york city – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 15:39:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://laprairie-shlm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-2-150x150.png york city – La Prairie SHLM http://laprairie-shlm.com/ 32 32 Visiting the most remote museum in the world is an adventure in itself https://laprairie-shlm.com/visiting-the-most-remote-museum-in-the-world-is-an-adventure-in-itself/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 18:30:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/visiting-the-most-remote-museum-in-the-world-is-an-adventure-in-itself/ Often referred to as the “museum at the end of the world”, the South Georgia Whale Museum is well worth the detour to get there. Few people would be willing to deal with multiple modes of transport, or the trouble of discovery a reliable means of transport to bring someone to the “end of the […]]]>

Often referred to as the “museum at the end of the world”, the South Georgia Whale Museum is well worth the detour to get there.

Few people would be willing to deal with multiple modes of transport, or the trouble of discovery a reliable means of transport to bring someone to the “end of the world”. However, there is one destination, in particular, located almost on the edge of the Antarctic Circle, which might just be worth the trip.

On the island of South Georgia (not Georgia, the US state) travelers will find no permanent population or settlement. What they will find, however, is the southernmost museum in the world – one that has recently caught the eye due to its exciting reopening.

So why would anyone want to travel so far to see a museum? Let’s find out.


The South Georgia Whale Museum

To be fair, there aren’t many redeeming qualities of such a place – with freezing temperatures, no way to import fresh food, and a journey that usually takes days just to get in and out of the Isle. That being said, the beauty of South Georgia and the South Georgia Whale Museum, in general, is found in its not-so-subtle remoteness. Initially, the South Georgia Whaling Museum’s goal began as an initiative to clean up abandoned whaling stations that were left behind when the industry died out. This project started in 1989, and Nigel Bonner, the museum’s founder, had this to say about the initiative:


“I think we are serving a useful function: visitors are obviously interested and, above all, impressed. If this leads them to think a little deeper about the whaling industry, natural resource management and I think we’ll have achieved our goal.

Humble beginnings

A construction project in the Arctic might not get as much attention as, say, a construction project in the middle of New York City. The beginnings of the South Georgia Whaling Museum were humble, and the suggestion for a museum came from David Wynn-Williams, who was an Antarctic scientist in 1989. It was then that Nigel Bonner, having extensive experience living in Georgia South at the time, founded it; three years later, the South Georgia Whaling Museum opened. Over time, many museum buildings have been renovated, including the director’s villa, the “little villa” and the church chapel.


Related: Life Below Zero: An Isolated Alaskan Stay at Kavik River Camp

Visit the South Georgia Whale Museum

Those who travel to Grytviken will be impressed with all that this ultra-remote region has to offer. Although it is the most remote museum in the world, it also houses an extensive collection of historical artifacts which obviously cannot be seen anywhere else. The complete history of whaling in South Georgia is detailed through a number of exhibits:

  • Grytviken Church
  • Exhibition News
  • Jarvis Room
  • Princely Room
  • Bonner Room
  • Fullerton Hall
  • Feedback room
  • Allardyce Room
  • Ringdal, or whaler’s superimposed chamber
  • Hall of pits or hall of trades of the whaler
  • The Carr Maritime Gallery


This museum may look small on the outside but offers a wealth of information to its visitors that takes up most of a full day. Upon entering the main building, each room is easily accessible for self-guided tours, with the Carr Maritime Gallery right next door and the church a short walk away.

  • Do: Whaling in the area ceased completely in 1964 when the museum (before being a proper museum) lay dormant for two decades).

As one walks through each room, these carefully curated exhibits include artifacts from the height of the whaling era that are barely seen in the world today. Newspaper clippings and documents of interest also line the walls, further detailing the background of whaling in South Georgia. Some rooms, such as the Fullerton Room, even include full screens such as a surveying setup, complete with tent and surveying equipment.


Visitors can see additional artifacts such as:

  • Whale oil samples
  • Life-size albatross replica
  • Plans of the original whalers
  • The preserved fetus of a humpback whale
  • Ship replicas, such as the James Caird
  • Various tools used for whaling
  • Original expedition outfits and uniforms
  • Other life-size replicas of animals native to South Georgia

In addition to seeing the museum, visitors can walk around the park and also stop at Grytviken Cemetery.

Visit Grytviken, South Georgia

As implied, visiting this island is not an easy task. Those who work at the museum experience a week long trip just to reach the island – with flights from the UK to the Falkland Islands, another flight to Cape Verde and a final journey on a fishing boat which takes up to six days on its own.

