police officers – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 09:26:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://laprairie-shlm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-2-150x150.png police officers – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ 32 32 LETTERS: The museum is not Disney World; solved the problem | Opinion https://laprairie-shlm.com/letters-the-museum-is-not-disney-world-solved-the-problem-opinion/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/letters-the-museum-is-not-disney-world-solved-the-problem-opinion/ The museum is not Disney World In response to Connor Finley’s December 28 letter regarding his visit to the United States Olympic and Paralympic Museum, I would like to respond. Mr. Finley, I don’t think I know you, but if I did, we might be friends. And as a friend, I should tell you how […]]]>

The museum is not Disney World

In response to Connor Finley’s December 28 letter regarding his visit to the United States Olympic and Paralympic Museum, I would like to respond.

Mr. Finley, I don’t think I know you, but if I did, we might be friends. And as a friend, I should tell you how narrow your take on your visit to this wonderful local attraction was.

What I learned from your letter is that you don’t like spending money on parking; the “games”, as you call them, did not live up to your expectations; and touch screens required you to read 2-3 sentences instead of watching a video. Oh, and the exterior signs asking that no skateboards be practiced on sidewalks (so as not to destroy property or run over customers) was contrary to what you thought was more appropriate.

Having visited the museum three times myself so far, and from what you have written I wonder if your experience could have been any different if first you had parked on the street where you are paying a meter per hour (much less than the $ 39 you ended up paying). Second, if you had read one of the 2-3 sentence descriptions next to one of the beautiful photographs depicting the hundreds of athlete experiences, you might have been inspired instead of so disappointed with “clumsy and banal” virtual tests. After all, it’s not Disney World.

A quote from one of the exhibits expresses the theme of the museum: “Everything about the Olympics is great, especially its values ​​and ideals. The Games bring the world together and reflect a vision of peace, equality, excellence and, above all, the joy of participating.

As the games progressed, their scope widened, both in terms of geography and idealism. And more than all athletics and spectacle, the Olympics produce a spectacularly human feeling. As figure skater Scott Hamilton said: “Most other competitions are individual achievements, but the Olympics are something that belongs to everyone.”

I could go on and mention all the things I learned from my visits. I look forward to a fourth visit so that I can read more of the 2-3 sentence accounts of those who have experienced the joy of participating in the Games.

Joan nusbaum

Colorado springs

Absolutely nailed the problem

Thank you for publishing Glenn Loury’s article in the Sunday Gazette as part of the Benson Center Lecture Series at the University of Colorado at Boulder. This black professor fully understood the black problem in America and its solution. His last paragraph says it better than anything I could do. Here it is again:

“So here is my last unspeakable truth, which I now speak in defiance of ‘culture cancellation’. If we black people want to walk with dignity, if we want to be truly equal, then we have to realize that whites cannot give us equality. We actually need to earn equal status. Please don’t cancel me just yet because I’m on the black side here. But I feel obliged to point out that equality of dignity, equality of status, equality of honor, equality of security in one’s position in society, equality of being able to impose respect for others – it is not something that can just be passed on. Rather, it is something to be wrenched from a cruel and indifferent world with hard, bare-handed work, inspired by the example of our enslaved and newly liberated ancestors. We must make each other equal. No one can do it for us.

Erik Lessing

Monument

The “left madness” continues

The left-wing madness continued in December with the guilty verdict of Jussie Smollett, who created and practiced the hate crime hoax that two guys wearing MAGA hats attacked him and tied him in a noose around the neck.

Let’s not forget Joe Biden and Kamala Harris’ rush to judgment bolstering Smollett’s hate crime hoax while almost simultaneously calling Kyle Rittenhouse a “white supremacist” for his innocent acts of self-defense.

Then Chicago State Attorney Kim Foxx tried to cover up Smollett’s crime and not charge him by telling Smollett’s sister, “Your brother should be fine as long as he stays consistent.” just before a retired judge successfully files the petition as a private citizen to have a special prosecutor assigned to the case. It is shameful how these Democrats try so hard to create lies, divide America on race, and then attempt to cover up their own crimes.

Speaking of tampering with evidence, the Jan.6 committee now admits Congressman Adam Schiff forged text messages and even displayed them onscreen during his statement to create the illusion that councilors and lawmakers of Donald Trump colluded with those in the so-called insurgency on Capitol Hill. . No media outlet wants to mention Antifa organizer John Sullivan, who colluded with CNN in the planned riot on Capitol Hill or the 534 nationwide Antifa riots in 2020. Schiff should be thrown in jail with the rioters of Antifa.

