social media – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 15:38:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://laprairie-shlm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-2-150x150.png social media – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ 32 32 Lack of Jewish heritage at LA’s Academy Museum of Motion Pictures sparks outcry https://laprairie-shlm.com/lack-of-jewish-heritage-at-las-academy-museum-of-motion-pictures-sparks-outcry/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 10:37:31 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/lack-of-jewish-heritage-at-las-academy-museum-of-motion-pictures-sparks-outcry/ The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles, which aims to dedicate a century of cinema to Hollywood, has come under criticism for its exhibits excluding Jewish filmmakers who played a key role in launching the industry. Donors and influential members of the academy have complained that there is no mention of the mostly […]]]>

The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles, which aims to dedicate a century of cinema to Hollywood, has come under criticism for its exhibits excluding Jewish filmmakers who played a key role in launching the industry.

Donors and influential members of the academy have complained that there is no mention of the mostly immigrant Jews who established the industry after escaping persecution in their homelands., reports Rolling Stone magazine.

Some customers have threatened to withdraw support over the issue, sources familiar with the developments told the magazine in a published report Thusday.

The museum opened on September 25 last year with a star-studded event, but already then some were wondering what was missing from the exhibits.

Anti-Defamation League CEO Jonathan Greenblatt, who was at the opening of the gala, told the magazine of his disappointment at what he felt was a “glaring omission”.

“As I was walking, I literally turned to the person I was with and said, ‘Where are the Jews?’ “, he said.

“I would have hoped that any honest historical assessment of the film industry — its origins, its development, its growth — would include the role Jews played in building the industry from the ground up,” Greenblatt said.

Illustrative: Anti-Defamation League CEO Jonathan Greenblatt speaks at the group’s 2018 National Leadership Summit in Washington, DC. (Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images/JTA)

The absence was noted by various outlets, drawing criticism from The Forward, Air Mail and Bari Weiss’ Common Sense website on the Substack platform.

However, a source familiar with the museum’s lineup told Rolling Stone that there was not enough pressure from influential figures to include Jews.

“A lot of people who could have fought harder for Jewish representation were just very low,” the anonymous source said.

“It’s a conspiracy of silence and it’s deeply upsetting,” Greenblatt said.

“By not including the founding fathers, they were making a massive statement,” said academy member and film financier Ryan Kavanaugh. “As grandsons of Holocaust survivors, it’s just shocking that they erased contributions from a group facing severe anti-Semitism – they couldn’t get bank loans, they couldn’t own houses in Los Angeles, and yet they still created this industry that is the foundation of the economy of Los Angeles and touches people all over the world.”

“Instead of, ‘Look what they were able to do,’ it’s just wiped out,” complained Kavanaugh, who founded Triller, a video-sharing social media network. “It goes against everything our industry says they stand for.”

The museum’s exhibits after it opened tended to focus on more contemporary figures, with one member of the academy saying it made it seem like “the film industry was created 10 years ago. They erased the past. And I find that appalling. »

Haim Saban speaks at the unveiling of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures’ Saban Building event at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles on Dec. 4, 2018. (Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP)

Haim Saban, whose $50 million contribution to the museum was the largest donation, said he and his wife Cheryl have spoken with museum management and take their comments “seriously”.

The Sabans “strongly believe that Jewish contributions to the film industry from its founding to the present day should be showcased,” he said.

Others defended the museum, saying it couldn’t showcase 100 years of history on its opening night.

“We didn’t come to opening night with the origin story, but we came to opening night with what was relevant to the audience we were playing and needed to include,” said Sid Ganis, Honorary Administrator. “I have friends who said to me, ‘Where are the Jews?’ It’s in the eyes of the beholder. They are here, and they will be there in a bigger and more visible way very soon. »

So far, more than 290,000 people have purchased tickets to the museum on Wilshire Boulevard, including film industry veterans. Museum director and president Bill Kramer said the administration was attentive to the comments.

“I’ve had interviews with four Academy members and two donors who wanted to better understand why they weren’t seeing an exhibit about Hollywood’s predominately Jewish founders, and we take that note very seriously,” he said. -he declares. “Representation is so important to us, including our Jewish founders. If we don’t talk about it in enough detail or in a more obvious way, we want to hear it and we want to respond to it. We have heard these notes, and we understand. And we are really happy to be able to make a change and we will correct our trajectory.

Screen capture from video of Director and President of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Bill Kramer, March 2021. (YouTube)

The museum is planning a new exhibit for next year that will focus on Hollywood’s founding fathers, he said. Initially planned as a temporary element, it will become a permanent exhibition following complaints.

