the other they are ambitious and speculative – a mixture of reality and fantasy. Imagine a crib that is shaped like a rocket or an automobile Practicality This bed’s function takes on the form of a fantasy We understand that you can’t start the bed and fly away, but in the child it inspires the idea of ​​speed and exploration. My work works a lot like this bed,” Schanck said.

Curated by Cranbrook Art Museum Director Andrew Blauvelt, the exhibition is the result of a long-standing creative dialogue between Blauvelt and Schanck, who graduated from the Cranbrook Academy of Art in 2011.

“Schanck is one of the most exciting artists working in contemporary furniture design today. His work represents the fruitful integration of art and design. Conceptually rich, materially inventive and aesthetically adventurous, he defies our expectations when it comes to design – it does not quietly occupy space, but rather inhabits our minds and engages our senses,” said Blauvelt.

Coinciding with the exhibition, MAD will host a series of year-long public programs in which artists and designers will explore the creative potential of industrially produced objects discarded daily on the streets of New York. Collaborators Thomas Barger, Shari Mendelson and Studio Nito will lead attendees through hands-on workshops to transform waste into raw materials for art and design. This summer, MAD will engage its visitors to create a floating sculpture of discarded plastic bags called Museo Aero Solar, an open source project initiated by Tomas Saraceno.

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Lack of Jewish heritage at LA’s Academy Museum of Motion Pictures sparks outcry https://laprairie-shlm.com/lack-of-jewish-heritage-at-las-academy-museum-of-motion-pictures-sparks-outcry/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 10:37:31 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/lack-of-jewish-heritage-at-las-academy-museum-of-motion-pictures-sparks-outcry/ The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles, which aims to dedicate a century of cinema to Hollywood, has come under criticism for its exhibits excluding Jewish filmmakers who played a key role in launching the industry. Donors and influential members of the academy have complained that there is no mention of the mostly […]]]>

The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles, which aims to dedicate a century of cinema to Hollywood, has come under criticism for its exhibits excluding Jewish filmmakers who played a key role in launching the industry.

Donors and influential members of the academy have complained that there is no mention of the mostly immigrant Jews who established the industry after escaping persecution in their homelands., reports Rolling Stone magazine.

Some customers have threatened to withdraw support over the issue, sources familiar with the developments told the magazine in a published report Thusday.

The museum opened on September 25 last year with a star-studded event, but already then some were wondering what was missing from the exhibits.

Anti-Defamation League CEO Jonathan Greenblatt, who was at the opening of the gala, told the magazine of his disappointment at what he felt was a “glaring omission”.

“As I was walking, I literally turned to the person I was with and said, ‘Where are the Jews?’ “, he said.

“I would have hoped that any honest historical assessment of the film industry — its origins, its development, its growth — would include the role Jews played in building the industry from the ground up,” Greenblatt said.

Illustrative: Anti-Defamation League CEO Jonathan Greenblatt speaks at the group’s 2018 National Leadership Summit in Washington, DC. (Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images/JTA)

The absence was noted by various outlets, drawing criticism from The Forward, Air Mail and Bari Weiss’ Common Sense website on the Substack platform.

However, a source familiar with the museum’s lineup told Rolling Stone that there was not enough pressure from influential figures to include Jews.

“A lot of people who could have fought harder for Jewish representation were just very low,” the anonymous source said.

“It’s a conspiracy of silence and it’s deeply upsetting,” Greenblatt said.

“By not including the founding fathers, they were making a massive statement,” said academy member and film financier Ryan Kavanaugh. “As grandsons of Holocaust survivors, it’s just shocking that they erased contributions from a group facing severe anti-Semitism – they couldn’t get bank loans, they couldn’t own houses in Los Angeles, and yet they still created this industry that is the foundation of the economy of Los Angeles and touches people all over the world.”

“Instead of, ‘Look what they were able to do,’ it’s just wiped out,” complained Kavanaugh, who founded Triller, a video-sharing social media network. “It goes against everything our industry says they stand for.”

The museum’s exhibits after it opened tended to focus on more contemporary figures, with one member of the academy saying it made it seem like “the film industry was created 10 years ago. They erased the past. And I find that appalling. »

Haim Saban speaks at the unveiling of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures’ Saban Building event at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles on Dec. 4, 2018. (Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP)

Haim Saban, whose $50 million contribution to the museum was the largest donation, said he and his wife Cheryl have spoken with museum management and take their comments “seriously”.

The Sabans “strongly believe that Jewish contributions to the film industry from its founding to the present day should be showcased,” he said.

Others defended the museum, saying it couldn’t showcase 100 years of history on its opening night.

“We didn’t come to opening night with the origin story, but we came to opening night with what was relevant to the audience we were playing and needed to include,” said Sid Ganis, Honorary Administrator. “I have friends who said to me, ‘Where are the Jews?’ It’s in the eyes of the beholder. They are here, and they will be there in a bigger and more visible way very soon. »

So far, more than 290,000 people have purchased tickets to the museum on Wilshire Boulevard, including film industry veterans. Museum director and president Bill Kramer said the administration was attentive to the comments.

