united states – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 04:01:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://laprairie-shlm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-2-150x150.png united states – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ 32 32 Pa. Veterans Museum Hosts Luncheon for VFW Auxiliary State Officers – Delco Times https://laprairie-shlm.com/pa-veterans-museum-hosts-luncheon-for-vfw-auxiliary-state-officers-delco-times/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 02:24:04 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/pa-veterans-museum-hosts-luncheon-for-vfw-auxiliary-state-officers-delco-times/ MEDIA – The Pennsylvania Veterans Museum recently hosted VFW Auxiliary State Chair Pam Sopher, along with members of VFW Post 3460 In Media and VFW Post 928 in Folsom. About 25 auxiliary members were treated to a champagne lunch and a tour of the museum. The State President, from Titusville, Pennsylvania, travels the state visiting […]]]>

MEDIA – The Pennsylvania Veterans Museum recently hosted VFW Auxiliary State Chair Pam Sopher, along with members of VFW Post 3460 In Media and VFW Post 928 in Folsom. About 25 auxiliary members were treated to a champagne lunch and a tour of the museum. The State President, from Titusville, Pennsylvania, travels the state visiting various VFW posts and was thrilled to visit the Veterans Museum. Sandy Wilder, the state’s auxiliary chief of staff, accompanied Pam Sopher.

In addition to Auxiliary Members, the luncheon was attended by Jim King, Museum President, Bill Lovejoy, Vice President, Ed Buffman, Co-Founder and President Emeritus, and Jolene Buffman, Museum Trustee.

“We love that the auxiliary members of the VFW visit the museum every year and meet their new officers. Our mission is to honor all veterans,” said Buffman, who is a Navy veteran, having served on the USS Missouri in the Pacific during World War II.

The Pennsylvania Veterans Museum contains a large collection of artifacts and memorabilia from WWII in Vietnam, as well as interactive kiosks featuring powerful stories from area veterans.

The Pennsylvania Veterans Museum is located at 12 E. State St., Media, on the lower level of the historic Media Armory. The museum is open on Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Free entry. For more information, call 610-566-0788.

Krueger Announces Grant to Improve Nether Providence Township Park

State Representative Leanne Krueger, D-161 of Nether Providence, recently announced that the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development has awarded Nether Providence $148,600 to make improvements to Hepford Park.

The funding will be used to build a new playground and dugouts for the baseball diamonds, redesign the parking lot, repair and repaint fences, improve concession stands, shade trees and display signage.

The American Legion is hosting a bingo with designer bags

The Ladies Auxiliary of American Legion Post 507, 20 W. Cleveland Ave., Norwood, will host Designer Bag Bingo, 7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 22. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. The evening will include bingo, door prizes, 50/50, raffle baskets, cash bar and BYO snacks. Tickets are $25 in advance for ten bingo games and $30 at the door. Groups of eight or more can reserve a table. For tickets, call Charity Walsh at 610-848-8499.

COSA offers the Arthritis Foundation’s “Walk with Ease” program

The Delaware County Office of Services for the Aging, in partnership with Wayne Senior Center, will sponsor the Arthritis Foundation’s nationally recognized Walk with Ease program beginning at 10:30 a.m. Friday, April 1, for people 60+ who need arthritis pain relief. or just stay active.

The online program will last six weeks. The last session will take place on Friday, May 13. Participants will receive the Arthritis Foundation’s Walk with Ease guide and walk independently three times a week with the assistance of a facilitator in this self-directed version of the program. Participants will share and receive support from a leader and other walkers in weekly online group meetings. In addition, participants will receive information and support guidelines via weekly emails.

This evidence-based program has been shown to reduce arthritis pain, increase balance, strength, and walking pace, build confidence in one’s ability to be physically active, and improve overall health.
The costs of the program are covered by COSA, so the program is free. However, class size is limited. Registration is mandatory.

To register, contact Ellen Williams at williamse@co.delaware.pa.us or 610-499-1937. When you call or email, include your name, address, phone number, and email address.

Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital Hosts Open House at New Women’s Health Center

Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital invites members of the community to an open house at its newly renovated Women’s Health Center from 2-5:30 p.m. on Monday, March 21. A blessing ceremony for the center will take place at 2 p.m.

Specialist providers in the fields of gynecology, plastic and reconstructive surgery, and breast surgery will be on hand at the open house to discuss treatment options and answer questions about available services for women and men.

The new health center is located in the Medical Office Building at 1501 Lansdowne Avenue, Suite 302 in Darby. The fully renovated 3,200 square foot space includes 10 patient exam rooms and serves as a specialty central suite for providers to collaborate on patient care.

Open house attendees will have the opportunity to meet James Cosgrove, DO, an experienced OB/GYN who specializes in minimally invasive robotic gynecological surgery; Karen Kish, MD, a skilled breast surgeon who provides breast health care to women and men; John Fernandez, MD, board-certified plastic and reconstructive surgeon specializing in microsurgery and the treatment of lymphedema; Nathaniel Holzman, MD, board-certified plastic surgeon specializing in breast surgery, body contouring, and cosmetic and reconstructive surgery; and the center’s staff nurse practitioners who play a critical role in patient care.
Attendees will also have the opportunity to tour areas of Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital related to coordinated care available at the new Women’s Center, which feature the latest in mammography technology, which can help detect breast cancer early, when it’s easier to treat, and Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning technology to help better diagnose and treat low bone density and prevent serious fractures.

To learn more about Women’s Health Services at Mercy Fitzgerald, visit https://www.trinityhealthma.org/womens-care-at-mercy-fitzgerald.

Catholic Social Services greet Afghan evacuees at a local lunch

The Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will host a welcome luncheon for newly arrived individuals and families as part of their Afghanistan Placement and Assistance Program from 1-3 p.m., Saturday, March 19, at St. John Chrysostom Parish, 617 S. Providence Rd., Wallingford.