Additionally, a six-week film series, “Vienna to Hollywood: Emigrants and Exiles in the Studio System,” launched in December, features mostly Jewish filmmakers, a move Saban welcomed.

“We have no doubt that as the museum’s dynamic exhibits continue to rotate, Jewish contributions will continue to be represented among the many important stories about film history, art and artists,” he said. -he declares.

Are you serious. We appreciate that!

That’s why we come to work every day – to provide discerning readers like you with unmissable coverage of Israel and the Jewish world.

So now we have a request. Unlike other media, we don’t have a paywall in place. But since the journalism we do is expensive, we invite readers to whom The Times of Israel has become important to support our work by joining The Times of Israel community.

For just $6 a month, you can help support our quality journalism while benefiting from The Times of Israel WITHOUT ADVERTISING, as well as access to exclusive content available only to members of the Times of Israel community.

Join our community

Join our community

Already a member? Log in to stop seeing this

]]>
Turkish influencer convicted of posing with penis sculpture at Amsterdam sex museum https://laprairie-shlm.com/turkish-influencer-convicted-of-posing-with-penis-sculpture-at-amsterdam-sex-museum/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 18:34:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/turkish-influencer-convicted-of-posing-with-penis-sculpture-at-amsterdam-sex-museum/ A Turkish social media influencer was reportedly given a five-month suspended prison sentence for breaking obscenity laws in her country after posing with a giant penis at Amsterdam’s famous Sex Museum. Merve Taskin, 23, who has around 573,000 Instagram followers, used the site to share pictures of sex toys she bought at the museum during […]]]>

A Turkish social media influencer was reportedly given a five-month suspended prison sentence for breaking obscenity laws in her country after posing with a giant penis at Amsterdam’s famous Sex Museum.

Merve Taskin, 23, who has around 573,000 Instagram followers, used the site to share pictures of sex toys she bought at the museum during a birthday trip to the Netherlands in January 2020.

In one striking image, the daring brunette is seen straddling the massive member as she sits on a pair of gargantuan gonads.

Other images she posted included penis-shaped pasta, a “sexy bottle opener” and a snap of her standing behind a door designed after a brothel in the Dutch capital’s famous red light district. .

While Taskin deemed the pictures innocent enough, the Turkish authorities took offense and slapped her with the charges under article 226 of the penal code relating to the obscenity of her country.

Under Turkish law, Taskin faced up to three years in prison, but was given a five-month suspended sentence, not so harsh, the Daily Star reported.

She wrote on her Instagram page that the phrase means “if I do not willfully commit a crime within five years, the provision will be rescinded with all its consequences.”

Merve Taskin was given a five-month suspended prison sentence for breaking obscenity laws in Amsterdam after posting a video of her posing with a giant penis at the Amsterdam Sex Museum.
Newsflash

“Against the advice, we said that, in general, my messages are within the limits of freedom of expression, that there is no precedent in the world, and that this concrete situation does not mean not that our investigative authority is carrying out an investigation that will set an example for the world, but that it shows how far behind the world we are in terms of freedom of expression, ”she added in the message, according to a translation from Turkish.

“However, the court didn’t agree with us, so they sentenced me to five months in prison,” Taskin said.

Museum director Monique van Marle said after sentencing that the installation “is meant to educate people around the world about the history of sex.

The Turkish authorities claim that Merve Taskin violated article 226 of the penal code relating to the obscenity of the country.
The Turkish authorities claim that Merve Taskin violated article 226 of the penal code relating to the obscenity of the country.
Instagram

“We admire you for expressing yourself and posting such photos,” she added, told the Daily Star.

Human rights groups have said freedom of expression online has taken a hit in Turkey under President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s government.

Turkey “remains one of the most difficult places in the European region to exercise your right to freedom of speech and expression,” according to Freedom House, a nonprofit group that conducts research and advocacy on the issue. democracy, political freedom and human rights.

]]>
Catawba College Business Students Check NC Museum Of Dolls, Toys & Miniatures – Salisbury Post https://laprairie-shlm.com/catawba-college-business-students-check-nc-museum-of-dolls-toys-miniatures-salisbury-post/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 05:12:10 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/catawba-college-business-students-check-nc-museum-of-dolls-toys-miniatures-salisbury-post/ During the fall semester, the NC Museum of Dolls, Toys & Miniatures collaborated with three different classes at the Ralph W. Ketner School of Business at Catawba College – Introduction to Entrepreneurship, Marketing Research, and Course Marketing Management. MBA, courses taught by Dr Jeremiah Nelson and Dr Jennifer Yurchisin. “The students had so many great […]]]>

During the fall semester, the NC Museum of Dolls, Toys & Miniatures collaborated with three different classes at the Ralph W. Ketner School of Business at Catawba College – Introduction to Entrepreneurship, Marketing Research, and Course Marketing Management. MBA, courses taught by Dr Jeremiah Nelson and Dr Jennifer Yurchisin.