“I’ve had interviews with four Academy members and two donors who wanted to better understand why they weren’t seeing an exhibit about Hollywood’s predominately Jewish founders, and we take that note very seriously,” he said. -he declares. “Representation is so important to us, including our Jewish founders. If we don’t talk about it in enough detail or in a more obvious way, we want to hear it and we want to respond to it. We have heard these notes, and we understand. And we are really happy to be able to make a change and we will correct our trajectory.

Screen capture from video of Director and President of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Bill Kramer, March 2021. (YouTube)

The museum is planning a new exhibit for next year that will focus on Hollywood’s founding fathers, he said. Initially planned as a temporary element, it will become a permanent exhibition following complaints.

Additionally, a six-week film series, “Vienna to Hollywood: Emigrants and Exiles in the Studio System,” launched in December, features mostly Jewish filmmakers, a move Saban welcomed.

“We have no doubt that as the museum’s dynamic exhibits continue to rotate, Jewish contributions will continue to be represented among the many important stories about film history, art and artists,” he said. -he declares.

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Banners of Asian American artists on display at the Noguchi Museum https://laprairie-shlm.com/banners-of-asian-american-artists-on-display-at-the-noguchi-museum/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 17:00:32 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/banners-of-asian-american-artists-on-display-at-the-noguchi-museum/ In response to the rise of anti-Asian hate crimes, the Noguchi museum in Long Island City launched its first open call for artist banners and honored the finalists at an opening reception, where the banner made its debut. The event held in November brought together artists and their guests, museum partner organizations, elected officials and […]]]>

In response to the rise of anti-Asian hate crimes, the Noguchi museum in Long Island City launched its first open call for artist banners and honored the finalists at an opening reception, where the banner made its debut.

The event held in November brought together artists and their guests, museum partner organizations, elected officials and staff, including Museum Director Brett Littman, who opened the reception.

In an effort to raise awareness and amplify local AAPI voices, emerging AAPI artists based in Queens were invited to submit designs for the museum’s outdoor banner space to advocate for the fight against racism, where one artist would earn an honorarium of $ 1,000 and two finalists would each receive $ 500.

The initiative was created to show solidarity with the Japanese heritage of museum founder Isamu Noguchi and to act against the Asian hatred that has circulated information since the start of the pandemic.

“Amid the escalation of violence against the AAPI community and across the United States, staff felt absolutely compelled to prove that we are allies of these marginalized communities,” Littman said in his speech to ‘opening.

According to the media coordinator of the Noguchi museum, Justin Baez, the artist applications were assessed by a jury made up of the museum’s organizing committee, an interdepartmental and intergenerational group of volunteers, including himself, and representatives. two local partner organizations, Queen’s Arts Council and Asian-American Arts Alliance.

After receiving and narrowing down more than 20 entries, the museum selected Chemin Hsiao as the first winner and Woomin Kim and Mo Kong as the finalists.

(From left to right) Mo Kong, Woomin Kim and Chemin Hsiao won the Noguchi Museum’s call for nominations. (Photo credit: Katherine Abbott)
(Left to right) Brett Littman, Mo Kong, Woomin Kim and Chemin Hsiao. (Photo credit: Katherine Abbott)

Featured through six outdoor banners, Hsiao’s work, titled “Dandelions Know” (2021), was chosen for its powerful message of anti-racism, solidarity and hope in response to the growing wave of violence and fear facing Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders across the United States.

“What attracted us to Hsiao’s work is his ability to capture a lot of personal emotions towards the subject, doing it in a way that is aesthetically translatable by the banners,” Baez said. “We also appreciated the way he approached not only anti-racism, but the current political landscape in a narrative way.”

Hsiao, an Elmhurst-based Taiwanese visual artist, was initially reluctant to submit a banner proposal, struggling to figure out how to approach the heavy topic.

What ultimately drove him to participate was how much he admired Noguchi’s experience as Nisei, a second-generation Japanese American, especially during WWII.

In his essay, “I Become a Nisei”, Noguchi wrote that the Nisei are “an intermediate people with no common ground.” This particular quote, Hsiao said, is the essence of the central dandelion.

“Overall, the banner should be about Asian hate crimes and violence, but this specific piece is about Mr. Noguchi himself and how he feels and how I relate to the fact that he’s from Taiwan.” , Hsiao said. “I just took that perspective and thought, as a Taiwanese and a member of the AAPI community living in New York City, how do I feel? “

When you arrive at the entrance to the museum, the banners are presented in sequential order: 1) “Surrounded”, 2) “Fear”, 3) “Cut the loop”, 4) “Dandelions know (as they float too ) ”, 5)“ Heal and forgive (if possible) ”, 6)“ We are only humans. Keep communicating.