Two Democrats who pushed for “Defund the Police” – one is robbed at gunpoint in Pennsylvania while the other is hijacked in Illinois. And what did they do afterwards? Yes, they called the police they want to reimburse. If you are a Democrat who wants to fund the police, please do not call the police. They are necessary for Americans who appreciate our police officers.

Oh, and by the way, the Chicago Dem’s husband had a gun and used it during the hijacking. Amazing how the same Democrats, who want to ban guns and fund citizen policing, use them for themselves.

A Democratic rights group wants more female models for “greater equality” in model testing, claiming the models are male-dominated.

If you didn’t know any of these stories, there’s a good chance you’re watching “fake news” and that’s just part of the left-wing madness for December 2021.

Franck Aquila

Colorado springs

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The Gardner Museum’s art heist remains a mystery today. Here is a return on the saga. https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-gardner-museums-art-heist-remains-a-mystery-today-here-is-a-return-on-the-saga/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-gardner-museums-art-heist-remains-a-mystery-today-here-is-a-return-on-the-saga/ Here is a return on the unfolding of the saga. Beginning of March 1990: Two weeks before the break-in, a Gardner guard noticed something peculiar on his video screen: a young man being assaulted by two men. He then heard someone, possibly the young one, knocking on the side door of the museum to seek […]]]>

Here is a return on the unfolding of the saga.

Beginning of March 1990: Two weeks before the break-in, a Gardner guard noticed something peculiar on his video screen: a young man being assaulted by two men. He then heard someone, possibly the young one, knocking on the side door of the museum to seek refuge inside. The guard told the young man he would call the police instead.

Before the police arrived, however, all of the men, including the one who was assaulted, jumped into a car and drove off. Investigators wonder if this was the thieves’ first attempt or an attempt.

March 18, 1990: Four people leaving a St. Patrick’s Day party in a building behind the Gardner noticed two men in police uniforms sitting in a car parked outside the museum shortly after midnight.

At 1.24 a.m., a Gardner guard, known to be Richard Abath, opened the door to let in two men dressed as police officers. The men then reportedly handcuffed and taped Abath and another guard before robbing the museum. They smashed the artwork from their frames, leaving behind shards of glass and scraps of canvas.

They also removed the videotape from the recorder that had captured their footage at the museum’s side door as well as elsewhere in the building, before slipping into the empty street after 2:30 a.m. The guards attached to the basement would not be found. until the police are called at 8:15 a.m.

April 1994: The museum received a letter from an anonymous writer who said he could facilitate the return of the paintings in exchange for $ 2.6 million and full immunity from prosecution for thieves and those who held the paintings. . The museum turned over the letter, stamped in New York, to the FBI.

May 1, 1994: The Boston Globe played a role in negotiations with the author of the letter. At the request of the anonymous writer, the Sunday edition of the Globe included the number “1” inserted into the exchange list between the US dollar and the Italian lira.

Matthew V. Storin, editor of The Globe in 1994, said he had been made aware of the contents of the letter and agreed to insert the number – being careful not to make the currency list itself inaccurate – at the request of Richard S. Swensen, the special agent. head of the FBI office in Boston.

“I saw it as a community service decision,” Storin said, adding that he had authorized the move with William O. Taylor, the Globe editor at the time, and made it clear to Swensen that he expected the newspaper to get the first word. if the opening led to the return of the paintings.

A week later, in May 1994: The museum received a second letter from the anonymous writer, alarmed by the aggressive response from law enforcement after the museum received his letter. He wondered if the museum and authorities were interested in recovering the paintings or arresting a low-level middleman.

“YOU CAN’T HAVE BOTH,” he wrote, adding, “Right now I need time to think things over and start the process to ensure the confidentiality of the exchange. “

If he decided that it was impossible to continue negotiating, he wrote, he would provide the museum with clues as to where the paintings were. But he never wrote the museum again.

2010: FBI investigators traveled to Maine to search the home of notorious Boston gangster Robert Guarente, who they say owned some of the artwork before his death in 2004. A search of his farm has nothing given, but Guarente’s wife told officers that before his death, he gave two of the stolen paintings to Gentile.

Gentile denied this, but has now become the subject of the FBI’s investigation.