About 125 guests will attend, including about 75 Afghan evacuees as well as program supporters, staff and volunteers. Highlights of the event will include traditional Afghan and Mediterranean dishes, American and Afghan music, a poetry reading and testimonials from participants of CSS’s Afghanistan Placement and Assistance Program. Reverend Edward Hallinan, pastor of St. John Chrysostom Parish, will offer the invocation and blessing. The Reverend Christopher Walsh, pastor of St. Raymond de Peñafort Parish in Philadelphia, will be the emcee for the event.

Since December 2021, CSS has hosted a total of 108 Afghan evacuees under its Afghan Placement and Assistance Program. This number includes 14 Afghan families, a mother with newborn twins and an expectant mother.

Through a partnership with the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, CSS helps Afghan evacuees acclimatize and establish a new life in the United States of America by providing pre-arrival and reception services ; support for basic needs; cultural orientation; language services; finding safe accommodation; use; Health care; and case management services. The CSS also collaborates with local and national agencies such as HIAS and the Nationalities Services Center who have extensive experience in humanitarian aid and assistance to refugees and immigrants.

For more information on Catholic Social Services in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, visit https://cssphiladelphia.org.

A Beef and Beer fundraiser is planned to support the Ridley Lacrosse team

The Ridley High School Men’s Lacrosse Boosters will be hosting a Beef n’ Beer fundraiser, 7-11 p.m., Saturday, March 26, at the Milmont Inn, 300 Belmont Ave., in support of the Ridley High School Men’s Lacrosse Team . Cost is $40 and includes bottled beer, wine, mixed drinks, food, raffle baskets, 50/50 raffle and music from a DJ. To purchase a ticket, Venmo @RidleyLaxBoosters or request a ticket via email at Ridleyboyslax@gmail.com.

Readers can email community news and photos to Peg DeGrassa at pdegrassa@21st-centurymedia.com.

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Downtown LA Museum of Social Justice has a new exhibit featuring photos of deported veterans https://laprairie-shlm.com/downtown-la-museum-of-social-justice-has-a-new-exhibit-featuring-photos-of-deported-veterans/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 01:16:16 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/downtown-la-museum-of-social-justice-has-a-new-exhibit-featuring-photos-of-deported-veterans/ Documentary photographer Joseph Silva has spent six years documenting people he calls family. “We have the same history. So we can talk about similar things that we did in the army or out of the army,” Silva said. His new exhibition titled “Deported Veterans” exemplifies just that. He gets to know the veterans who were […]]]>
Documentary photographer Joseph Silva has spent six years documenting people he calls family.

“We have the same history. So we can talk about similar things that we did in the army or out of the army,” Silva said.

His new exhibition titled “Deported Veterans” exemplifies just that. He gets to know the veterans who were deported and then asks to take their picture.

Silva is a veteran himself.

“I joined the Navy right out of high school because I wanted to see the world,” Silva said.

According to Silva, every year 5,000 new immigrants join the US military.

“People automatically assume you have to be a US citizen, to be a veteran, that’s not true, you can be a green card holder and join the US military.”

He hopes this exhibit can help people understand that these men and women who put their lives on the line for our county call the United States home. Yet they often don’t stay here long after serving.

“These are men and women who served in the United States military. And with this little crime or this little glitch in the system, they were ignored. They were kicked out,” Silva said.

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The Only Exclusive Civil War Museum Remaining in Philadelphia Faced a Choice: Sell a Jewel or a Shutter | Lifestyles https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-only-exclusive-civil-war-museum-remaining-in-philadelphia-faced-a-choice-sell-a-jewel-or-a-shutter-lifestyles/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 12:05:41 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-only-exclusive-civil-war-museum-remaining-in-philadelphia-faced-a-choice-sell-a-jewel-or-a-shutter-lifestyles/ PHILADELPHIA — It’s a one-of-a-kind artifact that rings surprisingly relevant: a Civil War battle flag carried by a regiment of black Philadelphia soldiers — and hand-painted by David Bustill Bowser, the son of a slave fugitive and Philadelphia’s most acclaimed. 19th century black artist. On dark blue silk with gold fringe, the royal standard of […]]]>

PHILADELPHIA — It’s a one-of-a-kind artifact that rings surprisingly relevant: a Civil War battle flag carried by a regiment of black Philadelphia soldiers — and hand-painted by David Bustill Bowser, the son of a slave fugitive and Philadelphia’s most acclaimed. 19th century black artist.

On dark blue silk with gold fringe, the royal standard of the 127th United States Colored Infantry depicts a soldier gone to war bidding farewell to Lady Columbia, the goddess of Liberty. An inscription captures the bitter burden imposed on black soldiers fighting for freedom: “We will prove that we are men.

In recent years, the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) Civil War Museum and Library in Frankford — Philadelphia’s only remaining museum devoted exclusively to the Civil War and the keeper of the flag for more than a century — were faced with a cruel choice over the relic he had recently restored: sell or shutter.

Down to nearly its last dollar and unable to display the large flag in the cramped quarters of its crumbling mansion off Frankford Avenue, the modest museum decided to put the flag up for auction in 2019. It was quickly bought for nearly $200,000 from the Atlanta History Center, home to one of the nation’s largest Civil War exhibits. The flag of Philadelphia, now so far south, is a centerpiece of the center’s famed United States Colored Troops (USCT) collection.

And just like that, another of Philadelphia’s financially strapped historical and cultural institutions gave away a treasure just to keep afloat.

Joseph Perry, a retired city librarian, who is president of GAR, founded in 1926 by Philadelphia Civil War veterans and their descendants and now run entirely by volunteers, described the sale as a ‘one-shot’ who saved the museum. while securing a home where the 6-foot-wide double-sided flag – an eagle grasps an arrow on its back – could be displayed in full.

“Selling it cut our hearts,” Perry said in a recent interview. “But our mission was preservation and sharing – and we have both. We got the money we needed, and the flag is restored and visible. It was win-win. This flag saved us.

If nothing else, it’s allowed the oft-overlooked museum — which has a 7,000-volume research library and hundreds of Philadelphia-centric Civil War artifacts, including uniforms and firearms, paintings from battle and battle swords, diaries and daguerreotypes, period diaries and manuscript inscriptions. records – live to fight another day.