“Each of them serves a different purpose, but if I had to choose [my favorite], it’s the happy accident at the center of the series, the dandelion, ”Hsiao said. “When I planned the six drafts, this one was the hardest to come out because it’s not really related to Asian hate crimes, but ultimately it’s the one that people identify with the most. “

“Dandelions Know” banner (Photo credit: Katherine Abbott)

Hsiao’s hope is that the public aspect of the artwork will pique the interest of all passers-by and make them stop, look, and be curious.

Inside the museum, there is a description of the banner, as well as descriptions and visuals of the proposed banners by the two finalists.

Kong, a Chinese multidisciplinary artist and researcher residing in Sunnyside, created his works in the midst of the pandemic, preserving objects, such as food and trinkets from childhood, in the tradition of classical art to the inside their refrigerator.

Whether the pictures act as some sort of puzzle or a familiar ensemble, Kong hopes people can always relate to the pictures.

“What I’m trying to do is use [this project] like a mirror to reflect and verify our personal history, where we came from and why certain things are important to us, ”Kong said. “I also want to show, especially to immigrant children and children, the possibilities of creating works of art. You don’t have to have high access to start making art, but it can be anything around you.

The next finalist, Kim, a South Korean artist based in Ridgewood, wanted to change the inaccurate and xenophobic narrative surrounding shijang, or street markets.

“I just wanted to create the shijang narrative in a way that I know is more accurate to me, which is very colorful and festive and full of energy and vibrancy,” Kim said. “This is an organic conservation of material that might not make sense in Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s.”

The museum was drawn to how Kim’s aesthetic combined with the theme, especially with his use of textiles and materiality. “The way she created the banners kind of speaks to and elevates the day to day nature of Asian American life,” Baez said.

Mo Kong showing their banner design to guests at the reception. (Photo credit: Katherine Abbott)

Through her panels, Kim hopes she can provide visitors from Asian communities with moments of familiarity and recall their own memories in a festive way, as well as being a voice for Asians’ daily experiences for those unfamiliar with them.

“We are really proud of our finalists and the artists who submitted,” Baez said. “We hope that this will serve as a precedent and that we can continue this series in the following years, adopting different tones and requirements, while maintaining this fundamental vision and this desire to amplify the voice of local artists.”

The banners are displayed outside the entrance to the museum.

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New Blanton Museum of Art exhibit showcases the talents of artist Terry Allen https://laprairie-shlm.com/new-blanton-museum-of-art-exhibit-showcases-the-talents-of-artist-terry-allen/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 15:36:29 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/new-blanton-museum-of-art-exhibit-showcases-the-talents-of-artist-terry-allen/ By Chris O’Connell in 40 acres, January | February 2022 to January 1, 2022 at 9:35 am | Terry Allen’s creative process is a mystery, even to him. In fact, he never knows where inspiration will take him. Although he created works in many disciplines, Allen was first known as one of the greatest narrative […]]]>

Terry Allen’s creative process is a mystery, even to him. In fact, he never knows where inspiration will take him. Although he created works in many disciplines, Allen was first known as one of the greatest narrative songwriters in country music, starting with the cult concept album Outlaw from 1975. Juárez. Although he continues to write and release complex country albums, the most recent being that of 2020 Just like Moby Dick—Allen’s work as a visual artist is at least equal to that of his legendary musical career.

But the former Guggenheim Fellow and several NEA Fellows with pieces in collections across the world, including the Museum of Modern Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, create art without too much regard for resulting media. He does not find inspiration and thinks to himself, it is a song, Where, it is certainly only a painting. Hell, sometimes it’s both. This is the case in many of his pieces in MemWars, an art exhibit that opened at the Blanton Museum of Art on December 18, which deals, as Allen puts it, “this battlefield of memory, I guess.”

“Wolfman of del Rio (MemWars),” for example, a mixed media work on paper created between 2018-19, shares a title with the fourth track from Allen’s 1979 double album. Lubbock (on everything). In the painting, images of a man and a wolf merge, just like the past with the present, and most importantly, Allen’s musical life becomes indistinguishable from his visual art. Basically, that’s how he creates.

“They’ve always been a thing to me. Playing music or creating visual pieces, whatever your sense of curiosity or where it takes you, I’m ready for it, ”Allen says. “This thing of trying to categorize things… I really don’t care about that.”

“Wolfman” joins about 21 other drawings, “densely hung,” at the request of Allen of Blanton’s deputy director of curatorial affairs, Carter E. Foster, on one side of a long black curtain in the contemporary gallery at the museum floor. Opposite is a multi-screen video installation, with Allen on one side and his wife, artist and writer Jo Harvey Allen on the other. They alternately tell stories about the songs’ possible origins, after which the two faces disappear and Allen appears on a third screen, performing with his back to the audience as he and his piano roar down a long, flat highway for over an hour. . Video isn’t necessarily connected to other visual pieces, Allen says, but similar themes emerge when the exhibit is viewed holistically.

“It’s always a mystery where a song comes from, even at the most obvious, it’s always a mystery that it becomes a song to me,” Allen says. “This song kind of deals with that idea.”