“The students had so many great ideas,” said Beth Nance, executive director of the museum, following the business plan presentations at the end of the semester in Nelson’s introduction to entrepreneurship.

Located in Spencer, the museum offers visitors exhibits ranging from antique dolls and toys to contemporary childhood favorites. After visiting the museum at the start of the semester, the students noticed that the museum really has something for everyone, not just keen collectors or little kids. There is clearly a lot of untapped potential to expand audiences to increase visitor traffic.

Groups of students highlighted combinations of operational tactics, partnership ideas, and marketing strategies that they believed would positively impact the visitor experience or generate new interest in visitors. One team suggested “pop-up” exhibits in stores, community centers and even other museums to raise awareness at no cost to potentially a very specific audience. Several groups highlighted the opportunities of social media advertising as it is very economical and can be highly targeted depending on demographics. Additionally, the potential for free engagement with different groups using hashtags would help raise awareness among niche enthusiasts. One student pointed out that many Tiktok posts with #thumbnails have over a million views.

The entrepreneurship students were really excited about the project. McKenzie Webster, a junior specializing in biology, found developing the business plan an exciting challenge. She explained that “trying to find a way for the museum to improve without losing its character was the top priority of my group”. Marko Sudar, a first year computer science student, agreed. He observed, “It was a really exciting trip and my group was really happy to be a part of it. Finding what is special about the museum and exploring the ways it can stand out among museums and other entertainment options challenged us to apply what we have learned in the classroom.

“I think working with a real client and having the opportunity to develop a business plan for a real company has been a unique and overall amazing experience,” said Harmony Speer, second year student at Catawba College majoring in business administration and sociology. “We took what we learned in the classroom and applied it to a real-life situation at the time. This experience was one of a kind and a great learning experience that went well with the topics covered in class.

In Yurchisin’s Marketing Management course, students identified target markets and performed a SWOT analysis of the museum, developing a list of suggested promotional materials and activities. In their undergraduate marketing research course, a group of students completed a demographic and psychographic profile of museum visitors.

Dr Eric Hake, Dean of the Ketner School of Business, said: “Each semester, professors at the Ralph W. Ketner School of Business collaborate with local businesses to coordinate classroom research to meet the needs of our students. and our community. Project-based learning is an important complement to individualized company internships, both of which integrate classroom theory with practical applications.

To explore ways you can work with business students and faculty at Catawba College, contact Dr. Eric Hake at erhake@catawba.edu.

]]>
Protest is personal in Joshua Rashaad McFadden’s Eastman Museum Art Exhibition | Art https://laprairie-shlm.com/protest-is-personal-in-joshua-rashaad-mcfaddens-eastman-museum-art-exhibition-art/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 16:41:15 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/protest-is-personal-in-joshua-rashaad-mcfaddens-eastman-museum-art-exhibition-art/ As a photographer and curator, it is rare that an art exhibition makes me cry. But that’s exactly what happened with “Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On,” a retrospective photography exhibition at the George Eastman Museum. The dark walls and subdued lights of the gallery space attracted me. At the entrance to the […]]]>

As a photographer and curator, it is rare that an art exhibition makes me cry. But that’s exactly what happened with “Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On,” a retrospective photography exhibition at the George Eastman Museum.

The dark walls and subdued lights of the gallery space attracted me. At the entrance to the exhibition is a mirror with the words “BE REAL BLACK FOR ME”.

This imperative served two purposes: to welcome black spectators to a museum that caters to predominantly white artists for predominantly white audiences, and to challenge white spectators to change their mindset. It was a daring, even radical, statement affirming the right presence of black art in a museum setting.

It’s also rare for an artist as young as Joshua Rashaad McFadden – he’s only 31 – to receive a retrospective so early in his career at a gallery like the George Eastman Museum, which tends to recognize artists with portfolios. more extensive.

Click to enlarge

  • PHOTO BY ERICH CAMPING
  • Joshua Rashaad McFadden mingles with attendees from the George Eastman Museum at the opening reception for the photo retrospective “Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On”.

“Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On” is a stunning look at one of contemporary photography’s most provocative black artists, who also happens to be a native of Rochester. The exhibit is on view at the Eastman Museum until June 19.