Late last year, the museum used proceeds from the flag — about $135,000 after buyer’s fees — to help buy a smaller, certified historic building along Frankford Avenue near Holmesburg. Although half the size, it’s without the mansion’s expensive repairs, and far from the violence and drugs that plague Griscom Street, where the museum has resided in the John Ruan House since 1958. Closed for now, the museum is expected to open in the new space in June.

Perry said he hopes the increased visibility of the new location will attract new visitors and allow the museum to focus on educational programming, community outreach and virtual tours.

“It’s all part of the need – and the need is critical,” Perry said. “There must be an influx of new members – people who will take over the museum and see it in the future. But considering where we were, I’m one hundred percent optimistic about a better future.

Still, the loss of the flag stings, especially given Philadelphia’s singular connection to the USCT.

Camp William Penn, located just outside the Cheltenham town limits, was the largest federal training center for black soldiers during the Civil War. More than 10,000 free black men and men who had escaped slavery were trained there, including more than 8,000 from Pennsylvania – the most of any state. Even the ranks of the notorious 54th Massachusetts Infantry, made famous in the 1989 film Glory, have swelled by more than 150 black Philadelphians.

Bowser, a famous ornamental and portrait artist, painted the colors of the 11 USCT regiments in Pennsylvania. Only the restored 127th remains. It’s a physical connection to soldiers who, as the flag says, have been forced to prove themselves. Initially paid less for their service, USCT fighters were primarily regulated to grumble labor over the racist belief that they were better workers than soldiers. But other USCT soldiers suffered heavy casualties in key battles. For its part, the 127th waved its flag during the Siege of Petersburg and the Battle of Appomattox Court House, where troops witnessed the surrender of the Confederate army.

Andy Waskie, a former Temple teacher and author of Philadelphia and the Civil War, who serves as the museum’s vice president and historian, said the flag’s post-war history is unclear. But it was likely donated in the early 20th century to GAR Post 2 — the city’s largest Union veterans post — by members of Post 103, one of only three city chapters open. to the colored troops, and where Bowser and Octavius ​​V. Catto had been. members. When the museum raised $50,000 to restore it, parts of the silk were held together only by paint.

Most of the flags of the USCT of Pennsylvania were tattered and destroyed according to military custom, along with dozens of other Civil War flags, at West Point just before the start of World War II. (Nationally, there are only nine USCT regimental flags, out of the original 175, said Greg Biggs, a historian who studies Civil War flags.)

Reverend Mark Tyler, pastor and curator of the historic Mother Bethel AME Church in Society Hill, where Frederick Douglass and Catto recruited black Philadelphians during the Civil War, said the flag highlights the challenges black Americans have faced. always faced to preserve and tell their story.

In the turbulent years after the war, many black veterans were preoccupied with far more pressing tasks than saving artifacts, such as finding once-enslaved family members, conserving contested lands, or finding work. in hostile cities.

“Preserving and keeping things is a luxury,” Tyler said. “If you’re juggling between providing for the present and serving the future, the past will always be number three. Because of that, a lot of these things have fallen by the wayside, and that’s a huge loss.

The museum’s move comes as more historic institutions in Philadelphia sell heirlooms to stay afloat.

In 2019, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania laid off a third of its staff before selling $2.2 million worth of commemorative medals. (A library, not a museum, its officials questioned the objects’ research value.) In 2018, the Philadelphia Museum of History, mandated to manage the city’s cultural artifacts, abruptly closed. Previously, he had sold over 2,000 items to cover construction costs. (His collection, which includes many Civil War artifacts, is scheduled to be restarted through Drexel.)

While often playing second fiddle in a city whose historic mark is decidedly revolutionary, Philadelphia’s rich Civil War history – it was a vital supplier of men, money, hospitals and supplies – has was particularly affected.

In 2016, the then-homeless Civil War Museum of Philadelphia, which once occupied a stately Pine Street mansion, transferred ownership of its prized collection of artifacts to the Gettysburg Foundation, the National Park’s nonprofit partner. Gettysburg department. His books, letters, and other two-dimensional records remain available to scholars at the Union League Heritage Center in Philadelphia.

While the Union League holds an extensive collection of Civil War artifacts and documents, including swords, paintings and research materials related to USCT soldiers – and has displayed the restored flag loaned before the GAR does not sell it – the departure left the Frankford Museum alone, and often deserted, as the last exclusive guardian of Civil War history in Philadelphia.

On a recent afternoon, Waskie offered a tour of the intimate new space, once owned by a family of Civil War veterans.

The museum’s main attractions – “Old Baldy”, the preserved head of General George G. Meade’s war horse, and the bloodstained pillowcase strip from Lincoln’s deathbed, both considered grails of Civil War – have already been installed at the new location. But small exposures also have power. A soldier’s hand-painted canteen. A flag made to fly above Independence Hall after Lincoln’s assassination, made with such haste that it included extra stars. The frills of a Victorian mourning dress, slipped into a box, like a coffin.

Waskie lamented the loss of the rare flag as a painful and painful necessity.

“We had to sell something to keep going,” he said, in the calm of the new space. “This collection of artifacts and documents – it needs to be preserved. If it’s gone, it’s lost.


©2022 Philadelphia Inquirer, LLC. Visit at inquirer.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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From top musicians to museum staff, thousands… https://laprairie-shlm.com/from-top-musicians-to-museum-staff-thousands/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 17:07:30 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/from-top-musicians-to-museum-staff-thousands/ From top musicians to museum staff, thousands of arts workers are taking a public stand against the Russian president’s invasion of Ukraine. New Russian laws mean that speaking out puts their livelihoods, freedom and safety even more at risk. While the war of Ukraine entered its second week, more than 17,000 Russian cultural sector workers […]]]>

From top musicians to museum staff, thousands of arts workers are taking a public stand against the Russian president’s invasion of Ukraine. New Russian laws mean that speaking out puts their livelihoods, freedom and safety even more at risk.