2012: Authorities searched Gentile’s home in Manchester, Connecticut and found a handwritten list of the stolen paintings and their estimated value, as well as a newspaper article about the museum theft a day after it occurred, as well as ammunition, guns, silencers, explosives and money, prosecutors said.

2013: Gentile was convicted of illegal sale of prescription drugs and possession of firearms, silencers and ammunition.

March 2019: Gentile was released from prison after serving four and a half years. “I had nothing to do with the paintings. It’s a big joke, ”Gentile told The Associated Press at the time.

September 17, 2021: Gentile died at Hartford Hospital from a stroke, his lawyer, Ryan McGuigan, confirmed to The Globe.


Sahar Fatima can be reached at sahar.fatima@globe.com Follow her on Twitter @sahar_fatima.

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Robert Gentile, linked to Gardner museum art theft, dies https://laprairie-shlm.com/robert-gentile-linked-to-gardner-museum-art-theft-dies/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/robert-gentile-linked-to-gardner-museum-art-theft-dies/ Robert Gentile, a mobster who for years denied authorities’ suspicions that he knew anything about a multi-million dollar treasure trove of art that was stolen in a museum heist in 1990 and who is still missing, is deceased. He was 85 years old. His lawyer, Ryan McGuigan, said Gentile died on September 17 from a […]]]>

Robert Gentile, a mobster who for years denied authorities’ suspicions that he knew anything about a multi-million dollar treasure trove of art that was stolen in a museum heist in 1990 and who is still missing, is deceased. He was 85 years old.

His lawyer, Ryan McGuigan, said Gentile died on September 17 from a stroke.

Investigators suspected Gentile of having had in his possession at least some of the works of art taken in March 1990 at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.

In this theft, two men showed up at the museum overnight dressed as police officers. They held back the security guards and left soon after with 13 pieces from the collection, including works by Rembrandt, Vermeer and Degas. Art has never been found.

Gentile, who had an extensive criminal record and served a prison sentence, was suspected of having ties to people suspected of having recovered the art after it was stolen, but denied ever having had any of the works. .

“I had nothing to do with the paintings. It’s a big joke, ”Gentile said in a 2019 telephone interview with The Associated Press after his release from prison.

The authorities did not think so. They said the widow of another gangster said her husband gave Gentile two of the paintings and that Gentile spoke about the stolen labor in prison.

In a search of his home that led to his 2013 conviction for illegal sale of prescription drugs and possession of firearms, silencers and ammunition, prosecutors said federal agents found a handwritten list. stolen paintings and their estimated value, as well as a newspaper article about the museum. heist a day after this happened.

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Gangster linked to Gardner Museum art theft dies of stroke https://laprairie-shlm.com/gangster-linked-to-gardner-museum-art-theft-dies-of-stroke/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/gangster-linked-to-gardner-museum-art-theft-dies-of-stroke/ A mobster who for years denied authorities’ suspicions that he knew anything about a multi-million dollar treasure trove that was stolen in a museum heist in 1990 and is still missing, died. He was 85 years old. His lawyer, Ryan McGuigan, said Robert Gentile died on September 17 from a stroke at the age of […]]]>

A mobster who for years denied authorities’ suspicions that he knew anything about a multi-million dollar treasure trove that was stolen in a museum heist in 1990 and is still missing, died. He was 85 years old.

His lawyer, Ryan McGuigan, said Robert Gentile died on September 17 from a stroke at the age of 85.

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Robert Gentile has passed awayCredit: AP
In this file photo from Thursday, March 11, 2010, empty frames from which thieves took "Storm on the Sea of ​​Galilee," bottom left, by Rembrandt and "The concert," in the foreground on the right, by Vermeer, remain on display at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston

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In this archive photo from Thursday, March 11, 2010, empty frames from where thieves took “Storm over the Sea of ​​Galilee”, left background, by Rembrandt and “The Concert”, right foreground, by Vermeer , remain on display at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in BostonCredit: AP: Associated press

Investigators suspected Gentile of having had in his possession at least some of the works of art taken in March 1990 at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.

In this theft, two men showed up at the museum overnight dressed as police officers.

They held back the security guards and left soon after with 13 pieces from the collection, including works by Rembrandt, Vermeer and Degas.

Art has never been found.

Gentile, who had an extensive criminal record and served a prison sentence, was suspected of having ties to people suspected of recovering the art after it was stolen, but denied ever having had any of the works. .