I started following McFadden’s work during the 2020 social uprising in Rochester following the murder of Daniel Prude. I was obsessively refreshing social media pages, watching pictures and videos of friends and family in the Rochester Police Department tear gas and pepperball assault. McFadden was on the front lines, documenting interactions between protesters and police with live video clips and photographs, and capturing both the astonishing violence and the uplifting response from the community.

“I had to go and document this no matter what,” McFadden said. “I had to do it.”

Click to enlarge
"Irony of Black Policeman (Atlanta, Georgia), 2020, from "Troubles in America: Rayshard Brooks." - PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN

  • PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN
  • “Irony of Black Policeman (Atlanta, GA), 2020, from” Unrest in America: Rayshard Brooks “.

McFadden has a lot on his plate, creatively. He had already started teaching at RIT when he began documenting the protests in Rochester. He also covered similar protests in Minneapolis, Atlanta and Washington, DC.

“With this kind of work, no, there is no sleep,” he explained. “The protests took place all day and in the middle of the night until 4 am. So, (I) slept two hours a night all summer, really until this year, because Derek Chauvin’s trial happened this year in April.

“He worked without sleep for a long, long, long time. But the job had to be done.

In the protest photography genre, McFadden’s work often captures the unfiltered emotional responses of protesters.

For McFadden, capturing black grief is only a small part of capturing black life. He considers his projects individually, but admits that because the works sometimes overlap, the images and their stories begin to inform.

Click to enlarge
"I relate directly to the plight of black Americans who experience racism in this country," McFadden said. "And so, going out and documenting it was very difficult.  And you will see the intense emotion of the photograph." - PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN

  • PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN
  • “I am directly linked to the plight of black Americans who experience racism in this country,” McFadden said. “And so, going out and documenting that was very difficult. And you will see the intense emotion of the photograph.”

McFadden returned to Rochester in 2018 after several years in Atlanta, where he taught photography at Spelman College, to accept an art residency at the Visual Studies Workshop. He currently teaches at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

From there, he produced “Evidence,” an exhibition that illustrates the breadth of black masculinity and gender through portraits of men alongside those of their fathers or father figures. At the same time, McFadden was motivated by the recent death of his grandfather and produced “Love Without Justice,” an autobiographical photo series that used photos from his family’s archives.

Click to enlarge
PHOTO BY ERICH CAMPING

In his portraits of other people, there is a rawness and a desire for deep self-exploration. “I think the job is really me,” he said. “And it’s not really too glamorous or staged. Especially with the archives, it’s very personal. Especially in ‘Love without justice’. I just add to the archive. So I think it’s me, for sure. Completely unfiltered.

McFadden says his personal experience also motivates his photojournalism work.

“Along with other things, like ‘Unrest in America’, and documenting protests across the country, it’s also very personal. I’m directly linked to the plight of black Americans who experience racism in this country,” a- he said. “And so, going out and documenting it was very difficult. And you will see the intense emotion of the photograph. And it is not only because it is a touching moment, but you will see my emotion. in these photographs.

Click to enlarge
"I can't breathe: Minneapolis, Minnesota," 2020, from "Troubles in America: George Floyd." - PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN

  • PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN
  • “I Can’t Breathe: Minneapolis, Minnesota,” 2020, from “Unrest in America: George Floyd”.

Exploring the self through the chronicle of black life more broadly has been a constant theme of McFadden’s career.

“It always comes down to this constant referencing image map of itself,” said K. Anthony Jones, art critic and McFadden collaborator. “It becomes self-referential throughout this whole loop. “

“He’s exploring what it means not to have a home in this place,” Jones later said.

Eastman Museum executive director Bruce Barnes acknowledged this in his remarks at the opening of “I Believe I’ll Run On,” saying the exhibit “chronicles the intimacy of black life in the United States. And was “a testament to healing and the protective possibilities of turning in on oneself.”

McFadden wanted his work to elicit a visceral response, the kind of real response that, as he put it, was “unfiltered by the institution in which it exists.”

Click to enlarge
PHOTO BY JASON MILTON

Museums are spaces for ritual practice, housing objects and artefacts revered by the community that supports them. McFadden’s exhibition plays on this, with lighting and colors that incite an almost holy exaltation of the work. Watching exhibit attendees engage in different ways reminded me of the difference between going to church in New York City with my white mother and going to church in South Carolina with my black father: solemn silence versus jubilant reverence.

It is rare that we are able to gift their flowers to artists while they are still in business and even more exceptional when we are able to do so near the start of what appears to be on the way to a meteoric career.

“This is just the start,” McFadden said. “I have so much more work to do and so much more to say.”