While the war of Ukraine entered its second week, more than 17,000 Russian cultural sector workers signed an open letter demanding the withdrawal of troops from Russia and calling the war “senseless and pointless”.

“The reasoning behind this so-called ‘special military operation’ is a construct entirely made by representatives of the Russian state. We are opposed to this war being fought in our name,” they wrote.

Leading Russian personalities on the international art scene have also denounced the Russian invasion.

On February 25, the conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Kirill Petrenko, described by Vladimir Putin as an “insidious attack on Ukraine”.



Artists Kirill Savchenkov and Alexandra Sukhareva have pulled out of the Venice Biennale with a Instagram statement saying “there is no place for art when civilians are dying under missile fire”.

And nearly 20 musicians made statements against the war at the classical music magazine Van. “How do I feel now?” Pain, devastation, shame,” wrote pianist Polina Osetinskaya.

‘The stakes are high’

Such outspoken opposition to decisions made by the Russian president is rare and dangerous. According to independent monitoring group OVD, more than 8,000 people had been arrested for taking part in anti-war protests in Russia as of March 4, nine days after Putin invaded Ukraine.

On March 4, the Russian parliament upped the ante by passing a new law providing for tougher penalties for public dissent. Russians who are seen as discrediting the armed forces, spreading “false information” or calling for unauthorized public action could now face various penalties, including long prison sentences.

“The stakes are high,” Natalia Prilutskaya, Amnesty International’s Russia researcher, told FRANCE 24. and very heavy fines.

At the same time, Russia’s growing media restrictions make it unlikely that counter-narratives about opponents of the regime will surface. Some high profile opponents have already been the subject of posts online sharing their image with words such as “traitor” or “enemy” scrawled on it.

“We don’t know who is behind all this, it could be just one person or the Telegram channel,” Prilutskaya said. “What is really worrying is that there are groups in society who support the war and we can expect there to be acts where some of these people might want to attack those who express.”

Most of the 17,000 signatories of the letter are museum curators or art critics working in the cultural sector, who are not well enough known to be the subject of such messages. That doesn’t mean they’re safe. “Ordinary people risk a lot, especially those who live in small towns. There are all kinds of dangers they face,” Prilutskaya said. “But they still found it necessary to speak out about it.”

“War destroys everything”

Meanwhile, Western countries are rapidly removing Russian culture from their schedules.

In addition to being excluded from international events such as the Eurovision Song Contest, the Cannes, Glasgow and Stockholm film festivals have also announced a boycott of Russian delegations.

In New York and London, opera houses and classical music halls have canceled Russian music and ballet performances. The Metropolitan Opera in New York added that it would no longer work with artists or institutions that support Putin’s policies.

In the Netherlands, the Hermitage Amsterdam, which is a subsidiary of the Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg, has cut ties with the Russian institution. “War destroys everything. Even 30 years of collaboration,” he said in a statement on March 3.

A worldwide rejection of Russian art and culture presents its own risks, Prilutskaya said. “If this continues, we fear that these people [in Russia] who speak out and those who want to be heard would effectively be imprisoned in their country.

“And Russian propaganda is also pretty good at perverting what’s going on, so they can say, ‘We’ve been telling you this for ages. The West is against Russia as a whole. It’s not against Putin, or against one of the oligarchs, it is against Russia.

“An act of cowardice”

Some Russian artists have already found themselves caught between the demands of Western cultural institutions and the Russian authorities.

The Munich Philharmonic sacked famed conductor Valery Gergiev on March 1 for refusing to speak out against Putin’s invasion of Ukraine. Gergiev has known the Russian president for three decades and has long supported him. He was also dismissed as honorary conductor of the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra.

Opera star Anna Netrebko has also lost engagements in Germany, Switzerland and the United States due to her ties to Putin. The soprano celebrated her 50th birthday by singing in the Kremlin and publicly supported the president’s election campaign in 2014.

In a Facebook post she has since said she is “opposed to this war”, but refrained from mentioning Putin by name. She added: “I am not a political person. Forcing artists, or any public figure, to express their political views in public and denounce their homeland is not right.

Even so, given her close ties to Putin, New York’s Metropolitan Opera said it was “hard to imagine a scenario” in which she would perform there again.

“One argument is that art and politics should be separate, but not speaking out in this particular situation is whether you support war and absolutely brutal, unnecessary, senseless killing,” Prilutskaya said.

“Some very high-level artists have long enjoyed closeness to the highest leaders in Russia. That could be their position, that they’re okay with what’s going on [in Ukraine]. Or is this an act of cowardice by people who are probably in a better position than many of those 17,000 people who signed the open letter? »

While the balance of power may work against them, culture workers who have spoken out against the war are not alone. Russian medical professionals started their own open letter which gathered 15,000 signatories before February 28. Some 30,000 Russian computer scientists and 600 scientists also did the same.

In a country of 144 million people, these acts are still what Prilutskaya calls “little shoots” of resistance that need support to grow stronger. But, she added, “there is hope. The bigger the anti-war movement, the more likely it is that Russian aggression will at least diminish.

“And the scale of the protests and the fact that there are all these letters from different parts of society is unprecedented.”

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Ukraine’s main art museum turns into bustling volunteer center https://laprairie-shlm.com/ukraines-main-art-museum-turns-into-bustling-volunteer-center/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 10:31:13 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/ukraines-main-art-museum-turns-into-bustling-volunteer-center/ LVIV, Ukraine – The National Art Gallery in Lviv is Ukraine’s premier art museum, and for good reason. Founded in 1902, when this western Ukrainian city was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, its permanent collection today numbers more than 60,000 pieces spanning seven centuries. The museum’s most famous work is “The Moneylender” by 17th-century French […]]]>

LVIV, Ukraine – The National Art Gallery in Lviv is Ukraine’s premier art museum, and for good reason. Founded in 1902, when this western Ukrainian city was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, its permanent collection today numbers more than 60,000 pieces spanning seven centuries.

The museum’s most famous work is “The Moneylender” by 17th-century French Baroque artist Georges de la Tour.

With Ukraine now under attack from Russia, the gallery is closed, its masterpieces hidden in the branch of the Potocki Palace Museum or behind tall piles of sandbags.