Allen met Foster through a mutual friend, museum director Kippy Stroud, who hosted an annual residency in Maine for artists, writers and curators each year. About 10 years ago the two were in Maine and Foster saw Allen’s works during a residency presentation. Foster says he “seemed crazy not to” organize a contemporary art exhibition for Terry Allen at the Blanton when another colleague suggested it. Prior to that, however, in 2015, Stroud passed away suddenly during one of the residences. In thanks to Stroud who brought Allen and Foster together, MemWars includes a song called “Song For Kippy”.

“She had an everlasting influence on everyone she came in contact with, and I’m not sure if she really knew the impact she was having on people,” Allen said. “But then, for me, that was a real anchor in this show.”

Much of the exhibition touches on people like Stroud, whose experiences left a deep mark on Allen. One of them talks about his cousin’s failed attempt to perform a second act as a professional archer following a dishonorable discharge during his fourth tour of Vietnam. “The war basically killed him, but it took about 40 years to do it,” Allen says.

Another, “Roadrunner”, tells of a high school friend who was killed in early Vietnam. A high school track and field champion, he had roadrunners tattooed on his calves and when he died in action he was identified by these markings. Allen’s astute listeners might recognize the name “Blue Asian Reds (for Roadrunner),” a 1979 song written from the perspective of his friend’s grieving girlfriend.

“He was the first person to make war a reality for me,” Allen says. “I was in art school in California and got a call saying it blew up in Vietnam. And it was just inconceivable to me if this human that I knew and who was a friend of mine was there. There are songs in the series that address that.

Allen says that while these plays deal with the battlefield of his memory – and often real settings of war – his work was not born out of a cathartic triumph over emotion.

“It’s more of a cold-blooded thing to do something,” he said. “You just do that thing and then you step back and maybe try to come to terms with it and figure out what it is. But it’s really about the thing. It’s not about you; it’s about you; it’s about what you do.

MemWars runs until July 10, 2022, at the Blanton Museum of Art.

CREDITS: © Terry Allen, Courtesy of LA. Louver, Venice, California


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Turkish influencer convicted of posing with penis sculpture at Amsterdam sex museum https://laprairie-shlm.com/turkish-influencer-convicted-of-posing-with-penis-sculpture-at-amsterdam-sex-museum/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 18:34:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/turkish-influencer-convicted-of-posing-with-penis-sculpture-at-amsterdam-sex-museum/ A Turkish social media influencer was reportedly given a five-month suspended prison sentence for breaking obscenity laws in her country after posing with a giant penis at Amsterdam’s famous Sex Museum. Merve Taskin, 23, who has around 573,000 Instagram followers, used the site to share pictures of sex toys she bought at the museum during […]]]>

A Turkish social media influencer was reportedly given a five-month suspended prison sentence for breaking obscenity laws in her country after posing with a giant penis at Amsterdam’s famous Sex Museum.

Merve Taskin, 23, who has around 573,000 Instagram followers, used the site to share pictures of sex toys she bought at the museum during a birthday trip to the Netherlands in January 2020.

In one striking image, the daring brunette is seen straddling the massive member as she sits on a pair of gargantuan gonads.

Other images she posted included penis-shaped pasta, a “sexy bottle opener” and a snap of her standing behind a door designed after a brothel in the Dutch capital’s famous red light district. .

While Taskin deemed the pictures innocent enough, the Turkish authorities took offense and slapped her with the charges under article 226 of the penal code relating to the obscenity of her country.

Under Turkish law, Taskin faced up to three years in prison, but was given a five-month suspended sentence, not so harsh, the Daily Star reported.

She wrote on her Instagram page that the phrase means “if I do not willfully commit a crime within five years, the provision will be rescinded with all its consequences.”

Merve Taskin was given a five-month suspended prison sentence for breaking obscenity laws in Amsterdam after posting a video of her posing with a giant penis at the Amsterdam Sex Museum.
Newsflash

“Against the advice, we said that, in general, my messages are within the limits of freedom of expression, that there is no precedent in the world, and that this concrete situation does not mean not that our investigative authority is carrying out an investigation that will set an example for the world, but that it shows how far behind the world we are in terms of freedom of expression, ”she added in the message, according to a translation from Turkish.

“However, the court didn’t agree with us, so they sentenced me to five months in prison,” Taskin said.

Museum director Monique van Marle said after sentencing that the installation “is meant to educate people around the world about the history of sex.

The Turkish authorities claim that Merve Taskin violated article 226 of the penal code relating to the obscenity of the country.
The Turkish authorities claim that Merve Taskin violated article 226 of the penal code relating to the obscenity of the country.
Instagram

“We admire you for expressing yourself and posting such photos,” she added, told the Daily Star.

Human rights groups have said freedom of expression online has taken a hit in Turkey under President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s government.

Turkey “remains one of the most difficult places in the European region to exercise your right to freedom of speech and expression,” according to Freedom House, a nonprofit group that conducts research and advocacy on the issue. democracy, political freedom and human rights.