Travelers have another option, however, and that is to board a cruise from Argentina. These ships take visitors to South Georgia, with about 100 ships each year, according to BBC. Before the pandemic, it was estimated that there were around 10,000 visitors a year to South Georgia Island.

Next: Remote Pitcairn Island: Home of the furthest Airbnb?

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Hudson River Maritime Museum presents virtual lecture on 19th century civil rights activist – Daily Freeman https://laprairie-shlm.com/hudson-river-maritime-museum-presents-virtual-lecture-on-19th-century-civil-rights-activist-daily-freeman/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 18:15:20 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/hudson-river-maritime-museum-presents-virtual-lecture-on-19th-century-civil-rights-activist-daily-freeman/ KINGSTON, NY – The Hudson River Maritime Museum has announced an upcoming lecture titled “The World of Elizabeth Jennings,” by Jerry Mikorenda, taking place virtually Wednesday, February 23 at 7 p.m. in conjunction with Human History Month. Black. For many, the civil rights movement began with Rosa Parks’ courageous stand against segregation in 1955. However, […]]]>

KINGSTON, NY – The Hudson River Maritime Museum has announced an upcoming lecture titled “The World of Elizabeth Jennings,” by Jerry Mikorenda, taking place virtually Wednesday, February 23 at 7 p.m. in conjunction with Human History Month. Black.

For many, the civil rights movement began with Rosa Parks’ courageous stand against segregation in 1955. However, few realize that the right for African Americans to even ride streetcars was won 100 years ago. previously in a landmark civil rights case in New York. City.

In 1854, traveling was fraught with danger. Omnibus accidents were commonplace. Pedestrians were regularly attacked by Five Points gangs. Rival police forces watched and argued over who should help. None of this was on Elizabeth Jennings’ mind as she climbed onto the platform on the Chatham Street horse-drawn carriage.

But his destination and that of the country took a sudden turn when the driver told him to wait for the next car because there were “his people” in it. When she refused to leave the bus, she was assaulted by the driver, who was assisted by a police officer.

Jennings fought for the right to ride New York horse carts, with future President Chester A. Arthur as her defense attorney.

Mikorenda brings this little-known struggle to life with “The World of Elizabeth Jennings,” based on her book, “America’s First Freedom Rider: Elizabeth Jennings, Chester A. Arthur, and the Early Fight for Civil Rights.”

Using rare vintage photos and lithographs, the author recreates Jennings’ world by exploring the sites and people of old New York as the momentous battle with the Third Avenue Railroad unfolded.

Conference tickets are $7 for the general public and free for Hudson River Maritime Museum members. To register, visit www.hrmm.org/lecture-series.

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Banners of Asian American artists on display at the Noguchi Museum https://laprairie-shlm.com/banners-of-asian-american-artists-on-display-at-the-noguchi-museum/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 17:00:32 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/banners-of-asian-american-artists-on-display-at-the-noguchi-museum/ In response to the rise of anti-Asian hate crimes, the Noguchi museum in Long Island City launched its first open call for artist banners and honored the finalists at an opening reception, where the banner made its debut. The event held in November brought together artists and their guests, museum partner organizations, elected officials and […]]]>

In response to the rise of anti-Asian hate crimes, the Noguchi museum in Long Island City launched its first open call for artist banners and honored the finalists at an opening reception, where the banner made its debut.

The event held in November brought together artists and their guests, museum partner organizations, elected officials and staff, including Museum Director Brett Littman, who opened the reception.

In an effort to raise awareness and amplify local AAPI voices, emerging AAPI artists based in Queens were invited to submit designs for the museum’s outdoor banner space to advocate for the fight against racism, where one artist would earn an honorarium of $ 1,000 and two finalists would each receive $ 500.

The initiative was created to show solidarity with the Japanese heritage of museum founder Isamu Noguchi and to act against the Asian hatred that has circulated information since the start of the pandemic.

“Amid the escalation of violence against the AAPI community and across the United States, staff felt absolutely compelled to prove that we are allies of these marginalized communities,” Littman said in his speech to ‘opening.

According to the media coordinator of the Noguchi museum, Justin Baez, the artist applications were assessed by a jury made up of the museum’s organizing committee, an interdepartmental and intergenerational group of volunteers, including himself, and representatives. two local partner organizations, Queen’s Arts Council and Asian-American Arts Alliance.