The museum offices, however, have never been busier.

Outside, a line of young Ukrainians winds its way down Kopernyka Street, eager to volunteer to support their country’s fight against Russia.

The ground floor is filled with women packing cardboard boxes with medical supplies.

The operation is supervised by a Leopolitan named Mark Fetsych, head of the oncology department at a local hospital before the invasion.

Now he spends twelve hours a day at the museum and very little time in the hospital.

Volunteers at the offices of the National Art Gallery in Lviv, March 4, 2022. (Lazar Berman/The Times of Israel)

“In my daily practice, I can only help a few people a day,” Fetsych explained. “But right now, by coordinating this medical unit, we can help thousands of people.”

The goods come from Europe and the United States, he said. Ukraine has a logistics center in Poland and sends goods from there to Lviv.

The museum houses one of five volunteer sorting and dispatch centers in Lviv.

At the entrance to the current medical floor, boxes from Poland are opened and sorted into boxes. Other women with lists fill out applications and send them to the other end of the medical area.

“We send everything, basics like pills, special medical equipment, military medicine, really everything,” the surgeon said.

Ninety percent of the supplies are for civilians, he said, but the country still has a major need for specialized military medical supplies, especially personal medical kits.

“Now we ask everyone in the world, if you can, at least give us something,” Fetsych pleaded.

The museum’s volunteer center is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, but Fetsych said he was trying to calm down. “I’m a surgeon, I know what it means to burn out like a doctor, so I know sleep time is very important, so I try around 10-11pm to leave and go to sleep.”

Volunteers pack medicine at the National Art Gallery in Lviv, March 4, 2022. (Lazar Berman/The Times of Israel)

There are hundreds of Ukrainians working in the museum offices, all volunteers who heard about the center through word of mouth.

They work quickly, quietly and seriously. Although at first the scene seems chaotic, there is a frantic order for the young men and women to prepare food, spread out toys and carry bags to trucks waiting outside.

On the third floor, Yuri Viznyak, the director of the art gallery, stands in his office. Several volunteers man the phones under a plasma TV showing the work being done in the various offices of the museum.

“We have been working for seven days already,” Viznyak said. “We were the first to receive help from our fellow citizens. Three days ago we started receiving from Poland from abroad.

As supplies arrived, Viznyak adapted his operation.

“At the beginning, we gave food directly to the refugees,” he explained. They now distribute to local organizations and governments.

On Wednesday alone, 55 tonnes of humanitarian aid was delivered to the eastern cities of Kharkiv and Sumy, as well as to Odessa on the Black Sea.

Potocki Palace from the National Art Gallery in Lviv. (Антон Супруненко – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0)

Outside, a blue truck was loaded with supplies for the capital, Kiev, a key Russian target.

Viznyak said he would continue the logistics operation for as long as needed. Either way, he doesn’t have to worry about the thousands of visitors who come to see European masterpieces every day.

“All images and art are hidden,” he explained, before shaking hands with this reporter and quickly returning to work.

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The CCP and the Phoenix Art Museum host a Japanese exhibition devoted to historical and contemporary photography https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-ccp-and-the-phoenix-art-museum-host-a-japanese-exhibition-devoted-to-historical-and-contemporary-photography/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 08:03:10 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/the-ccp-and-the-phoenix-art-museum-host-a-japanese-exhibition-devoted-to-historical-and-contemporary-photography/ University of Arizona Creative Photography Centeras part of its historic collaboration with the Phoenix Art Museumprovides unprecedented insight into how post-World War II Japanese photographers attempted to counter their government’s propaganda. With 87 photographs preserved over many years, the Phoenix Art Museum hosts the exhibition “Farewell to Photography: The Hitachi Collection of Postwar Japanese Photographs, […]]]>

University of Arizona Creative Photography Centeras part of its historic collaboration with the Phoenix Art Museumprovides unprecedented insight into how post-World War II Japanese photographers attempted to counter their government’s propaganda.

With 87 photographs preserved over many years, the Phoenix Art Museum hosts the exhibition “Farewell to Photography: The Hitachi Collection of Postwar Japanese Photographs, 1961 to 1989” until mid-summer.

Dr. Audrey Sands, assistant curator of photography for the Norton family, spoke about the upcoming exhibition.

“We have a responsibility as a cultural institution to reflect the incredible diversity of our audiences,” said Dr Sands.

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The Hitachi collection is one of three annual photography exhibitions hosted by the Phoenix Art Museum, drawing from the CCP’s unrivaled collection of historic and contemporary photography.

The Hitachi images of post-World War II Japanese photographers attempt to change the narrative their country published after the war. In one image, a flock of birds sits on a tree, as three elderly men stand outside a doorway, a couple close their eyes as they smoke with the silhouette of a man walking down a hallway.

“These photographers were against traditional practices and what was traditionally accepted by the art world, the photographic world, and government-sanctioned practices,” Sands said. “They inspired a whole generation of artists. I think that’s a real lesson: think outside of the boundaries you inherit.

The origins of the exhibition began in 1988 when the CCP set out to acquire works by contemporary photographers in post-World War II Japan through grants from the Hitachi Corporation. After recovering these photographs, the UA Center collaborated with the Phoenix Art Museum to present the collection in the state of Arizona.

Sands said she hopes the exhibit will expand and challenge the worldview and perspectives of visitors to the Southwestern United States. As part of the team that brought together the PCC and the Phoenix Art Museum for the exhibition, it was important to present the parallels of post-war Japan. and the present day.

The post-war government in Japan soon used the medium of photography as a propaganda tool. The government’s documentary style sent a message to Japanese citizens that what they were seeing was the only truth they needed to heed.

“These photographers meant that all photography is manipulation and distortion,” Sands said.

RELATED: The Center for Creative Photography introduces digital viewing during the pandemic

The Japanese were also dealing with the consequences of the American military occupation and the influx of Western culture that impacted and distorted Japanese culture to the point where these photographers wondered, “What is national identity?” »

The photograph “New couple who closed their eyes, Tokyo,showing a couple taken together in the middle of a shot, their eyes closed, smoking, is an example of distancing from the expected complacency and highlighting a new approach to photography.