“I had nothing to do with the paintings. It’s a big joke,” Gentile said in a phone interview with The Associated Press in 2019 after his release from prison.

The authorities did not think so. They said the widow of another gangster said her husband gave Gentile two of the paintings and that Gentile spoke about the stolen labor in prison.

In a search of his home that led to his 2013 conviction for illegal sale of prescription drugs and possession of firearms, silencers and ammunition, prosecutors said federal agents found a handwritten list. stolen paintings and their estimated value, as well as a newspaper article about the museum. heist a day after this happened.

A security guard stands outside the Dutch Room of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, where thieves have stolen more than a dozen works of art by Rembrandt, Vermeer, Degas, Manet and others, during an early morning robbery

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A security guard stands outside the Dutch Room of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, where thieves have stolen more than a dozen works of art by Rembrandt, Vermeer, Degas, Manet and others, during an early morning robberyCredit: AP: Associated press

We pay for your stories!

Do you have a story for the US Sun team?

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Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Art Heist gets another narrative in new Netflix docuseries https://laprairie-shlm.com/isabella-stewart-gardner-museum-art-heist-gets-another-narrative-in-new-netflix-docuseries/ Mon, 05 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/isabella-stewart-gardner-museum-art-heist-gets-another-narrative-in-new-netflix-docuseries/ After more than 30 years, the story of the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum burglary has all the attributes of a spectacular real crime drama. The thief’s disguises, thugs and missing artwork valued at over $ 500 million have captivated and baffled law enforcement, journalists, book authors and podcast hosts. Yet no matter how many people […]]]>

After more than 30 years, the story of the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum burglary has all the attributes of a spectacular real crime drama. The thief’s disguises, thugs and missing artwork valued at over $ 500 million have captivated and baffled law enforcement, journalists, book authors and podcast hosts. Yet no matter how many people look into the facts, the crime remains unsolved.

The new four-part Netflix docuseries “This Is a Robbery: The World’s Biggest Art Heist,” premiering April 7, aren’t expected to be putting anyone behind bars anytime soon. But it will potentially introduce a new audience to the remarkable event and its seemingly endless number of weird characters and rabbit hole theories. Aside from getting an entertaining fix and then spending the night, the hope of another Gardner tale, one presumes, is that the show could finally get someone who knows something to talk.

Told in four “chapters” of over 50 minutes, the first tells the story of the crime through a combination of dramatization, archival photographs, television news footage and ongoing interviews. At a minimum, the visual juxtaposition of yesterday and today serves as a brutal reminder of the time that has passed. The people originally involved in the case have retired; suspects were murdered or died of natural causes. Even the boxy cars and clunky technology (convincingly portrayed in the scenes staged by the Berkshire Theater Group) suggest it’s time to pass the torch to a new generation of detectives who are getting closer with each passing year.

The series opens with witnesses who say they saw two men dressed as Boston police officers sitting in a hatchback on Palace Road just outside the museum in the wee hours of March 18, 1990. A scene recreated shows the “officers” entered by telling museum security guard Richard Abath that they were investigating a disturbance. After handcuffing and blindfolding Abath and another guard, the thieves moved between the galleries for over an hour, littering the floor with shattered glass and emptying the gilded frames. A total of 13 pieces left the venue that night, including Rembrandt’s unique Seascape (“Christ in the Storm on the Sea of ​​Galilee”) and a Vermeer (“The Concert”), precious for its stunning sound. use of light and the limited number of his paintings in circulation.

While the first chapter drops several suspicious seeds to nurture later in the series, it does so impartially, without the thrilling music or tacky storytelling that makes other true crime dramas feel forced (strangely, both appear in the trailer). Instead, and preferably, it allows interviewees to showcase the museum’s intimidating Italian palace-inspired architecture, the incomparably arranged collection and the mastermind behind it, Isabella Stewart Gardner. Other reports on the heists, such as WBUR and The Boston Globe’s in depth Last seen podcast of 2018, gave him the same respect.

After a year without an actual gallery tour, seeing the interior of the museum was surprisingly poignant. So is Anne Hawley, former director of the Gardner and lead interviewee who recaps the crime and briefly points out that she is the first woman to oversee the world-class museum. She took the reins just six months before the heist, and footage likely taken the following morning shows her in shock. What a plate she was served and what a life she gave to the Gardner during her 25-year tenure.