After receiving and narrowing down more than 20 entries, the museum selected Chemin Hsiao as the first winner and Woomin Kim and Mo Kong as the finalists.

(From left to right) Mo Kong, Woomin Kim and Chemin Hsiao won the Noguchi Museum’s call for nominations. (Photo credit: Katherine Abbott)
(Left to right) Brett Littman, Mo Kong, Woomin Kim and Chemin Hsiao. (Photo credit: Katherine Abbott)

Featured through six outdoor banners, Hsiao’s work, titled “Dandelions Know” (2021), was chosen for its powerful message of anti-racism, solidarity and hope in response to the growing wave of violence and fear facing Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders across the United States.

“What attracted us to Hsiao’s work is his ability to capture a lot of personal emotions towards the subject, doing it in a way that is aesthetically translatable by the banners,” Baez said. “We also appreciated the way he approached not only anti-racism, but the current political landscape in a narrative way.”

Hsiao, an Elmhurst-based Taiwanese visual artist, was initially reluctant to submit a banner proposal, struggling to figure out how to approach the heavy topic.

What ultimately drove him to participate was how much he admired Noguchi’s experience as Nisei, a second-generation Japanese American, especially during WWII.

In his essay, “I Become a Nisei”, Noguchi wrote that the Nisei are “an intermediate people with no common ground.” This particular quote, Hsiao said, is the essence of the central dandelion.

“Overall, the banner should be about Asian hate crimes and violence, but this specific piece is about Mr. Noguchi himself and how he feels and how I relate to the fact that he’s from Taiwan.” , Hsiao said. “I just took that perspective and thought, as a Taiwanese and a member of the AAPI community living in New York City, how do I feel? “

When you arrive at the entrance to the museum, the banners are presented in sequential order: 1) “Surrounded”, 2) “Fear”, 3) “Cut the loop”, 4) “Dandelions know (as they float too ) ”, 5)“ Heal and forgive (if possible) ”, 6)“ We are only humans. Keep communicating.

“Each of them serves a different purpose, but if I had to choose [my favorite], it’s the happy accident at the center of the series, the dandelion, ”Hsiao said. “When I planned the six drafts, this one was the hardest to come out because it’s not really related to Asian hate crimes, but ultimately it’s the one that people identify with the most. “

“Dandelions Know” banner (Photo credit: Katherine Abbott)

Hsiao’s hope is that the public aspect of the artwork will pique the interest of all passers-by and make them stop, look, and be curious.

Inside the museum, there is a description of the banner, as well as descriptions and visuals of the proposed banners by the two finalists.

Kong, a Chinese multidisciplinary artist and researcher residing in Sunnyside, created his works in the midst of the pandemic, preserving objects, such as food and trinkets from childhood, in the tradition of classical art to the inside their refrigerator.

Whether the pictures act as some sort of puzzle or a familiar ensemble, Kong hopes people can always relate to the pictures.

“What I’m trying to do is use [this project] like a mirror to reflect and verify our personal history, where we came from and why certain things are important to us, ”Kong said. “I also want to show, especially to immigrant children and children, the possibilities of creating works of art. You don’t have to have high access to start making art, but it can be anything around you.

The next finalist, Kim, a South Korean artist based in Ridgewood, wanted to change the inaccurate and xenophobic narrative surrounding shijang, or street markets.

“I just wanted to create the shijang narrative in a way that I know is more accurate to me, which is very colorful and festive and full of energy and vibrancy,” Kim said. “This is an organic conservation of material that might not make sense in Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s.”

The museum was drawn to how Kim’s aesthetic combined with the theme, especially with his use of textiles and materiality. “The way she created the banners kind of speaks to and elevates the day to day nature of Asian American life,” Baez said.

Mo Kong showing their banner design to guests at the reception. (Photo credit: Katherine Abbott)

Through her panels, Kim hopes she can provide visitors from Asian communities with moments of familiarity and recall their own memories in a festive way, as well as being a voice for Asians’ daily experiences for those unfamiliar with them.

“We are really proud of our finalists and the artists who submitted,” Baez said. “We hope that this will serve as a precedent and that we can continue this series in the following years, adopting different tones and requirements, while maintaining this fundamental vision and this desire to amplify the voice of local artists.”

The banners are displayed outside the entrance to the museum.