“It symbolizes this moment in photography, signaling a totally new approach to vision. It alludes to a kind of beyond and a refusal to meet gazes and suggests that photography can be a screen between two worlds. There is a kind of surrealism in this image,” Sands said.

Other photographic techniques that grew out of the resistance against government propaganda were to shoot higher angles and boost contrast for grain in black and white photos. One of the biggest that is featured in the exhibition is the are-bure-boke, translated as “rough, fuzzy and fuzzy”, which can be seen in the photo “Ishikawamon, Kanazawaas a group of crows perched atop many branches with a dim light behind them.

“All of the exhibits are the result of collaborative work between so many individuals in the museums,” Sands said. “It was not just my work that entered the exhibition, but the collective work of my many colleagues at CCP and the Phoenix Art Museum.”


*El Inde Arizona is a news service of the University of Arizona School of Journalism.


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URI alumnus, acclaimed filmmaker, founder of the prestigious WWII museum in Wakefield, RI – URI News https://laprairie-shlm.com/uri-alumnus-acclaimed-filmmaker-founder-of-the-prestigious-wwii-museum-in-wakefield-ri-uri-news/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 19:09:55 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/uri-alumnus-acclaimed-filmmaker-founder-of-the-prestigious-wwii-museum-in-wakefield-ri-uri-news/ KINGSTON, RI – February 28, 2022 – With the Russian military invading Ukraine, it’s hard to avoid the thought that another major war in Europe is about to break out. Around the world, China has come under heavy criticism for reports of its oppression and violence against Muslim groups like the Uyghurs in Xinjiang. Meanwhile, […]]]>

KINGSTON, RI – February 28, 2022 – With the Russian military invading Ukraine, it’s hard to avoid the thought that another major war in Europe is about to break out.

Around the world, China has come under heavy criticism for reports of its oppression and violence against Muslim groups like the Uyghurs in Xinjiang.

Meanwhile, here in the United States, most have been horrified by the attack on the US Capitol and many fear that supporters of a former president, whom many critics liken to a cult leader, will sue the efforts to overturn the elections.

A REMINDER OF THE HORROR: Tim Gray points to a mannequin wearing an authentic striped uniform of a young concentration camp worker who made shoes at Auschwitz. URI Photo by Michael Salerno Photography.

With so much violence and potential for war, now seems the perfect time to visit the World War II Foundation Global Education Center and Museum in Wakefield, watch one of foundation founder Tim Gray’s more than 30 World War II documentaries that tell personal stories of this generation, and learn about his latest creation, virtual reality presentations that allow viewers to hold on the shores of Normandy during the D-Day invasion.

In what has been described as one of the best WWII museums in the world, visitors can see, feel and hear the heroism, fear, selflessness and acts of bravery of those who served and of those who remained in the United States. But they can also experience the bloodshed, hatred and worship of a leader who allowed millions of Jews to be killed in the Holocaust.

WOMEN IN WWII: This mannequin shows the uniform of a woman who served in the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) and is part of the Women in Military Service exhibit. URI Photo by Michael Salerno Photography.

The museum is open on Wednesdays and Saturdays by appointment. Children under 12 and veterans can visit for free. Regular admission is $10.

“For school groups, the Foundation covers admission and bus transportation to the museum,” Gray said.

For his contributions to capturing and preserving the history, artifacts, and narratives of those who served in World War II, Gray, a 1989 graduate of the University of Rhode Island’s journalism program, was inducted into the Rhode Island Heritage Hall of Fame last fall.

While thrilled with the honor and others like America’s National Public Television Programming Achievement Award and the Emmy Awards, Gray says the most important thing is for the public to visit the museum, tucked away in a corner from the former Kenyon department store at 344 Main Street, watch the documentaries and discover the virtual reality products he developed.

PIECE OF HISTORY: This is a small piece of the USS Arizona, Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, for students and the public to hold. URI Photo by Michael Salerno Photography.

“I hope the museum and my other work helps show kids and adults what to watch out for today,” Gray said. “It can help people be aware of warning signs.”

He talked about it as he passed pictures of Jews in mass graves and a mannequin displaying an authentic striped uniform of a young concentration camp worker who made shoes in the camps.

Difficult to avoid being overwhelmed when entering the museum. There are displays of uniforms and combat gear worn by American soldiers and their allies, and those of the Germans and Japanese, wartime propaganda posters filled with hateful depictions of various groups, weapons and gear used in Europe and Asia. As big band music and old radio shows play in the background, visitors can read letters of grief and hope sent to and from war zones, see photos of young men in times of war and look and borrow one of the 600 books that line the shelves.

“The museum is three years old and about 2,000 young people have visited it,” Gray said. “No children were disengaged. They are amazed by the colors, the uniforms. These are tactile exhibits. If a child wants to put on a helmet, he can. If a girl wants to touch a rifle, like the Johnson 1941 rifle , which was made in Rhode Island, it can.

Visitors can also activate an air raid siren, see a radio made by a soldier in a Japanese POW camp, touch a Japanese samurai sword and a piece of the USS Arizona, the warship that was attacked. by the Japanese and remains at the bottom of Pearl Harbor today.

The ceremonial shovel used by Adolf Hitler to dig the ground on the highway and some of Hitler’s china are also displayed there.

Gray honors Tuskegee Airmen in a display. He said they were among the best pilots of World War II, yet they were subjected to Jim Crow laws and racism at home and in the service.

A former Channel 10 sports reporter, Gray said he was looking to do work that would inspire him and others after leaving television.

“I thank URI for helping me make this change, and having a solid background in journalism from my time at URI has allowed me to make this smooth transition to a new career. Journalism professors like Linda Levin and Tony Silvia have been so important to my development.

“But the best course I took was the Holocaust with Professor Bob Weisbord. Everything I did was because of what I learned at URI and from Linda, Tony and Bob.