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Heritage pieces in the Tunceli museum shed light on Anatolian history https://laprairie-shlm.com/heritage-pieces-in-the-tunceli-museum-shed-light-on-anatolian-history/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 13:55:47 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/heritage-pieces-in-the-tunceli-museum-shed-light-on-anatolian-history/ The historical pieces on display at the Tunceli Museum, one of Turkey’s favorite museums, take its visitors on a journey into the past. The museum consists of 4 blocks and 5,800 square meters (6,936 square meters) of indoor space in the eastern province of Tunceli, which is of great importance in terms of tourism with […]]]>

The historical pieces on display at the Tunceli Museum, one of Turkey’s favorite museums, take its visitors on a journey into the past.

The museum consists of 4 blocks and 5,800 square meters (6,936 square meters) of indoor space in the eastern province of Tunceli, which is of great importance in terms of tourism with its unspoiled nature and cultural riches. In addition to sections featuring written and visual displays, it also welcomes visitors with sections including “Alevism”, “archeology”, “library” and “ethnography”. While nearly 2,000 artefacts are on display in the display cases, around 700 artefacts are kept under protection in the museum’s warehouses.

Pieces on display at the Tunceli Museum, Tunceli, eastern Turkey, December 26, 2021. (AA)

Among the most striking works in the museum are the coin collections belonging to the Greek, Roman, Umayyad, Abbasid, Artuqid, Aq Qoyunlu, Rum Seljuk Sultanate and Ottoman periods. About 170 coins, which were collected through donations, purchases or excavations and taken under protection in the museum, feature significant archaeological finds with the numbers engraved on them.

The coins, which are a source of material culture in terms of Tunceli history, give clues to the periods in which they were made through the state coat of arms, the name of the ruler who minted them, their date of issue and the city where they were struck.

At the same time, figures to which Anatolian civilizations attribute symbolic value according to their cultures, mythologies, geography and the events they have experienced stand out on the coins.

Pieces on display at the Tunceli Museum, Tunceli, eastern Turkey, December 26, 2021. (AA)

Pieces on display at the Tunceli Museum, Tunceli, eastern Turkey, December 26, 2021. (AA)

Speaking to Anadolu Agency (AA), Tunceli museum director Kenan ncel said the museum houses artefacts that are thousands of years old. Stating that the pieces on display in the museum are among the important works, ncel said: “We have a wide variety of exhibits of pieces from the Greek period to the Roman, Byzantine, Sassanid, Anatolia, Abbasis, Umayyad, Ilkhanate and Ottoman periods. in our museum. With the invention of money and the discovery of silver by the Lydians, silver was widely used in Anatolia. Coins of a civilization from the Aegean region can be found today in Tunceli, as the coins were used as trade materials. “

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Forbes India – Museum, Art: Iraqi museum restores treasures destroyed by Islamic State jihadists https://laprairie-shlm.com/forbes-india-museum-art-iraqi-museum-restores-treasures-destroyed-by-islamic-state-jihadists/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 13:00:12 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/forbes-india-museum-art-iraqi-museum-restores-treasures-destroyed-by-islamic-state-jihadists/ Mosul museum worker tries to assemble larger artifact with cuneiform inscriptions from shattered fragments at city museum in northern Iraq Image: Zaid AL-Obeidi / AFP LCollapsed by the jihadists, the once famous Iraqi museum in Mosul and its 2,500-year-old treasures have been given a second life thanks to restoration efforts supported by French experts. Ancient […]]]>

Mosul museum worker tries to assemble larger artifact with cuneiform inscriptions from shattered fragments at city museum in northern Iraq
Image: Zaid AL-Obeidi / AFP

LCollapsed by the jihadists, the once famous Iraqi museum in Mosul and its 2,500-year-old treasures have been given a second life thanks to restoration efforts supported by French experts.

Ancient artifacts in the museum were shattered into small pieces when fighters from the Islamic State group seized the northern city of Mosul in 2014 and made it the seat of power for three years.

“We have to separate all the fragments … It’s like a puzzle, you try to recover the pieces which tell the same story”, declared the restorer Daniel Ibled, mandated by the famous Louvre museum, which supports the employees of the Iraqi museums.

“Little by little, you manage to recreate the whole set.”

When IS jihadists were in command, they filmed themselves hammering away pre-Islamic treasures they considered heretical, proudly announcing their rampage in a video posted in February 2015.

The biggest and heaviest artifacts were destroyed for their propaganda, but smaller pieces were sold on black markets around the world.

The scars of their destruction remain today.

On the ground floor of the museum, the foundation’s twisted iron bars pierce a gaping hole.

In other rooms, stones of various sizes are scattered, some bearing engravings of animal paws or wings. Others have inscriptions in cuneiform script.

The smallest of these fragments, no bigger than a fist, are lined up on a table and the experts are busy sorting them out.

For now, their efforts are focused on a winged lion from the city of Nimrud, the jewel of the Assyrian Empire, two “lamassu” – winged bulls with human heads – and the base of the throne of King Ashurnasirpal II.