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5 Fresh Faces Curating the Bay Area Museum + Artistic Stage https://laprairie-shlm.com/5-fresh-faces-curating-the-bay-area-museum-artistic-stage/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 23:19:38 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/5-fresh-faces-curating-the-bay-area-museum-artistic-stage/ Our world is changing, for better or for worse, and museums, out of necessity, are responding. The coronavirus pandemic has resulted in costly and time-consuming shutdowns, but it has given administrators a chance to address some of the lingering social issues facing all of our institutions: the insistent demands for justice and equality from Black […]]]>

Our world is changing, for better or for worse, and museums, out of necessity, are responding. The coronavirus pandemic has resulted in costly and time-consuming shutdowns, but it has given administrators a chance to address some of the lingering social issues facing all of our institutions: the insistent demands for justice and equality from Black Lives communities. Matter (BLM) and LGBTQIA +; and the fairness demands of the Me Too movement and others.

“Curatorial responsibility has never been more urgent,” said Christina Yang, who begins full-time as chief curator at UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA) in January. ” It’s time to change. “


Yang is one of five recently appointed curators we spoke to about this roundup of new faces. Four out of five are women. Only two were born in the United States. One of the five is South African and the other African American. Two are of Chinese origin and one is Italian. They are all passionate about their work.

Natasha Becker, curator of the African Art Gallery of Fine Arts in San Francisco. Right: Becker’s first museum acquisition “Modern Magic (Studies of African Art from Picasso’s Collection) V.” Images courtesy of the San Francisco Art Museums.

Natasha Becker | FAMSF

Becker, born and raised in South Africa, has just made her first acquisition as the inaugural curator of the African Art Gallery at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (FAMSF). This is a work by the famous Anglo-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare which will be presented at a later date. Shonibare does work that examines the legacy of Western colonialism and its lingering traces on the world today, and this work speaks to the history of European modernism and shows how the avant-garde period was inspired by African objects.

The acquisition responds to one of Becker’s first objectives, namely to create a dialogue between works of contemporary African art and the collection of 300 main works of the gallery, mainly sculptures. The gallery will close next year for renovations that will include the construction of a mini space for contemporary pieces. His vision is certainly influenced by the experience of growing up under apartheid in a remote suburb of Cape Town. She described her first visit to a museum as “uncomfortable”. Images of blacks were either non-existent or depicted as natives. European art was in a separate building.

While in college her first love was photography, but her transformative experience came when she met contemporary artists in Cape Town, and saw how they approached history, current issues, and world affairs from ‘a burning desire for liberation.

Becker holds an MA in African History from the University of the Western Cape in South Africa and completed his PhD in Art History at Binghampton University in New York. She has worked regularly since arriving in the United States in 2003, most recently as Curator in Residence at FactionArtProject in Harlem.

Although Becker acknowledges that important changes have been made in great art institutions, with her appointment to FAMSF as an example, she says, “Now is the time to be accountable, to ask real questions and to transform ideas. American museums. “

Elena Gross, Director of Exhibitions and Curatorial Affairs at the African Diaspora Museum.Left: “Bella Sontez, 2019” by Amoako Boafo, from “Soul of Black Folks”, currently playing at MoAD. Images courtesy of MoAD.

Elena Gross | African Diaspora Museum

Elena Gross, who last summer was promoted to director of exhibitions and curatorial affairs at the Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD), wants to spark a “different conversation”. She says that since the uprising following the murder of George Floyd, many cultural conversations have focused on “How do white institutions consider race?” While she doesn’t think this is a bad idea, “As a black woman and commissioner, my interest is in shifting this conversation to darkness in its fullness and complexity.”

Gross holds a BA in Art History from St. Mary’s College in Maryland and an MA in Visual and Critical Studies from California College of the Arts. She was the creator and co-host of the “What are you watching?” Podcast published by Art Practical before joining MoAD and leading its Emerging Artist Program. “The mark I want to leave is that in the work I do here, we work from an artist-centered and artist-prioritized approach. “

She wants to show “the beautiful diversity and the great scope of the work that currently exists”, by referring to the works increasingly appreciated by West African and African-American artists. In the past, sculpture, especially that collected during colonization, was what people thought of when they thought of African art. She said there is some exciting and far-reaching work going on.

Five exhibitions are currently on display, including 20 works by Ghanaian portrait artist Amoako Boafo that question the “dark gaze” as well as the first major exhibition by Johannesburg artist Billie Zangewa and textile works that examine intersectional identity.