The beginning of his work to tell the story of World War II through the people who lived through it began in 2006 when he brought five veterans back to Normandy, France to tell their stories for a documentary.

“I found even more stories, and I found that each one was different, no two were the same.”

And now he’s moved to virtual reality, largely because he knows young people learn visually. He has developed three virtual reality products that immerse viewers in the heat of action at Pearl Harbor, Normandy and the Battle of the Bulge.

“We put people on the beach in Normandy as the waves hit their feet and we put them in a German bunker at the Battle of the Bulge.”

You can learn more about the museum, Gray’s documentary and his virtual reality work by going to the World War II Foundation.

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Jewish Museum remembers Japanese internment in new exhibit, ‘So they came for me’ https://laprairie-shlm.com/jewish-museum-remembers-japanese-internment-in-new-exhibit-so-they-came-for-me/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 22:13:35 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/jewish-museum-remembers-japanese-internment-in-new-exhibit-so-they-came-for-me/ On February 19, 1942, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, interning all people of Japanese descent living in California, Oregon, and Washington State. “So They Came for Me,” the new exhibit at the Jewish Museum of Milwaukee, opens just in time to reflect on the 80th anniversary of what resulted from that executive order […]]]>

On February 19, 1942, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, interning all people of Japanese descent living in California, Oregon, and Washington State. “So They Came for Me,” the new exhibit at the Jewish Museum of Milwaukee, opens just in time to reflect on the 80th anniversary of what resulted from that executive order – the imprisonment of 120,000 civilians, many of them American citizens. The prisoner did nothing wrong. They were simply members of what was considered the wrong race.

The title of the exhibition comes from the German theologian Martin Niemöller, speaking of the situation in his country when Hitler took power: “First they came for the socialists, and I didn’t speak because I didn’t was not a socialist. Then they came for the trade unionists and I didn’t say anything — because I wasn’t a trade unionist. Then they came for the Jews, and I didn’t say anything, because I wasn’t Jewish. Then they came for me and there was no one to speak for me.

“Then They Came for Me” has already been exhibited in Chicago, New York and San Francisco. For its appearance in Milwaukee, the Jewish Museum incorporated oral histories of Japanese-American families who found their way to Wisconsin after their release. The relevance of the exhibition to the mission of the museum is easy to understand. “It’s a shared experience of prejudice based solely on race, an insole based on race,” says curator Molly Dubin. The relevance to contemporary issues of immigration and social justice is evident.

Although some artifacts of camp life are on display, including objects carved out of wood by prisoners, most of the exhibit consists of photographic display panels accompanied by text. Most of the photos were taken by the most acclaimed photographers of the time – Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange and Clem Albers – employed by the federal government to document the internment. Eventually, one of the captives, Toyo Miyatke, was able to take some of the photos included in the exhibit.


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“Then they came for me” contextualizing the racism that made Executive Order 9066 possible with text that examines legislation intended to slow Japanese immigration to the United States and discriminate against them before the Immigration Act of 1924 does not completely prohibit additional arrivals of Japanese.

Internment photos tell harrowing stories of ordinary civilians caught up in ethnic cleansing, the mass displacement of a population to camps in remote places, usually deserts or swamps. Telltale signage can be seen in a photo: EVACUATION SALE: FURNITURE MUST BE SOLD. The Japanese received pennies on the dollar for real estate as well as personal property. Each internee was only allowed to carry one suitcase in captivity. In 1988, each survivor received $20,000 in reparations.

The photos document long lines of Japanese, dressed in their best Sunday clothes, marching under heavy guard towards the waiting trains. An elderly blind man is helped off a train by soldiers. The faces of the captives are impassive, but sadness and worry seep in. An ugly set of faces can be seen in a photo of a crowd watching a convoy of internees pass by. The jaws are hardened while others smile. A few passers-by seem to be making fun of the Japanese.

Camp life is well documented, including the wooden guard towers topped with machine guns and surrounded by barbed wire. The barracks stand on dusty ground and a woman teaches children on a wooden porch as a school. In one of the largest camps, Manzanar, internees are seen harvesting tomatoes. Some detainees were allowed to find work outside the camps. Others demonstrated their unbroken patriotism by volunteering for the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, one of the U.S. Army’s most decorated units in the European theater. The 12,000 internees who refused to sign a loyalty oath were moved to harsher confinement at Tule Lake.

Although a sign reproduces an air raid warning poster hung in San Francisco, “Then They Came for Me” downplays the panic that followed Pearl Harbor amid endemic anti-Asian racism in American popular culture, and n nor does it investigate political pressure. behind Roosevelt’s fateful decision to issue Executive Order 9066. The exhibit does a valuable service by highlighting the Orwellian language used by the United States.

“Then They Came for Me” runs from February 18 through May 29 at the Jewish Museum Milwaukee, 1360 N. Prospect Ave. For more information, visit milwaukeejewishmuseum.org.

David Luhrssen

David Luhrssen has taught at UWM and MIAD. He is the author of The Vietnam War on Film, Encyclopedia of Classic Rock and Hammer of the Gods: Thule Society and the Birth of Nazism.

Read more by David Luhrssen

February 17, 2022

4:13 p.m.

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Cincinnati Museum to Loan Robert Henri Painting to LA’s Huntington Library After Losing Super Bowl Friendly Bet https://laprairie-shlm.com/cincinnati-museum-to-loan-robert-henri-painting-to-las-huntington-library-after-losing-super-bowl-friendly-bet/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 19:02:21 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/cincinnati-museum-to-loan-robert-henri-painting-to-las-huntington-library-after-losing-super-bowl-friendly-bet/ There was a lot at stake last night at Super Bowl LVI, and not just for the Los Angeles Rams and Cincinnati Bengals. California Huntington Library, Art Museum and Botanical Gardens teams up with the Cincinnati Museum of Art for a friendly bet, betting each of their Robert-Henri paintings to the other museum for loan. […]]]>

There was a lot at stake last night at Super Bowl LVI, and not just for the Los Angeles Rams and Cincinnati Bengals.