Giant puzzle

These pieces, many of which date from the first millennium BC, are being revived with funding from the International Alliance for the Protection of Cultural Heritage in Conflict Zones (ALIPH).

Alongside the Louvre, efforts are also being made by the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, which trains the museum’s teams, as well as by the World Monuments Fund, headquartered in New York, which is responsible for restoring the building.

The base of the Assyrian king’s throne, covered in cuneiform writing, seems almost fixed.

Some parts are held together by elastic bands or small metal rings.

“The base of the throne was pulverized in more than 850 pieces,” said museum official Choueib Firas Ibrahim, an expert in Sumerian studies. “We have recovered two-thirds of it.

For some pieces, writing fragments or straight lines help teams put them together like a giant jigsaw puzzle.

“We read the inscriptions on this basis, and we were able to put the pieces back in their place,” said restorer Taha Yassin.

But other pieces without a “flat surface or inscriptions” make them virtually indistinguishable and are more complicated, Yassin added.

Empty spaces

A year after the recapture of Mosul by Iraqi troops in 2017, the museum received an urgent grant in an attempt to restore it to its former glory.

After delays due to the coronavirus pandemic, museum director Zaid Ghazi Saadallah said he hoped restoration work would be completed within five years.

But many gaps will remain and posters on the walls identify the lost items.

“Most of the rooms are destroyed or looted,” Saadallah said.

Iraq has suffered for decades from the looting of its antiquities, especially after the US-led invasion in 2003, as well as during ISIS’s subsequent takeover.

But the current government says it has made repatriation of artifacts a priority.

The Louvre has tasked 20 people to help with restoration efforts, said Ariane Thomas, director of the Louvre’s Near Eastern Antiquities Department.

After three missions this year, seven French experts will take turns in Iraq to guide the restoration process, carried out with around ten museum employees.

Once the restoration work is completed, an online exhibition will be organized to unveil the work.

“When we said that with time, money and know-how, we could bring even the most damaged works back to life, it proves it,” Thomas said.

“Completely destroyed works have started to take shape again.”

Click here to see Forbes India’s full coverage of the Covid-19 situation and its impact on life, business and economy

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He donated art, sound and movement to the Morris Museum. Now he’s moving on. https://laprairie-shlm.com/he-donated-art-sound-and-movement-to-the-morris-museum-now-hes-moving-on/ Thu, 27 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/he-donated-art-sound-and-movement-to-the-morris-museum-now-hes-moving-on/ He got the Morris Museum a coveted affiliation with the Smithsonian Institution. He gave the museum a mission statement. He got the museum through a pandemic. Now he comes out. Cleveland Johnson, the Oxford-educated music scholar hired in 2017 to reinvent the place of Morris Township, is retiring as the museum’s president and CEO. Director […]]]>

He got the Morris Museum a coveted affiliation with the Smithsonian Institution. He gave the museum a mission statement. He got the museum through a pandemic.

Now he comes out.

Cleveland Johnson, the Oxford-educated music scholar hired in 2017 to reinvent the place of Morris Township, is retiring as the museum’s president and CEO.

Director Cleveland Johnson welcomes you to ‘Curious Characters’ at the Morris Museum, March 15, 2018. Photo by Kevin Coughlin

“If I were at any other stage in my career I would happily spend another decade at the Morris Museum. too long,” Johnson, 65, said.

He has offered to stay on until the end of the year, while the museum board searches for his successor. Johnson will leave a few admirers.

“He transformed the museum. It was not in very good condition when it arrived,” the vice-chairman of the board said. Nelson Schaenen Jr.

“He was a godsend when he arrived. He transformed this museum in an incredible way, in record time,” the President Emeritus said. Gerry Horn.

Artist with his graffiti art at the Morris Museum, October 3, 2019. Photo by Marion Filler

Johnson worked to transform a century-old museum – known to generations of school children for its teddy bear, toy trains and gem collection – into a cultural destination devoted to “art, sound and movement”.

The reboot included graffiti and punk rock picture and steampunk shows, a conference of Johnny on the south side, and programs by composer Robert Sirota and choreographer Kyle Marshall.

When the pandemic closed the galleries and its 312-seat Bickford Theater, the museum moved jazz ensembles, classical concerts and small plays to its parking lot.

Nicole Burgio in “xoxo moongirl”, in the parking lot of the Morris Museum, September 25, 2020. Photo by Kevin Coughlin

One evening, a trapeze artist swirled above a socially distanced crowd to live cello music accents.

“Institutions that are as old as us…can either try to die a graceful death and just fade away with dignity. Or you can decide how you will embrace the future, grow and adapt. And that’s what our board chose to do, I think with great bravery and courage,” Johnson said. tells customers via Zoom earlier this month, announcing an upcoming exhibition of black quilt artists with Art in the Atrium Inc.

As the museum emerges from the pandemic, two 2019 milestones should be better off, which bodes well for the future, Johnson says.