Christina Yang, Chief Curator at BAMPFA.Right: “Boundless Compassion, 1993”, from the upcoming “Spiritual Mountains: The Art of Wesley Tongson”. Images courtesy of BAMPFA

Christina Yang | BAMPFA

Becker and Gross’ desire for change is shared by Yang at BAMPFA, an institution with over 28,000 works of art and 18,000 films and videos. She hopes to participate in “the decolonization of the historical collection, confronting social injustice and reimagining what constitutes an inclusive experience.” Museums, she said, “are doing their math.” In addition to dealing with social problems, there are the effects of the pandemic. Museums, she argues, have a civic responsibility as gathering places to demonstrate their concern for human well-being. “Art heals,” she says. “Art saves lives.

UC Berkeley is a perfect fit for Yang who did his undergraduate studies in History and Art History there and did an internship at BAMPFA. She returns after a 30-year career, including 14 years at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York City and most recently served at the Williams College Museum of Art as Deputy Director of Engagement and Curator of Education. .

And the Bay Area is a good fit for Yang given its rich global Pacific culture. Born to parents of Chinese descent who immigrated here in the 1950s, she spent part of her youth in South Bay and part in Europe. She speaks five languages.

Hoi Leung, curator of the Chinese Cultural CenterRight: Sofía Córdova, photo from the upcoming exhibition “dawn_chorusiii: the fruit they don’t have here. Images courtesy of CCC.

Hoi Leung | Chinese cultural center

Born into the working class in Hong Kong, Hoi Leung and her family moved to the United States in 2004 when she was a young girl. After graduating from UCLA with an art degree, Leung began volunteering at the Chinese Cultural Center. He appealed to her because of his more than 50-year-old roots in San Francisco’s Chinatown and his long-standing commitment to social and racial justice.

Leung assumed increasing responsibilities and was appointed curator of the Center in 2019. “I owe my knowledge to the neighborhood. I learned to do the police station from Chinatown. She practices “community building curating”, starting from the bottom up and cultivating long term relationships with artists and local partners, “being at the intersection of art and community”.

Covid, Stop Asian Hate and BLM have only strengthened the Centre’s commitment to its long-standing mission of being a voice uplifting underserved people on issues such as racial justice, urban development, gentrification, l queer aesthetics and diasporic identities.

The opening this month is “dawn_chorusiii: the fruit they don’t have here.” A video work telling the stories of six women from the Bay Area who came to the United States as refugees. The Chinese Cultural Center and artist Sofia Cordóva worked closely on this two-year storytelling project with other community organizations.

Curator Furio Rinaldi pictured at the exhibition “Color Into Line: Pastels from the Renaissance to the Present Image courtesy of San Francisco Art Museums.

Furio Rinaldi | FAMSF

In May 2020, when Rinaldi joined FAMSF as Curator of Drawings and Prints, the museum was closed due to Covid, but this period of less activity had an advantage in that it had more than time to discover the often hidden treasures of the museum’s 90,000. + collection of works of art on paper: drawings, prints and artist’s books. The collection, the largest on the west coast, spans the 15th to the 21st century and is housed within the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts in the museum.

Raised in Italy with a doctorate from the University of Rome, Rinaldi’s area of ​​expertise is Italian drawings of the 15th and 16th centuries, in particular the schools of the “greats” of the Renaissance – Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael and Michel- Angel. He considers drawing as “the father of art”. “After all,” he says, “painting, sculpture and architecture usually begin with drawings.

In less than two years, Rinaldi organized “Color into Line: Pastels from the Renaissance to the Present”. In the process of setting up the exhibition, two important reallocations, based on his scholarship, were made. Two key acquisitions were also made: an 18th century pastel landscape by Elisabeth Louise Vigée-LeBrun and a 21st century pastel depicting a homeless camp by Donna Anderson Kam.

Each gallery contains works by male and female artists, including three female artists, starting with 18th-century Venetian artist Rosalba Carriera, whose pastel portraits have been widely acclaimed. The works of impressionist artists Berthe Morisot, Mary Cassatt and Eva Gonzalès are the highlights of the exhibition.
Going forward, the museum and Rinaldi have bold plans to present the Achenbach collection with an ambitious exhibition program.

This article was written by Dorothy Reed for Monthly SF / Arts. Dorothy is an award-winning journalist, writer and editor. She received her MA in Creative Writing from USF and studied American Literature at Stony Brook University, NY. She was an assistant professor and director of the journalism program at Long Island University.