Amanda Chestnut is a freelance writer for CITY. Comments on this article can be directed to dkushner@rochester-citynews.com.

click on the picture
champion-story-banner.gif

]]>
Phillip K. Smith III Wins 2022 Honor at Palm Springs Art Museum Art Party https://laprairie-shlm.com/phillip-k-smith-iii-wins-2022-honor-at-palm-springs-art-museum-art-party/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/phillip-k-smith-iii-wins-2022-honor-at-palm-springs-art-museum-art-party/ The roots of Lightworks go back to Opening, his first light-based installation, premiered in 2010 while he was the artist in residence at the Palm Springs Art Museum. “Much of my early work dealt directly with light and shadow, often working in monochromatic fashion,” says Smith. “It was only after Opening that I really took […]]]>

The roots of Lightworks go back to Opening, his first light-based installation, premiered in 2010 while he was the artist in residence at the Palm Springs Art Museum. “Much of my early work dealt directly with light and shadow, often working in monochromatic fashion,” says Smith. “It was only after Opening that I really took the color straight away.

Opening and a mirror-polished stainless steel sculpture he created for a site in Oklahoma City signaled the coming of Smith’s seminal work, Lucid stability, which would make his High Desert property a social media sensation.

This magical moment

In 2013, Smith, who is married to Modernism Week executive director Lisa Vossler Smith, decided to “do something” with his High Desert cabin. In the studio, he began experimenting with photographs of the dilapidated structure and creating the first renderings of what would become Lucid stability. “I believe in the brewing process,” he says. “I haven’t drawn on this thing for eight years, and then one day it was like, boom, It was there.

Lucid stability has come to life as an ephemeral monument in the light of the desert – a weathered wooden shelter with polished mirrors replacing the door, windows and any other horizontal beams to reflect the surrounding landscape by day and to project fields of color at night.

“These are four ideas: light and shadow (the interaction with the sun), reflected light, projected light and change,” says Smith, his head buzzing showing a hint of gray. “It varies considerably from sunrise to 9:00 am, noon, 3:00 pm, dusk and into the late evening. At dusk, there is the reflection of the sun inside as the windows and door slowly move through the LED-powered color wheel. The projected light comes from inside and reveals the structure – the two-by-fours, the diagonal bracing – like lines of light that wrap around the cabin. The four windows and the door, you are not fully aware that they are changing. It’s about slowing down, stopping, and being quiet so you can see and listen.

]]>
TikTok star Zach King hilariously demonstrates how museum art will be displayed in times of Covid-19 https://laprairie-shlm.com/tiktok-star-zach-king-hilariously-demonstrates-how-museum-art-will-be-displayed-in-times-of-covid-19/ Tue, 18 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/tiktok-star-zach-king-hilariously-demonstrates-how-museum-art-will-be-displayed-in-times-of-covid-19/ While few parts of the world are slowly returning to some sort of normalcy, others are still dealing with the raging COVID-19 pandemic. Wearing masks, disinfecting and social distancing have become the new norm. TikTok star and internet personality Zach King has once again amused internet users with a creative new offering that shows how […]]]>

While few parts of the world are slowly returning to some sort of normalcy, others are still dealing with the raging COVID-19 pandemic. Wearing masks, disinfecting and social distancing have become the new norm. TikTok star and internet personality Zach King has once again amused internet users with a creative new offering that shows how museums would be amid the ongoing pandemic. The 31-year-old has a cult following on the social media circuits and was recently confirmed to have the most followers on TikTok. King has over 58.2 million on the platform alone.

King’s new music video shows how the work of famous artists would be displayed in museums this year. The 24-second clip shared on his official Twitter account shows him taking on the role of a museum staff member. “Alright everyone, the museum is getting into Covid compliance. You must wear masks at all times,” the 24-second video can be heard saying as he hands out face masks to all of the characters in the famous paintings displayed on the wall.” This is van Gogh,” he adds, giving the Dutch painter a mask. The music video finally ends with King switching to the “The Last Supper” setting and saying, “Guy, come on, there is no indoor dining” (social distancing) as the characters in the painting begin to exit. It ends with King saying, “Judas, I’m looking at you”.

Watch the hilarious clip here:

The funny clip garnered over 1.6 million views in no time on the microblogging site. Amused by the video, netizens flocked to the comments section to voice their reactions.

Appreciating King’s new video, “I love this type of content,” wrote one user.

Another user posted a few images of other famous paintings wearing face masks and replied with “same here”.

A third remarked that the paintings “seemed so real”.

Another shared Vincent van Gogh’s self-portrait with a mask hanging from his ear.

“Amazing as always,” wrote another user.

Read all the latest news, breaking news and updates on coronavirus here. follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Telegram.

]]>