Not all true crime aficionados will patiently wait for the juiciest stuff from who did it and why. The second chapter gets bogged down in an attempt to explore the vulnerabilities of the museum and the more obvious theory that, like the majority of art thefts, this was internal work. For this reason, Abath always has sidelong glances. (Okay, he would go to work stoned sometimes, and photos from that night show him with long, curly hair, a tie-dyed t-shirt and a fanny pack, ready to attend a Grateful Dead concert.) former colleague Net describes him as the “type of hippie who’s good at chess,” a combo as overwhelming as the one who let thieves in. The series spices up with absurd humor.

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Director Emeritus Anne Hawley, shown at a post-theft press conference in a photo from “This Is a Robbery: The World’s Biggest Art Heist” (Courtesy of Netflix)

Abath was never charged with the crime, and the show escapes the dramatic potential to convey the terror that he and his guard mate must have felt that night. (The other guard does not appear and often refuses interviews.) Although chapter two points out a number of peculiarities of the case (such as the disappearance of the duct tape used on the guards), this did not please me. left hanging as I hope to watch serial programs. I rarely want to hold my hand, but at this point it felt necessary.

Chapter Three redeemed that desire with a captivating glimpse into the range of known criminals with Mafia connections who have at one time or another been in the circle of heist suspects. The last chapter narrows down that list. There is a suggestion that in order to resolve this matter the answers must be found among the living. Once again, I found myself wanting something that I’m not used to, a tidier ending like one of those pesky reporter ambush scenes that catch a suspect in his robe, searching for the newspaper. in the morning.

Series director Colin Barnicle, who produced “This Is a Robbery” through his production company he started with his brother Nick Barnicle, told The Berkshire Eagle that he has been working on the series for five or six. year. (The brothers also produced “Billy Joel: New York State of Mind,” a chronicle of the singer’s sold-out shows at Madison Square Garden.) For this series, Barnicle used comments from several current and former Boston Globe reporters. , including Stephen Kurkjian. , who wrote “Master Thieves: The Boston Gangsters Who Pulled Off the World’s Greatest Art Heist” and was a consultant producer on “Last Seen”. Globe’s parent company CEO Linda Pizzuti Henry was executive producer of the Netflix series.

Without making any shocking discoveries, “This Is a Robbery” offers a glimpse into what has happened then and since and may lead some viewers to further research. At this point, the heist has become a staple in Boston lore. As always, Boston can’t shake the lure of its history of white gangsters, especially when Irish and Italian crowds clash or clash with elite institutions. With theories like these in the mix, the Gardner Heist story finds people unwittingly rooted for criminals, or art, or maybe both. We may never know exactly what happened that morning on Palace Road. But the mystery of the heist proved to be both intoxicating and enduring.

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The Gardner Museum Art Theft Netflix 1990 Series Features Set And Actors From The Berkshire Theater Group | Local news https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-gardner-museum-art-theft-netflix-1990-series-features-set-and-actors-from-the-berkshire-theater-group-local-news/ Sun, 28 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-gardner-museum-art-theft-netflix-1990-series-features-set-and-actors-from-the-berkshire-theater-group-local-news/ PITTSFIELD – “! SOMEONE IS IN THE DUTCH BEDROOM. INQUIRY IMMEDIATELY !!. ” A matrix printer spat out the silent alarm repeatedly in the wee hours of March 18, 1990. The alarm went unanswered. The biggest art theft in US history was taking place; Security guards were handcuffed and tied with duct tape in the […]]]>

PITTSFIELD – “! SOMEONE IS IN THE DUTCH BEDROOM. INQUIRY IMMEDIATELY !!. ”

A matrix printer spat out the silent alarm repeatedly in the wee hours of March 18, 1990. The alarm went unanswered. The biggest art theft in US history was taking place; Security guards were handcuffed and tied with duct tape in the basement of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.

The robbery would have lasted 81 minutes; 13 works of art worth $ 500 million were taken. Among the stolen items were “Christ in the Storm on the Sea of ​​Galilee”, the only known seascape painted by Rembrandt, and “The Concert”, one of Johannes Vermeer’s 36 paintings.

Art has never been recovered. Top FBI suspects George Reissfelder and Lenny DiMuzio both died within a year of the robbery. The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum continues to offer a $ 10 million reward for information leading to the return of items.

The art theft, the resulting investigation, as well as the network of theories regarding the location of the artwork and possible links to Whitey Bulger, the Boston Mafia and the IRA are at the center of ‘a new four-part Netflix docusery, “This is Robbery: The World’s Biggest Art Heist,” which hits the streaming service on April 7.