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Protest is personal in Joshua Rashaad McFadden’s Eastman Museum Art Exhibition | Art https://laprairie-shlm.com/protest-is-personal-in-joshua-rashaad-mcfaddens-eastman-museum-art-exhibition-art/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 16:41:15 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/protest-is-personal-in-joshua-rashaad-mcfaddens-eastman-museum-art-exhibition-art/ As a photographer and curator, it is rare that an art exhibition makes me cry. But that’s exactly what happened with “Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On,” a retrospective photography exhibition at the George Eastman Museum. The dark walls and subdued lights of the gallery space attracted me. At the entrance to the […]]]>

As a photographer and curator, it is rare that an art exhibition makes me cry. But that’s exactly what happened with “Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On,” a retrospective photography exhibition at the George Eastman Museum.

The dark walls and subdued lights of the gallery space attracted me. At the entrance to the exhibition is a mirror with the words “BE REAL BLACK FOR ME”.

This imperative served two purposes: to welcome black spectators to a museum that caters to predominantly white artists for predominantly white audiences, and to challenge white spectators to change their mindset. It was a daring, even radical, statement affirming the right presence of black art in a museum setting.

It’s also rare for an artist as young as Joshua Rashaad McFadden – he’s only 31 – to receive a retrospective so early in his career at a gallery like the George Eastman Museum, which tends to recognize artists with portfolios. more extensive.

Click to enlarge

  • PHOTO BY ERICH CAMPING
  • Joshua Rashaad McFadden mingles with attendees from the George Eastman Museum at the opening reception for the photo retrospective “Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On”.

“Joshua Rashaad McFadden: I Believe I’ll Run On” is a stunning look at one of contemporary photography’s most provocative black artists, who also happens to be a native of Rochester. The exhibit is on view at the Eastman Museum until June 19.

I started following McFadden’s work during the 2020 social uprising in Rochester following the murder of Daniel Prude. I was obsessively refreshing social media pages, watching pictures and videos of friends and family in the Rochester Police Department tear gas and pepperball assault. McFadden was on the front lines, documenting interactions between protesters and police with live video clips and photographs, and capturing both the astonishing violence and the uplifting response from the community.

“I had to go and document this no matter what,” McFadden said. “I had to do it.”

Click to enlarge
"Irony of Black Policeman (Atlanta, Georgia), 2020, from "Troubles in America: Rayshard Brooks." - PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN

  • PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN
  • “Irony of Black Policeman (Atlanta, GA), 2020, from” Unrest in America: Rayshard Brooks “.

McFadden has a lot on his plate, creatively. He had already started teaching at RIT when he began documenting the protests in Rochester. He also covered similar protests in Minneapolis, Atlanta and Washington, DC.

“With this kind of work, no, there is no sleep,” he explained. “The protests took place all day and in the middle of the night until 4 am. So, (I) slept two hours a night all summer, really until this year, because Derek Chauvin’s trial happened this year in April.

“He worked without sleep for a long, long, long time. But the job had to be done.

In the protest photography genre, McFadden’s work often captures the unfiltered emotional responses of protesters.

For McFadden, capturing black grief is only a small part of capturing black life. He considers his projects individually, but admits that because the works sometimes overlap, the images and their stories begin to inform.

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"I relate directly to the plight of black Americans who experience racism in this country," McFadden said. "And so, going out and documenting it was very difficult.  And you will see the intense emotion of the photograph." - PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN

  • PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN
  • “I am directly linked to the plight of black Americans who experience racism in this country,” McFadden said. “And so, going out and documenting that was very difficult. And you will see the intense emotion of the photograph.”

McFadden returned to Rochester in 2018 after several years in Atlanta, where he taught photography at Spelman College, to accept an art residency at the Visual Studies Workshop. He currently teaches at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

From there, he produced “Evidence,” an exhibition that illustrates the breadth of black masculinity and gender through portraits of men alongside those of their fathers or father figures. At the same time, McFadden was motivated by the recent death of his grandfather and produced “Love Without Justice,” an autobiographical photo series that used photos from his family’s archives.

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PHOTO BY ERICH CAMPING

In his portraits of other people, there is a rawness and a desire for deep self-exploration. “I think the job is really me,” he said. “And it’s not really too glamorous or staged. Especially with the archives, it’s very personal. Especially in ‘Love without justice’. I just add to the archive. So I think it’s me, for sure. Completely unfiltered.