California Huntington Library, Art Museum and Botanical Gardens teams up with the Cincinnati Museum of Art for a friendly bet, betting each of their Robert-Henri paintings to the other museum for loan.

Cincinnati Serious Patience (1915) is a portrait of a young girl in blue, the official color of the Rams, while the subject of Huntington’s Irish girl (1927) has a reddish-orange border on his white coat, reminiscent of the Bengals’ tiger-striped logo. Now that the Rams are reigning victorious, beating the Bengals 23-20, the paints will be reunited at the Huntington sometime later this year.

Serious Patience been waiting a long time to see her friend. After the Bengals take care of business on the football field on Sunday, she is invited to Cincinnati for a Dey play,” Cincinnati Art Museum director Cameron Kitchin wrote in a statement. declaration before the match (referring to Bengal’s unofficial chant, “who dey”).

When the Bengals scored, the museum announced “Touchdown Bengals!” to Facebooksharing a photo of Jim Dine’s 12ft tall bronze sculpture of a triumphant looking PInocchio that stands on the museum lawn.

It was the Huntington, of course, who had the last word. “Rams for Victory!” the museum wrote on Twittersharing an image of Irish girl with a Rams hat and the Lombardi Trophy. “Good game @cincyartmuseum – looking forward to hosting Serious Patience at the Huntington soon.

Henri is an intriguing figure in the history of art in the United States. Cincinnati native Robert Henry Cozad was forced to change his name after his father fatally shot another man during a cattle dispute in Nebraska. The artist studied at Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia and at the Académie Julian in Paris, but sought to go beyond the impressionist style of painting then dominant. Henri revolted against American academic art, helping to found what became known as the Ashcan School of American art.

The Henri bet, reported for the first time by the Cincinnati Business Mail, marks the first time in four years that museums have gotten in on the Super Bowl action. In 2018, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston shipped Mrs. James Warren (Mercy Otis), California. 1763, by John Singleton Copley to the Philadelphia Museum of Art after the Eagles beat the New England Patriots 41-33.

The museum’s first bet on the Super Bowl was placed in 2010, at the request of art journalist Tyler Green. After Green suggested the idea on his blog, Max Anderson, director of the Indianapolis Museum of Art goaded New Orleans Art Museum director John Bullard to bet on Indianapolis The Fifth Plague of Egypt through JMW Turner against New Orleans Ideal view of Tivoli through Claude Lorrain. (The New Orleans Saints won 31-17.)

In the years that followed, the Denver Art Museum lent the Seattle Art Museum Frederic Remingtonthe bronze sculpture of The bronchos hunter when the Seahawks beat the Broncos in 2014. The following year, when Seattle lost to the Patriots, he sent Albert Bierstadtit is Puget Sound on the Pacific Coast (1870) at the Clark Institute of Artin Williamstown, Massachusetts.

In 2017, the MFA Boston and the Top Art Museum in Atlanta refused to bet on any art, but engaged in meme-based trash talk in the Twitter-based #MuseumBowl in honor of the game.

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Global Museum Art Delivery Market Penetration and Forecast 2022-2029 https://laprairie-shlm.com/global-museum-art-delivery-market-penetration-and-forecast-2022-2029/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 13:12:35 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/global-museum-art-delivery-market-penetration-and-forecast-2022-2029/ Market research on the global museum art handover market examines the performance of the Market for the return of works of art from the museum 2022. It contains an in-depth analysis of the Museum Art Delivery market status and competitive landscape globally. Global Museum Art Delivery Market can be obtained through market details such as […]]]>

Market research on the global museum art handover market examines the performance of the Market for the return of works of art from the museum 2022. It contains an in-depth analysis of the Museum Art Delivery market status and competitive landscape globally. Global Museum Art Delivery Market can be obtained through market details such as growth drivers, latest developments, business strategies of Museum Art Delivery Market museums, the regional study and the future state of the market. The report also covers insights including the latest opportunities and challenges in the Museum Art Discount industry as well as historical and future future trends in the Museum Art Discount market. It focuses on the market dynamics which are constantly changing due to technological advancements and socio-economic status.

Get a FREE Sample Copy of the Museum Art Delivery Market Report 2022: https://calibreresearch.com/report/global-museum-art-handing-market-187965#request-sample

A recent Museum Art Handing Market study analyzes the crucial factors of the Museum Art Handing market based on the current industry situation, market demands, business strategies adopted by Museum Art Handing market players and their scenario of growth. This report isolates the Museum Art Discount market based on key players, type, application, and regions. First of all, Museum Art Handing market report will offer in-depth knowledge about the company profile, its core products and specifications, revenue generated, production cost, contact person. The report covers forecast and analysis of the art handing over museums market on a global and regional level.

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In this report, the pre and post COVID impact on market growth and development is well described for better understanding of the Museum Art Discount market on the basis of financial and industry analysis. The COVID-19 pandemic has affected a number of markets and the global museum art release market is no exception. However, the dominant players in the global museum art remittance market are determined to adopt new strategies and seek new sources of funding to overcome the growing hurdles for market growth.

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Agility
DHL
DB Schenker
Iron Mountain (Crozier)
Crown
MTAB
Freight systems
Etna
fine arts logistics
Workshop 4
Grace
Helu-Trans
USAArt
Yamato
Katolec
Mithals
Sinotrans
Deppon
Globalize
Michelle

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Transport
Packaging
Storage
Other

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public museum
Private museum
Museum exhibition

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North American market (United States, North American countries and Mexico),
European market (Germany, Museum Art Handing France Market, United Kingdom, Russia and Italy),
Asia-Pacific market (China, Museum Art Handing Japan and Korean market, Asian country and Southeast Asia),
South America (Brazil, Argentina, Republic of Colombia, etc.), geographical area
Africa (Saudi Peninsula, United Arab Emirates, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)

Museum Art Handing report provides past, present and future Museum Art Handing industry size, trends and forecast information related to Museum Art Handing revenue, growth, demand and supply scenario Handings expected. In addition, the opportunities and threats to the development of the Museum Art Handing market forecast period from 2022 to 2029 are also covered extensively in this research document.

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