Most significant is the museum’s designation as a Smithsonian Affiliate. As the only nonprofit in New Jersey with such recognition, the museum can tap into a universe of simulcasts, traveling exhibits and staff training opportunities, Johnson said.

Executive Director of the Cleveland Johnson Museum at 'Simply Steampunk' at the Morris Museum, March 2019. Photo by Kevin Coughlin
Morristown artist Kenneth MacBain with museum executive director Cleveland Johnson at ‘Simply Steampunk’ at the Morris Museum, March 2019. Photo by Kevin Coughlin

He also helped the council articulate a vision, with the museum’s 150 pieces Murtogh D. Guinness Collection 19th century music boxes and automatons as a primary objective: Interpreting the past, discovering the future, through art, sound and movement.

A series of innovative exhibits showcased “kinetic art”. AutomataCon bring robotic flowers and mechanical horses at the Frelinghuysen family’s former Twin Oaks estate.

Video: “Curious Characters” at the Morris Museum in 2018:

“It’s historic technology that paves the way for today,” Johnson said of the Guinness collection, which the museum acquired in 2003.

A piece of the Guinness Collection at the Morris Museum.

The challenge, he said, is to look at these complex mechanical musical instruments through a contemporary lens, asking how humanity has used technology for entertainment throughout history.

“We no longer need to play the piano. We just have a machine playing it for us. It points the way to Spotify, the idea that we have music on demand… Automatons paved the way for robotics,” said Johnson, music professor emeritus at DePauw University.

Such explorations aim to produce a contemporary and relevant museum “with a very unique way of seeing things that sets us apart from the other tens of thousands of museums out there,” Johnson said.

A PLACE IN TRANSITION

A pipe organ expert, Johnson was hired at the University of South Dakota. national music museum during a turbulent time at the Morris Museum.

A director left after six years. A new hire has been announced, to be abandoned a few days later without explanation.

Morris Museum Executive Director Cleveland Johnson at the “Bob Gruen: Rock Seen” exhibit, Morris Museum, June 20, 2019. Photo by Kevin Coughlin

Johnson took control of an organization that grew from a cabinet of curiosities at the Morristown Neighborhood House in 1913 to an eclectic collection of 50,000 items including Native American dolls and replica dinosaur bones, on a budget of $2.5 million and 25 employees.

The venue was struggling to recover from the recession, which followed a costly 2007 expansion to house the Guinness Collection. Staff turnover was high and the museum had lost the Friends of the Morris Museum, fundraising volunteers who faced Johnson’s predecessor.

Living Arts Curator Brett Wellman Messenger enjoys the photo of Tina Turner at the ‘Bob Gruen: Rock Seen’ exhibition, Morris Museum, June 20, 2019. Photo by Kevin Coughlin

Some tough decisions were made under Johnson’s watch. Locally produced shows were phased out at the Bickford, and its longtime artistic director was fired.

To breathe new energy, Ronald Labaco was hired from the Museum of Arts and Design in New York as a curator, and Messenger Brett Wellman came on board as an event programmer.

The museum lost four people from its education department during the pandemic but stayed afloat with government help, Johnson said.

Brett King from North Carolina with his Steam-Punk version of Apple's Siri,
North Carolina’s Brett King with his Steam-Punk version of Apple’s Siri, “The Aetherologist,” at “Curious Characters” at the Morris Museum in 2018. Photo by Kevin Coughlin

When he arrived from a small town on the prairies, he was surprised to discover how cultural institutions are struggling in such a prosperous region.

Still, Johnson feels he’s leaving things better than he found them, for whoever follows.

“A lot of things are kind of in the queue and really waiting for someone with the energy and the interest to get things done,” he said.

As for retirement, Johnson is looking forward to completing his university research. And maybe become a concert organist again.

“The idea of ​​having time to spend two or three hours a day practicing and playing is something that I had to put on hold for a very long time,” Johnson said.

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Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Art Heist gets another narrative in new Netflix docuseries https://laprairie-shlm.com/isabella-stewart-gardner-museum-art-heist-gets-another-narrative-in-new-netflix-docuseries/ Mon, 05 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/isabella-stewart-gardner-museum-art-heist-gets-another-narrative-in-new-netflix-docuseries/ After more than 30 years, the story of the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum burglary has all the attributes of a spectacular real crime drama. The thief’s disguises, thugs and missing artwork valued at over $ 500 million have captivated and baffled law enforcement, journalists, book authors and podcast hosts. Yet no matter how many people […]]]>

After more than 30 years, the story of the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum burglary has all the attributes of a spectacular real crime drama. The thief’s disguises, thugs and missing artwork valued at over $ 500 million have captivated and baffled law enforcement, journalists, book authors and podcast hosts. Yet no matter how many people look into the facts, the crime remains unsolved.

The new four-part Netflix docuseries “This Is a Robbery: The World’s Biggest Art Heist,” premiering April 7, aren’t expected to be putting anyone behind bars anytime soon. But it will potentially introduce a new audience to the remarkable event and its seemingly endless number of weird characters and rabbit hole theories. Aside from getting an entertaining fix and then spending the night, the hope of another Gardner tale, one presumes, is that the show could finally get someone who knows something to talk.