McFadden says his personal experience also motivates his photojournalism work.

“Along with other things, like ‘Unrest in America’, and documenting protests across the country, it’s also very personal. I’m directly linked to the plight of black Americans who experience racism in this country,” a- he said. “And so, going out and documenting it was very difficult. And you will see the intense emotion of the photograph. And it is not only because it is a touching moment, but you will see my emotion. in these photographs.

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"I can't breathe: Minneapolis, Minnesota," 2020, from "Troubles in America: George Floyd." - PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN

  • PHOTO BY JOSHUA RASHAAD MCFADDEN
  • “I Can’t Breathe: Minneapolis, Minnesota,” 2020, from “Unrest in America: George Floyd”.

Exploring the self through the chronicle of black life more broadly has been a constant theme of McFadden’s career.

“It always comes down to this constant referencing image map of itself,” said K. Anthony Jones, art critic and McFadden collaborator. “It becomes self-referential throughout this whole loop. “

“He’s exploring what it means not to have a home in this place,” Jones later said.

Eastman Museum executive director Bruce Barnes acknowledged this in his remarks at the opening of “I Believe I’ll Run On,” saying the exhibit “chronicles the intimacy of black life in the United States. And was “a testament to healing and the protective possibilities of turning in on oneself.”

McFadden wanted his work to elicit a visceral response, the kind of real response that, as he put it, was “unfiltered by the institution in which it exists.”

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PHOTO BY JASON MILTON

Museums are spaces for ritual practice, housing objects and artefacts revered by the community that supports them. McFadden’s exhibition plays on this, with lighting and colors that incite an almost holy exaltation of the work. Watching exhibit attendees engage in different ways reminded me of the difference between going to church in New York City with my white mother and going to church in South Carolina with my black father: solemn silence versus jubilant reverence.

It is rare that we are able to gift their flowers to artists while they are still in business and even more exceptional when we are able to do so near the start of what appears to be on the way to a meteoric career.

“This is just the start,” McFadden said. “I have so much more work to do and so much more to say.”

Amanda Chestnut is a freelance writer for CITY. Comments on this article can be directed to dkushner@rochester-citynews.com.

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Currier Museum: An artistic installation reflects the anniversary of September 11 https://laprairie-shlm.com/currier-museum-an-artistic-installation-reflects-the-anniversary-of-september-11/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://laprairie-shlm.com/currier-museum-an-artistic-installation-reflects-the-anniversary-of-september-11/ Photo / James Nachtwey MANCHESTER, NH – In memory of September 11, the Currier Museum of Art has installed a targeted exhibition of images of the day and its consequences. Famous war photographer Jim Nachtwey was at his home near the World Trade Center and took remarkable photographs of the scenes of destruction and struggle. […]]]>
Photo / James Nachtwey

MANCHESTER, NH – In memory of September 11, the Currier Museum of Art has installed a targeted exhibition of images of the day and its consequences. Famous war photographer Jim Nachtwey was at his home near the World Trade Center and took remarkable photographs of the scenes of destruction and struggle. They are accompanied by a painting by Upper Valley artist Reginald Vessey, who photographed with remarkable intensity one of the commemorative fences erected in the region.

Each of us has our own memory and understanding of past events, and we invite visitors to see what these artists have created.

The exhibition will be on display until October 31.

“911 on Vesey Street,” by Upper Valley artist Reginald Vessey.

Dartmouth graduate photographer James Nachtwey. Image / dartmouth.edu

Biography

James Nachtwey (born 1948, Syracuse, NY) graduated from Dartmouth College in 1970 and began his career as a documentary photographer in 1980. He has photographed historical events such as the break-up of the former Yugoslavia, the war in Chechnya, civil unrest in Northern Ireland. , the genocide in Rwanda, the liberation struggle in South Africa, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the earthquake in Nepal. Some of Nachtwey’s most compelling works are images of the 9/11 terrorist attack in New York City, the wars that followed in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the challenges faced by soldiers returning from those wars.


About Currier

The Currier Museum is an internationally renowned art museum located in Manchester, New Hampshire. The museum features paintings, sculptures, decorative arts, and photographs, including works by Monet, Picasso, O’Keeffe, Hopper, Wyeth, and Mitchell. It features exhibitions, tours, art classes and special programs throughout the year. Two houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright are part of its permanent collection.

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