“I think everyone in Massachusetts knows there was a theft, but not exactly what happened,” director Colin Barnicle said in a phone interview with The Eagle. “I always thought it was a ‘Thomas Crown Affair’ type heist.”

The real crime docuseries are a first for Barnicle and his brother, Nick Barnicle, who is one of the show’s producers. Their production company, Barnicle Brothers Inc., is best known for its sports and music documentaries, including Emmy Award-winning Billy Joel: New York State of Mind.

“It was a slow process,” said Colin Barnicle. “Songs were shot as early as 2016. It took five or six years to get to that point.”

After years of research, court visits, stalking former Gardner Museum employees, and interviewing, production was ready to begin its final filming phase in early 2020. As COVID-19 began to spread across the world, it became imperative that the production find places to film its evocations (reconstructions).

“We were four years in the production before shooting these scenes; apart from what we needed to shoot in Boston, we needed a controllable area to shoot. There aren’t many places like that in the northeast, ”he said.

Barnicle turned to associate producer Alex Hill for help. Hill, in turn, contacted his mother, Kate Maguire, artistic director and CEO of the Berkshire Theater Group.

“This series wouldn’t have happened without the help of the Berkshire Theater Group,” Barnicle said. “They took the ball and ran with it. Every evocation that didn’t take place at the Gardner Museum was filmed in the Berkshires on the Berkshire Theater Group campus. Their team built all the sets, making sure the actual proportions were correct. They provided the wardrobe, the lighting, the cast for the lead roles and even the additional roles.






On the spot: it's a theft

The Netflix docuseries, “This is a Robbery,” filmed scenes at various locations around the Berkshires, including locations inside and behind the Colonial Theater in Pittsfield. Other locations included the Berkshire Museum and the Unicorn Theater.




Filming in the Berkshires took place in mid-February 2020, just weeks before Governor Charlie Baker shut down most of Massachusetts due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Working with the Barnicle brothers was a dream come true for the Berkshire Theater Group. We were able to use each of our campuses, build sets, provide technical support, bring in local actors and work with a really creative and professional team led by director Colin Barnicle, ”Maguire said in an email.

Actor Chris Vecchia, who has worked with BTG for the past decade and last appeared in “A Christmas Carol” in 2019 portrayed Reissfelder, one of the two men, according to the FBI, was able to enter. in the Gardner Museum pretending to be police officers. The other thief, DiMuzo, was played by BTG actor Joshua Bishoff.

“At the Unicorn Theater, the whole stage has been turned into an office. Standing on stage, you always had that theatrical vibe. It’s amazing how different he is through the eye of the camera. It looked like an entirely different scene, ”Vecchia said, adding that another scene had been turned into Reissfelder’s apartment, where he allegedly hung one of Manet’s stolen paintings on his wall.

Vecchia also spent time filming in the basement of the Colonial Theater, where BTG actor Brandon Lee, as security guard Rick Abath, was handcuffed and tied with duct tape.

“Rick is the guy who went down in history as the man who let the thieves in. It’s a weird series of weird decisions, at least for Rick – assuming he’s not involved – who led to him being tied up in the basement, ”said Lee, who appeared on“ Godspell ”last summer. “I spent most of my day in handcuffs and duct tape. They used double sided tape so that they could stick it around my head and not stick it to my wig or my face. Because of the duct tape, I could only see with the lower third of my field of vision in a dark, handcuffed basement. It was definitely one of the strangest days of working as an actor. “

Vecchia also spent time filming in Boston; filming outside the Gardner Museum and driving through the streets of Boston.

“When we were in Boston the street we were turning on was closed. I was playing a thief disguised as a Boston police officer, so I had a uniform,” he said. “During a break, I was standing at the end of the street, when a policeman approached the traffic light on the corner. He looked at me and gave me a professional nod. That’s how good this production was. professional; everything I wore right down to the hat and badge was so authentic that a real police officer thought I was an officer on the set.






This is a theft

Associate producer Alex Hill adjusts the focus of a camera on the set of “This is A Robbery”. Brandon Lee (seated) plays Rick Abath, the Guardian on Duty on the Night of Art Theft. Also pictured (second from right) Shawn Ryder, grip, and Jeff Siegel, producer, who plays the role of police officer.




The time spent filming in the Berkshires – around 20 setups – allowed the docuseries to complete filming before parts of the country found themselves in a pandemic-induced lockdown, Barnicle said.