Told in four “chapters” of over 50 minutes, the first tells the story of the crime through a combination of dramatization, archival photographs, television news footage and ongoing interviews. At a minimum, the visual juxtaposition of yesterday and today serves as a brutal reminder of the time that has passed. The people originally involved in the case have retired; suspects were murdered or died of natural causes. Even the boxy cars and clunky technology (convincingly portrayed in the scenes staged by the Berkshire Theater Group) suggest it’s time to pass the torch to a new generation of detectives who are getting closer with each passing year.

The series opens with witnesses who say they saw two men dressed as Boston police officers sitting in a hatchback on Palace Road just outside the museum in the wee hours of March 18, 1990. A scene recreated shows the “officers” entered by telling museum security guard Richard Abath that they were investigating a disturbance. After handcuffing and blindfolding Abath and another guard, the thieves moved between the galleries for over an hour, littering the floor with shattered glass and emptying the gilded frames. A total of 13 pieces left the venue that night, including Rembrandt’s unique Seascape (“Christ in the Storm on the Sea of ​​Galilee”) and a Vermeer (“The Concert”), precious for its stunning sound. use of light and the limited number of his paintings in circulation.

While the first chapter drops several suspicious seeds to nurture later in the series, it does so impartially, without the thrilling music or tacky storytelling that makes other true crime dramas feel forced (strangely, both appear in the trailer). Instead, and preferably, it allows interviewees to showcase the museum’s intimidating Italian palace-inspired architecture, the incomparably arranged collection and the mastermind behind it, Isabella Stewart Gardner. Other reports on the heists, such as WBUR and The Boston Globe’s in depth Last seen podcast of 2018, gave him the same respect.

After a year without an actual gallery tour, seeing the interior of the museum was surprisingly poignant. So is Anne Hawley, former director of the Gardner and lead interviewee who recaps the crime and briefly points out that she is the first woman to oversee the world-class museum. She took the reins just six months before the heist, and footage likely taken the following morning shows her in shock. What a plate she was served and what a life she gave to the Gardner during her 25-year tenure.

Not all true crime aficionados will patiently wait for the juiciest stuff from who did it and why. The second chapter gets bogged down in an attempt to explore the vulnerabilities of the museum and the more obvious theory that, like the majority of art thefts, this was internal work. For this reason, Abath always has sidelong glances. (Okay, he would go to work stoned sometimes, and photos from that night show him with long, curly hair, a tie-dyed t-shirt and a fanny pack, ready to attend a Grateful Dead concert.) former colleague Net describes him as the “type of hippie who’s good at chess,” a combo as overwhelming as the one who let thieves in. The series spices up with absurd humor.

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Director Emeritus Anne Hawley, shown at a post-theft press conference in a photo from “This Is a Robbery: The World’s Biggest Art Heist” (Courtesy of Netflix)

Abath was never charged with the crime, and the show escapes the dramatic potential to convey the terror that he and his guard mate must have felt that night. (The other guard does not appear and often refuses interviews.) Although chapter two points out a number of peculiarities of the case (such as the disappearance of the duct tape used on the guards), this did not please me. left hanging as I hope to watch serial programs. I rarely want to hold my hand, but at this point it felt necessary.

Chapter Three redeemed that desire with a captivating glimpse into the range of known criminals with Mafia connections who have at one time or another been in the circle of heist suspects. The last chapter narrows down that list. There is a suggestion that in order to resolve this matter the answers must be found among the living. Once again, I found myself wanting something that I’m not used to, a tidier ending like one of those pesky reporter ambush scenes that catch a suspect in his robe, searching for the newspaper. in the morning.

Series director Colin Barnicle, who produced “This Is a Robbery” through his production company he started with his brother Nick Barnicle, told The Berkshire Eagle that he has been working on the series for five or six. year. (The brothers also produced “Billy Joel: New York State of Mind,” a chronicle of the singer’s sold-out shows at Madison Square Garden.) For this series, Barnicle used comments from several current and former Boston Globe reporters. , including Stephen Kurkjian. , who wrote “Master Thieves: The Boston Gangsters Who Pulled Off the World’s Greatest Art Heist” and was a consultant producer on “Last Seen”. Globe’s parent company CEO Linda Pizzuti Henry was executive producer of the Netflix series.

Without making any shocking discoveries, “This Is a Robbery” offers a glimpse into what has happened then and since and may lead some viewers to further research. At this point, the heist has become a staple in Boston lore. As always, Boston can’t shake the lure of its history of white gangsters, especially when Irish and Italian crowds clash or clash with elite institutions. With theories like these in the mix, the Gardner Heist story finds people unwittingly rooted for criminals, or art, or maybe both. We may never know exactly what happened that morning on Palace Road. But the mystery of the heist proved to be both intoxicating and enduring.

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