So what can viewers expect from the docuseries?

“We have decided to keep it simple and enjoyable for everyone, especially those who hear about this crime for the first time. We wanted to give an accurate overview of the crime scene and what was going on there, ”Barnicle said.

Because of that goal, he said about 90 percent of the searches done do not appear in the series.

“We had four episodes to work on. We needed a beginning, a middle and an end for an unsolved and untried case without a written record, ”Barnicle said. “Everyone has a theory as to what happened.”

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Netflix Series Looks At Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Art Theft https://laprairie-shlm.com/netflix-series-looks-at-isabella-stewart-gardner-museum-art-theft/ Thu, 11 Mar 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/netflix-series-looks-at-isabella-stewart-gardner-museum-art-theft/ It’s the world’s most infamous art theft, an unsolved mystery that for the past three decades has inspired articles, newsletters, books, documentaries, podcasts and even artistic projects. Now the 1990 theft of 13 works of art from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is getting the Netflix treatment:It’s a flighta four-part documentary series created by Boston-area […]]]>

It’s the world’s most infamous art theft, an unsolved mystery that for the past three decades has inspired articles, newsletters, books, documentaries, podcasts and even artistic projects.

Now the 1990 theft of 13 works of art from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is getting the Netflix treatment:It’s a flighta four-part documentary series created by Boston-area natives Nick and Colin Barnicle.

The project, which kicks off on April 7, took years to prepare, as the Barnicle brothers searched for legal documents, sifted through 30 years of leads and persuaded sources to sit down for interviews on camera.

Director Colin Barnicle said that although they checked “every possible theory”, most of this research does not appear on screen.

“We were trying to make a roadmap, but not one where you can go off on 18 different exit ramps,” he said. Rather, they wanted to show “the most likely flare of what happened that night and in the first year after the crime.”

However, the question remained: how to shed new light on the Gardner heist, the great white whale of artistic crime, in which two thieves disguised as police officers stole works by Rembrandt, Degas and Vermeer in the early hours of March 18, 1990?

“We wanted to take the viewer through this as if it were happening at that moment,” Colin Barnicle said. “They all have the ups and downs of getting closer to discovering art. You get really high and then you come crashing down because it’s like it’s slipping through your fingers.

The documentary series is a first for the Barnicle brothers in more ways than one. The brothers (sons of journalist and former Boston Globe columnist Mike Barnicle) are best known for producing sports and music films, including the New York Emmy Award-winning “Billy Joel: New York State of Mind.”

Filmmakers Nick and Colin Barnicle.Noa Griffel

It’s also their first Netflix project and their first collaboration with executive producers Jane Rosenthal and Berry Welsh. Linda Pizzuti Henry, managing director of Boston Globe Media Partners, parent company of the Boston Globe, is also executive producing the project.

But Nick Barnicle, who along with his brother is listed as executive producer, said they had been working on the documentary for so long that it no longer felt like new ground.

“Even though we were sort of known as the sports-doc guys, we were still working on that on the side,” Nick Barnicle said. “We’ve always been interested in that.”

Colin Barnicle said the series builds on the work of previous investigators who “laid the groundwork” and includes interviews with a number of current and former Globe journalists, crime investigators, museum workers and others associated with the case.

Nonetheless, the brothers say they’ve also uncovered some tantalizing new clues.

“Even if you’ve read all the books, if you’ve listened to anything on them, there will be new stuff in there,” Colin Barnicle said. “And we come to a conclusion.”

“The Concert” by Johannes Vermeer, one of the works stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in 1990.Reuters

So who did it?

“It’s a case that lends itself to a lot of mystery,” Colin Barnicle said. “I would say that we identify the people who entered the museum.”

The Federal Bureau of Investigation made a similar claim in 2013, when he announced he had identified the thieves, but declined to name them, citing the ongoing investigation. Yet there were never any arrests and the location of the art, valued at $500 million, remains a mystery despite a $10 million reward.

The brothers describe the series as a treasure map, giving viewers powerful clues and insight into what happened that terrible night in the Fenway 31 years ago.

“I think we’re shining the brightest light possible on every detail,” said Nick Barnicle, who said he hopes Netflix’s massive reach can help solve the crime. “At the end of the fourth episode, you have so many different details at your disposal… who knows?


Malcolm Gay can be contacted at malcolm.gay@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter at @malcolmgay.

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